Latin American Studies

Careers

Career preparation starts your first year at Western. Visit Career Services in Library 120 and online at western.edu/career to discover your interests, define your goals and land your dream job.

The data below is automatically collected by Burning Glass Technologies, a firm that sources job market data and provides analytics. The statistics illustrate general trends in U.S. careers, but do not precisely represent every job and salary.

Courses

For required courses and degree plans, visit the official University Catalog. Below is a general overview of courses at Western Colorado University related to this area of study.

 ART 421 - Art of Mesoamerica and the Andean Region of South America (3 cred.)

A survey of the arts of the Pre-contact civilizations in Middle America and the Andes. The art and architecture of these ancestral peoples are examined within their cultural contexts. Prerequisite: junior standing or instructor permission.

 ECON 303 - International Economics and Globalization (3 cred.)

An exploration of economic, political, and social effects of globalization. This is examined from the perspectives of trade, development, finance, and the environment. The first half of the course focuses on the impacts of international trade. This includes preferential trading relations, protectionism, global trade agreements, competitiveness, and possible conflicts between trade and social objectives. The second half of the course focuses on international monetary relations and regimes. This includes understanding the balance of payments, exchange rate determination, currency crises, and international debt. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151with a minimum grade of ÒC-Ó; ECON 201; ECON 202 recommended.

 GEOG 351 - Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean (3 cred.)

A thematic study of the physiographic and cultural regions of Latin America and the major historical and contemporary geographic processes that characterize the region. Major topics of discussion include climate and physiography, environmental concerns and human rights, the nature of Latin American cities, pre-Hispanic and modern agriculture, and the nature of contemporary economic processes in the region. Prerequisite: GEOG 120 or sophomore standing.

 HIST 260 - History of Latin America (3 cred.)

A survey of the major events and themes of Latin American History from pre-Columbian times through the modern era with special emphasis on the interaction of New and Old World cultures and the impact of colonization and the construction of national identity after independence into the modern era. GT-HI1

 HIST 360 - Mexico (3 cred.)

A broad survey of Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present, withparticular emphasis on social, cultural, political and economic issues. This course also examines Mexico's relations with Europe during the colonial and early national periods and with the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisites: minimum sophomore standing or instructor permission. HIST 200 recommended.

 HIST 367 - Latin American History: Topics (3 cred.)

This course examines a particular topic, theme or region in Latin American History thus course content will vary. Topics may rotate between women and gender, film and history, travel accounts, environmental history or a country or regional study. Students may take this course twice for credit. Prerequisites: minimum sophomore status or instructor permission. HIST 200 recommended.

 POLS 255 - Introduction Comparative Politics (3 cred.)

An introduction to the challenges and problems encountered in the study of comparative politics. Students examine various issues of local and national governance through a comparative lens. By looking at similar political phenomena in several contexts, students explore the question of why some countries have successfully developed their political, economic and social systems while others are lagging behind. Some of the issues examined in the class deal with women's rights, poverty, underdevelopment, the environment, and democracy. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a grade of C- or above.

 SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I (3 cred.)

An introduction to essentials of the Spanish language: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Reserved for students with less than two years of high school Spanish.

 SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II (3 cred.)

A continuation of SPAN 101. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or equivalent.

 SPAN 341 - Latin American Civilization and Culture (3 cred.)

An introduction to the general trends of Latin American civilization, culture and the national character, as expressed in everyday life in the various countries of Latin America. Includes pre-Columbian history to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 255 or equivalent.

Faculty & Staff

Faculty

Brian Bernhardt, Ph.D. headshot
Associate Professor of Politics & Government
Phone: 970.943.3025
Office Location: Kelley Hall 205
Philip L. Crossley, Ph.D. headshot
Professor of Geography
Phone: 970.943.2804
Office Location: Kelley Hall 217
Heather Thiessen-Reily, Ph.D. headshot
Professor of History
Phone: 970.943.7128
Office Location: Kelley Hall 225

Scholarships

Institutional Scholarships

Common Scholarships

Western offers approximately 70 common scholarships for which a wide variety of students are eligible (e.g., locals, veterans, transfers). Apply for any number of these common scholarships using Western’s Common Scholarship Application, which is due April 1. For more information, visit our scholarships page.

Mountaineer Alumni Recommendation Scholarship

Western Colorado University alumni can nominate prospective students for a $500 scholarship ($250 per semester) for first year only. Application deadline is typically June 1. For more information, visit western.edu/mars.

