Creative Nonfiction Workshops, Panels and Events

TO REGISTER FOR THE FULL CONFERENCE AND ENROLL IN A THREE-DAY WORKSHOP OR THREE-DAY CRITICAL SEMINAR, CLICK ON THE BUTTON BELOW. ALL KEYNOTE TALKS, PANELS, ONE-DAY WORKSHOPS, READINGS AND SPECIAL EVENTS ARE INCLUDED IN GENERAL REGISTRATION, AS IS ATTENDANCE AT THE POETRY SYMPOSIUM EACH AFTERNOON. ALL THREE-DAY WORKSHOPS AND THREE-DAY CRITICAL SEMINARS REQUIRE AN ADDITIONAL FEE OF $200.

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CREATIVE NONFICTION PANELS

Creative Nonfiction Panel #1: "Why Environmental Journalism Is About More Than You Think." Brian Calvert (Editor of High Country News), Moderator, Paige Blankenbuehler, and others.

Thursday, July 19, 8:30 - 10:00 am, Taylor Hall 226

TO SEE FULL BIOGRAPHIES OF THE PANELISTS, CLICK EACH SPEAKER'S NAME BELOW:​​

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Creative Nonfiction Panel #2: "Investigative Journalism Today: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly." Patrick Pexton, Moderator, with others.

Saturday, July 21, 2:00 - 4:00 pm, Taylor Hall 229

TO SEE FULL BIOGRAPHIES OF THE PANELISTS, CLICK EACH SPEAKER'S NAME BELOW:​​

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CREATIVE NONFICTION ONE-DAY WORKSHOPS

Creative Nonfiction One-Day Workshop #1: "Writing the Modern American West(s)."

Instructor: Brian Calvert.

Thursday, July 19, 2:00 - 4:00, Taylor Hall 204

The American west is a vibrant, complex and dynamic place that is always changing and developing. Join us as we discuss why writing about the region is also changing and how you as a writer can be a part of this movement.

Brian Calvert
Brian Calvert is the Managing Editor of High Country News, the nation's leading source of reporting on the American west. A fourth-generation Wyoming native, he grew up in Pinedale and graduated from the University of Northern Colorado in 1994 with a BA in English liberal arts and minors in writing and media studies. He has worked as a foreign correspondent, writer, audio journalist, and most recently, a Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado. After extensive time in Cambodia, China and Afghanistan, Brian has a new appreciation for the West and is thrilled to be back. When he's not working, you can find him outside, trying to regain his mountain hardiness. He is also earning an MFA in Poetry at Western.

 

 

 

 

 

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Creative Nonfiction One-Day Workshop #2: "The Art of the Op-Ed." Instructor: Patrick Pexton

Sunday, July 22, 2:00 - 4:00, Taylor Hall 200

Rare is the writer who has not wanted to appear on the newspaper page opposite the editorials ("op-ed"), making a complete and compelling argument in a mere 750-words. This workshop will introduce the art and craft of the op-ed, which is a particular form of journalism with its own rules and protocols.

Patrick Pexton

Patrick Pexton is currently defense and foreign policy editor for CQ Roll Call. Before that, he was editor-in-chief of The Frederick News-Post, a seven-day daily newspaper and 24-hour website serving the quarter million people who live in Maryland's largest county by geography. Before that, he was The Washington Post's final ombudsman, managing director of custom content at Connections Media, and deputy editor of National Journal, a nonpartisan magazine and website about politics and policy in the nation's capital.

 

 

 

 

 

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CREATIVE NONFICTION THREE-DAY WORKSHOPS AND CRITICAL SEMINARS

All Three-Day Workshops and Critical Seminars meet Thursday, 7/19, Saturday, 7/21, and Sunday, 7/22, from 10:15 - 12:15. Cost: $200 in addition to registration. 

Creative Nonfiction Three-Day Workshop #1: “Going Short.” Instructor: Kase Johnstun.

Location: Taylor Hall 201

From glossies to e-zines, from travel pieces to newspaper features, and from print literary journals to online journals, editors of creative nonfiction and memoir are looking short. "Modern Love," the New York Times memoir column about love, asks for no more than 1,500 words. Salon wants 1,000 word pieces for their “LIFE" section, and Southwest asks for 1,500 exactly. These publications pay more than a dollar a word, so it’s best to adhere to their submission guidelines.  But how do we write a whole memoir/essay in less than 1,500 words? We practice. These publications, and the hundreds around the country that mimic them, expect essays to have a full narrative arc within that word count, and they expect that none of the literary craft techniques are trimmed. They expect the following: an inciting incident, tension, character, background, flashbacks, narrative description, a climax, and a resolution. They do not publish slice-of-life pieces that hunker down in one moment and don’t move forward — those have become less and less attractive to editors over the last decade. given the reality of this market, this workshop will analyze pieces form the New York Times, Salon, Real Simple, Brevity, Creative Nonfiction, Southwest, and Travel and Leisure and examine how the authors pulled off the highest quality essays (memoir and narrative travel) in so few words. 

 

Kase Johnstun
Kase Johnstun lives and writes in Ogden, Utah. He is the author of recently released Beyond the Grip Craniosynostosis (McFarland & Co), which has been featured in Pennsylvania Parenting MagazinePortland Family MagazineThe Ogden Standard Examiner, and many other places, as well as having mentions in the Chicago Tribune and the Seattle Times. It was recently awarded the Gold Quill (First Place) in Creative Nonfiction by the League of Utah Writers for 2015. His work has been published widely by literary journals and trade magazines, including, but not limited to, Yahoo ParentingCreative Nonfiction Magazine, and The Chronicle Review. He is the co-editor/author of Utah Reflections: Stories from the Wasatch Front (The History Press), which was name the Salt Lake Tribune’s book of the month for August 2014 and the League of Utah Writers Recommended Read in Nonfiction 2015 (Third Place). His essay collection Tortillas for Honkies was named a finalist for the 2013 Autumn House press Nonfiction Awards (most of the essays in the collection have found homes in places like The Watershed ReviewLabel Me Latino/aPrime Number Literary Magazine, and Animal Literary Magazine). Most recently, he was the writer-in-residence at JIWAR international artist residency in Barcelona, Spain where he finished one novel and wrote most of another.

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Creative Nonfiction Three-Day Workshop #2: "Building Story in Nature Writing.” Instructor: Karen Hausdoerrfer.

Location: Taylor Hall 112D

Story provides the muscle that moves creative nonfiction, and this is as true in nature writing as in any other subgenre of CNF. Narrative compels readers to engage with the reflection and exposition that add depth to an essay. As readers, we want to know what will happen next, and we want to unravel the mysteries of what came before. We care most about these questions when we engage with the characters who inhabit the stories. To captivate readers, how do nonfiction writers adapt the techniques of fiction?  How do the best nature writers tell compelling human stories in relationship to the natural world? This workshop and practicum combines writing exercises, feedback groups, discussion of short essays, and even theatre games. Each component will help participants build narrative tension, develop gripping scenes, and paint vivid characters.

Karen Hausdoerrfer
Karen Hausdoerffer teaches environmental writing at Western Colorado University.  She earned her MFA at the University of Idaho, and she has published work in Indiana Review, Shenandoah, Crab Creek Review, Backcountry Magazine, Flyway and other journals.  She has won an Associated Writing Programs Intro Journals award. Her Middle Grade novel, “City of a Thousand Paths,” has received representation from Folio Literary Management.

 

 

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