Anthropology

  • Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology
    • Major
    • Minor

    Get Involved

    A college education is more than just taking courses. Meet new people, apply your skills and stretch beyond your comfort zone. Make your education an experience.

    • Backyard Laboratory: Tenderfoot (aka “W”) Mountain, just one mile away from campus, is home to structures dating to the Paleo Indian period—more than 10,000 years ago. Western has conducted field schools on the site since 2001.
       
    • Research: Anthropology students have many opportunities to research in the field and have access to state-of-the-art technology and sites. All students are encouraged to develop and present their own creative and relevant research projects at conferences.
       
    • Study Abroad: Travel to India, Ecuador, Prague, London, Italy or Belize through Extended Studies.

    Scholarships

    Institutional Scholarships

    Common Scholarships

    Western offers approximately 70 common scholarships for which a wide variety of students are eligible (e.g., locals, veterans, transfers). Apply for any number of these common scholarships using Western’s Common Scholarship Application, which is due April 1. For more information, visit western.edu/scholarships.

    Early Action Credit

    If a student is accepted to Western by Nov. 1 and qualifies for a merit scholarship, the student will receive an additional $500 for the first year. Use our Net Price Calculator to determine whether you qualify for a merit scholarship.

    Mountaineer Alumni Recommendation Scholarship

    Western Colorado University alumni can nominate prospective students for a $500 scholarship ($250 per semester) for first year only. Application deadline is typically June 1. For more information, visit western.edu/mars.

    Neighboring States Program

    Students with a permanent address from one of the seven contiguous neighboring states to Colorado who have demonstrated financial need are automatically considered for a special $1,000 per year grant, totaling $4,000 over four years.

    The Western Neighboring States program can be added to WUE, CP or merit scholarships. So, if you are a permanent resident of one of those seven states—and show financial need—you are eligible.

    For more information about the Neighboring States program, visit Western’s Tuition Discount Programs Page.

    Presidential Promise

    The Presidential Promise is guaranteed to students who have received a scholarship through the Denver Scholarship Foundation (DSF) and/or GearUp—and are eligible for a Pell Grant.

    For students who meet these criteria, Western will cover the cost of tuition and fees through the combination of federal, state and institutional aid. For more information on the Presidential promise, visit western.edu/scholarships.

    Tuition Discount Programs

    Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) or Central Plains (CP) tuition represents a substantial savings relative to normal, out-of-state tuition. Students eligible for the WUE or CP program will be charged 150% of Western’s total in-state tuition. For 2018-19, total in-state tuition was $8,934. WUE/CP tuition was $13,401. The WUE/CP discount is valued at $4,695.

    For more information about the WUE and CP geography-based programs, visit Western’s Tuition Discount Programs Page.

    Western Merit Scholarship

    Immediately upon acceptance at Western, every student is considered for a merit scholarship worth between $2,500-$4,500 per year for in-state students and $8,000-$10,000 for out-of-state students. The amount is based on the student's GPA and ACT/SAT scores. Visit our Net Price Calculator at western.edu/cost to determine whether you qualify for a merit scholarship. 

    For more information about merit scholarships at Western, visit western.edu/scholarships.

    Faculty & Staff

    Faculty

    David M. Hyde, Ph.D. headshot
    Lecturer in Anthropology, MGES Instructor
    Phone: 970.943.2222
    Office Location: Hurst Hall 031A
    Lynn Sikkink, Ph.D. headshot
    Professor of Anthropology
    Phone: 970.943.2062
    Office Location: Hurst Hall 31C
    Mark Stiger, Ph.D. headshot
    Professor of Anthropology
    Phone: 970.943.2073
    Office Location: Hurst Hall 25B

    Courses

    FOR REQUIRED COURSES AND DEGREE PLANS, VISIT THE OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY CATALOG. This is a sample of courses offered by Western Colorado University. To ensure the courses you need are offered during the current semester, please visit the university course search.

     ANTH 107 - Introduction to General Anthropology (3 credits)

    A general introduction to anthropology. All three sub-fields of modern anthropology:cultural anthropology (archaeology and ethnography), physical anthropology, and linguistics are covered.

