Teacher Institute

Join us for Western's 16th Teacher Institute. June 08-20, 2020

The Teacher Institute provides opportunities for educators to enhance content knowledge, share pedagogy and network with educators from throughout Colorado and beyond.

The Teacher Institute offers a variety of content courses designed specifically for K-12 educators who want to enrich their existing curricula. Intensive seminars with qualified instructors will immerse participants in their subjects. Opportunities include hands-on, individualized activities, instructional enhancements and outdoor classrooms.

The Teacher Institute is made possible through funds provided by the Ann Zugelder Endowment. This allows us to offer a discount of 20% for districts with 2 teachers, and a discount of 50% for districts of 3 or more. New this year: Any past participant of the Teacher Institute can be an Ambassador for TI to earn free credits.  If you refer 5 teachers to register for a class you get one free class.  If you refer 10 teachers to register for a class you get two free classes.  You simply will need to tell friends/teachers to refer you when they complete their registrations. 

We are happy again to announce that this year we will be offering courses that meet CDE’s English Language Learner PD Requirements in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Education training.  These requirements are 3 credits in CLD education for K-12 educators in elementary, math, science, social studies and English language arts.  Look for courses marked with a ★, these courses will provide you with the ELL matrix CDE requires and will serve as supporting documents for fulfilling the 3-credit requirement.  If you have further questions about courses or the requirement, please contact Jenny Whitacre (TI Director).

New this year! Early Childhood Education courses that meet Colorado’s state requirements for licensure and professional development will be offered both weeks of the Teacher Institute.

Please also join us for the inaugural DisAbility Film Festival (June 13 & 14). The DisAbility Film Festival will be a two-day event; Saturday evening will include a screening and keynote of a feature film along with a reception. Following Saturday's reception, we will have one two-hour block of screenings of winning films. On Sunday, we will have three two-hour blocks of screenings throughout the day. Participants can attend the festival and earn graduate credit. Please see course description below for details.

Registration now open!

Register Here

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WEEK 1: June 8th–13th  

Biology

Forest Ecology of the Rocky Mountains

Instructor: Amy Honan

  • Credit: BIOL 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15873
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K - 12

What is a forest? How do forests develop? Will forests change in response to current and future environmental factors or disturbances? Students will investigate these forest ecology questions using the Gunnison Valley as a classroom. This course will provide educators with approaches to getting students outside and engaged in methodologies used by scientists who study forest ecology and land managers tasked with conserving forests. Field trips will provide hands-on experience, practical skills and will deliver a broad overview of forest patterns and processes.

Communication Arts

Western's DisAbility Film Festival

Instructors: Professor Jack Lucido and Dr. Tara Mason

  • Credit: COM 510, 1 credit, $170, CRN 15883
  • Classes: Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. with Keynote 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., and Sunday 1:45 - 4:00 p.m. or 5:45 - 8:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Students enrolled in this course will work inside our DisAbility Film Festival Canvas course to review and reflect on a series of inclusivity-focused readings and films and complete reflections and discussion board collaborations prior to the Western DisAbility Film Festival. During the weekend of June 13 & 14, students will watch and reflect on a series of short and feature length films. Through the lens of Universal Design for Learning and Social Justice, students will rate the inclusive practices observed in each film. The culminating project for the film festival students will be to create a multimodal presentation of their own, potentially film or presentation, to inform or develop an audience in their schools.

Education

★American Sign Language: A Special Tool for Special Classroom Needs (Level I)

Instructors: Karen Immerso and Beth Goldstone

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15884
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

American Sign Language (ASL), is considered a foreign language, a community language or a language of instruction. It is being offered for teachers who have both a personal and professional interest in pursuing new communication skills. This American Sign Language class will take you well beyond general body language awareness in order to become a more widely versed communicator. Lessons and practice sessions during this three-day class will cover the basics of ASL. We will learn basic signs, sentence structure and fingerspelling. You will begin to build your receptive skills. We will explore some cultural aspects of working with a Deaf and Hard of Hearing population. We will also consider the adaptations for ASL with special needs students. Participants may come to a new level of expression and have fun within this truly “hands-on” learning experience.

Connecting ELA Curriculum Units to NGSS

Instructor: Katie Poulsen

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15882
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Elementary

In this course, students will learn how to align their current English Language Arts Curriculum to the Next Generation Science Standards with a focus on incorporating the science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas and cross-cutting concepts in their literacy instruction.  They will become more familiar with the 5E instructional model to design student-centered, inquiry-based science learning engagements.  Students will develop an ELA and Science focused unit connected to their current language arts curriculum to be taught during the upcoming school year.

Create an Earth Biome Using Project WILD and Aquatic Wild

Instructors: Dr. Carol Fortino and Vivian Masters

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 1 Credits, $170, CRN 15877
  • Classes: Monday - Thursday, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Upper Elementary and Middle School

Review your knowledge for teaching upper elementary and middle school (grades 5-8) science.  Create an Earth biome that includes rocks, soil, water, micro-organisms, plants and the atmosphere.  These hands-on experiences designed for both outdoor and indoor classrooms are coordinated with selected activities from the latest Bottle Biology and new Project WILD K-12 and Aquatic Wild.  All activities relate to the Excellence in Environmental Education Guidelines K-12.  In addition, Next Generation Science Standards that include STREAM (Science, Technology, Reading, Engineering, Art and Math) will be emphasized. The completed closed bottle biome can be kept in your classroom for many years for student observation, inquiry questioning and ideas for further study.