Neighboring States Program

Students with a permanent address from one of the seven contiguous neighboring states to Colorado who have demonstrated financial need are automatically considered for a special $1,000 per year grant, totaling $4,000 over four years.

The Western Neighboring States program can be added to WUE, CP or merit scholarships. So, if you are a permanent resident of one of those seven states—and show financial need—you are eligible.

For more information about the Neighboring States program, visit Western’s Tuition Discount Programs Page.

Presidential Promise

The Presidential Promise is guaranteed to students who have received a scholarship through the Denver Scholarship Foundation (DSF) and/or GearUp—and are eligible for a Pell Grant.

For students who meet these criteria, Western will cover the cost of tuition and fees through the combination of federal, state and institutional aid. For more information on the Presidential Promise, visit our scholarships page.

Tuition Discount Programs

Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) or Central Plains (CP) tuition represents a substantial savings relative to normal, out-of-state tuition. Students eligible for the WUE or CP program will be charged 150% of Western’s total in-state tuition. For 2018-19, total in-state tuition was $8,934. WUE/CP tuition was $13,401. The WUE/CP discount is valued at $4,695.

For more information about the WUE and CP geography-based programs, visit Western’s Tuition Discount Programs Page.

Western Merit Scholarship

Immediately upon acceptance at Western, every student is considered for a merit scholarship worth between $2,500-$4,500 per year for in-state students and $8,000-$10,000 for out-of-state students. The amount is based on the student's GPA and ACT/SAT scores. Visit our Net Price Calculator at western.edu/cost to determine whether you qualify for a merit scholarship. 

For more information about merit scholarships at Western, visit our scholarships page.

Get Involved

A college education is more than just taking courses. Meet new people, apply your skills and stretch beyond your comfort zone. Make your education an experience.

Opportunities in Complementary Programs

Anthropology

  • Backyard Laboratory: Tenderfoot (aka “W”) Mountain, just one mile away from campus, is home to structures dating to the Paleo Indian period—more than 10,000 years ago. Western has conducted field schools on the site since 2001.
     
  • Research: Anthropology students have many opportunities to research in the field and have access to state-of-the-art technology and sites. All students are encouraged to develop and present their own creative and relevant research projects at conferences. 
     
  • Study Abroad: Travel to India, Ecuador, Prague, London, Italy or Belize through Extended Studies.

Art

  • Gallery Exhibits: Students have opportunities to display their work in numerous shows, exhibits, convocations and galas—on campus and in the community.
     
  • Pathfinder Magazine: An annual publication for student creative work.
     
  • Student Art League: A branch of the Council for Creative expression, the Student Art League is dedicated to providing visual arts, experiences, professional development, educational opportunities and outreach for Art students.

Economics

  • Capstone Experience: Senior economics majors incorporate the tools learned throughout the program to engage in an in-depth analysis of increasing economic inequality.
     
  • Internships: Recent students have interned with local government agencies and businesses to analyze current economic data.
     
  • Model United Nations: Compete in the National Model United Nations event in New York City.
     
  • Study Abroad: Experience Harlaxton College in the English Midlands.

History

  • Field Experience: Seniors travel to historical locations, such as the Sand Creek Massacre and Bent’s Old Fort national historical sites to study the role of commemoration and memory.
     
  • History Honor Society: Join Iota Nu Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, one of Western’s oldest academic honor societies.
     
  • History League: Sponsors activities including a book club and catapult construction.
     
  • Internships: Land an internship with the Crested Butte Heritage Museum.
     
  • Study Abroad: Travel to India, Ecuador, Prague, London, Italy or Belize through Extended Studies.

Politics & Government

  • Events: Global Justice Film Series, visiting speakers, political debates and voter registration.
     
  • Internships: Students intern with political candidates, elected officials, nonprofit organizations and legal professionals.
     
  • Mock Trial: Introduces students to real criminal or civil cases to prepare for trial after graduation.
     
  • Model United Nations: Competes in the National Model United Nations event in New York City.
     
  • Politics Clubs: A student-led club that tackles political topics, provides professional development opportunities and works to bring dynamic debate to campus.

Spanish

  • Multicultural Center: Immerse with students from many cultures on campus and participate in community service and organizing cultural events.
     
  • Volunteering: Students serve at Gunnison County’s Multicultural Resources and Project Hope to provide support for local Spanish-speaking individuals searching for additional resources to succeed in life.