     ANTH 218 - Physical Anthropology (with laboratory) (4 credits)

    An examination of biological variation in modern human populations and biological evolution of humans as shown by the fossil record. Additional course fee applies. Prerequisite: ANTH 107.

     ANTH 219 - Archaeology (with laboratory) (4 credits)

    A study of the methods and theory of modern archaeology. The emphasis is on how archaeologists understand the past. A general chronology of world prehistory is presented. Additional course fee applies. Prerequisite: ANTH 107.

     ANTH 230 - Cultural Anthropology (4 credits)

    An exploration of ethnographic theory and methods, and a cross-cultural and comparative examination of societies studied by ethnographers. Additional course fee applies. Prerequisite: ANTH 107.

     ANTH 465 - Research Seminar in Anthropology (3 credits)

    A study of the history and intellectual growth of anthropology is paired with individual work on student projects, which employ theory and methods discussed in class. Students present their work to the university community. Prerequisite: Senior standing; or instructor permission.

     ANTH 467 - Ethnography Field School (4 credits)

    A field experience in cultural anthropology in which students are immersed in the culture, traditions, and lifeways of a group of people, learning methods of inquiry and anthropological perspectives through hands-on experiences. This course may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or instructor permission.

     ANTH 469 - Archaeology Field School (4 credits)

    A field-experience course in which students learn and perform proper field techniques. Some laboratory work may be involved. This course is offered during the summer session and may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Additional course fee applies. Prerequisites: ANTH 219 or instructor permission.

     ANTH 469 - ST: ADVANCED ARCH FIELD SCHL (4 credits)

    A field-experience course in which students learn and perform proper field techniques. Some laboratory work may be involved. This course is offered during the summer session and may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: ANTH 219 or instructor permission.

     ANTH 469 - ST: ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL (4 credits)

    A field-experience course in which students learn and perform proper fieldtechniques. Some laboratory work may be involved. This course is offered during the summer session and may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: ANTH 219 or instructor permission.

     ANTH 469 - ST: TA MAYA ARCH FIELD SCHOOL (4 credits)

    A field-experience course in which students learn and perform proper field techniques. Some laboratory work may be involved. This course is offered during the summer session and may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: ANTH 219 or instructor permission.

     ANTH 469 - ST: ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL II (4 credits)

    A field-experience course in which students learn and perform proper fieldtechniques. Some laboratory work may be involved. This course is offered during the summer session and may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: ANTH 219 or instructor permission.

     MATH 113 - Statistical Thinking (3 credits)

    A course introducing the ideas of statistical analysis. Topics include data visualization and summarization, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. This course emphasizes practical aspects of data analysis and makes extensive use of spreadsheets and real data. Prerequisite: ACT math score of 21 or above; SAT math score of 540 or above; MATH 099; or Accuplacer Elementary Algebra test score of 106 or above; or co-requisite MATH 103 (SAI). GT-MA1

  • Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology
    • Major
    • Minor

    Overview

    Anthropology students build a broad geographical and temporal perspective of human biological and cultural adaptations. This includes an understanding of cultural diversity in our own society, in our world at large and in the past.

    The Program

    The Anthropology program provides students with training in archaeology, physical anthropology and cultural anthropology through work in the laboratory, field and classroom. Students apply information from the classroom as they participate in field studies. Majors are required to take a field school, which may include a stint in Belize, on Tenderfoot Mountain or the San Luis Valley. The field school gives students hands-on field experience in anthropology. Laboratory skills are an important feature of the Anthropology curriculum and students have the opportunity to participate in research with faculty. Anthropology is a standard major, meaning students take it along with another major or minor.

    Students also take to the field every semester on trips that provide an opportunity to visit and explore famous sites and cultural areas discussed in class. These sites include:

    • Hopi Mesas

    • Great Sand Dunes

    • Canyon de Chelly

    • Arches National Park

    Careers & Opportunities

    An Anthropology degree prepares students for graduate school as well as careers in industry, government, education and health. Many students go into cultural resource management, surveying and identifying potentially valuable sites ahead of construction, road building and oil drilling projects. The work can include excavating prehistoric or historical sites when damage cannot be avoided. It requires laboratory analysis and writing reports after fieldwork—skills we stress at Western.

    Learn More

    Reach out to Lynn Sikkink, Ph.D. for more information.