★Culture, Creativity, and Collaboration!

Instructor: Rain Bodine

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15893
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Culture, Creativity and Collaboration in the Classroom! This course will utilize hands on creative projects that explore our students’ cultural identities and voice through a variety of lenses. We will collaborate as a class and delve into ways to enhance and engage our own classroom communities.  Expect to create a minimum of four meaningful projects that will accompany lesson plans relevant to your individual subject area and teaching level. This course will also address the standards for English Learner Educator Professional Development. Through the Quality Standards 5.12-5.15, participants will research teaching strategies for CLD populations, including first and second language acquisition, literacy development and methods, materials, and assessment.

PBL Level I: Dive into Project Based Learning

Instructor: Beth Tagliareni

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15886
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Whether you are new to Project-Based Learning (PBL) or a PBL veteran in need of a fresh outlook, this course will be sure to guide you through understanding the importance of PBL in today’s classroom.  Learn how to gradually hand over the learning process to students, a system for planning projects and view countless authentic examples from those doing the work right now.  You will leave this course with your very own new or revised PBL Unit. This course is level I and is meant for participants with little to no PBL experience.

PBL Level II: Empower Your Students with Project Based Learning

Instructor: Keely Moran

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15876
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

The perfect class for those who want to take their students to the next level using Project Based Learning!  Participants should have some experience with Project Based Learning for this level II course. This class is designed to be interactive, reflective, creative and productive for teachers of all subject areas in grades K-12.  We will look at gold standard PBL units in depth using the essential project design elements as well as the 7 project-based teaching practices.  Students will evaluate and revise a PBL unit they have previously planned or taught, as well as design a new PBL unit through a greater understanding of what makes a gold standard unit. Students will walk out of class with a much deeper knowledge of PBL practices, a revised PBL unit and a new PBL unit ready for the upcoming school year, resources, connections and more.  This course is level II, and is meant for participants who have already tried PBL in their classrooms.

★Everything Google: G Suite for Beginner and Intermediate Users

Instructors: Cindy McKee and Kathie Powell

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15885
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

This workshop course will support teachers as they learn the G-Suite tools and the many powerful ways to integrate Google (G-Suite) into the classroom. The course will cover Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, Sites and Classroom. Teachers will leave with the confidence to use the G-Suite tools daily and teach them to their students. This course is a great introduction to Google in the classroom. Participants will be prepared to take the Google Certified Educator Level 1 exam (optional). This course meets the requirements for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education for licensure hours by providing strategies to engage all learners, technology to aid in English language and content learning, G-Suite tools to effectively monitor students’ progress and develop formative and summative assessments, and other teaching strategies and materials for CLD students.

★Teaching with Technology and Universal Design for Learning

Instructors: Kathie Powell and Cindy McKee

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15891
  • Classes: Thursday – Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a set of principles for developing lessons and curriculum that give every student an equal opportunity to learn. Technology integration is a key aspect to UDL and in this class you’ll use UDL to design lessons and units that work for every student in your class. Teachers will explore a variety of the latest technology tools including recording apps (for podcasting and screencasting), FlipGrid (for discussions and collaboration), InsertLearning, Book Creator, Sway (for presentations), and many more! The key to Universal Design for Learning is to allow students to meet the learning objectives with the tool that best suits the child.   This course meets the requirements for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education for licensure hours by providing strategies to engage all learners, technology to aid in English language and content learning, G-Suite tools to effectively monitor students’ progress and develop formative and summative assessments, and other teaching strategies and materials for CLD students.

Trauma-Sensitive Teaching for Special and General Education Teachers

Instructor: Dr. Tara Mason

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340 CRN + $5 course fee, CRN 15880
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Research suggests that more than 68% of all school aged children have experienced some form of trauma (Pappano, 2014). As educators, it can be challenging to support students who may have experienced trauma and poverty. It can also feel overwhelming to consider how we can meet the needs of our students who may have negative experiences in our classrooms due to past traumas being triggered by new events. Through the lens of teaching in differentiated classrooms, this course focuses on trauma-sensitive classrooms and providing practical tips and guidance from that perspective (not as a mental health professional). The purpose of this course is to (1) present an overview of childhood trauma types, effects and research related to trauma-sensitive instruction, (2) suggest strategies for supporting students who are experiencing the effects of trauma, and (3) devise supports for a trauma-sensitive classroom culture, individualized menu of trauma-supports, and resources for special populations. This course is appropriate for K-12 general and special education teachers who would like to work collaboratively to develop resources and differentiated resources from proactive social/emotional supports through intensive supports to use inside classrooms. Finally, trauma-informed teaching provides guidance and resources in the hopes of interrupting the cycle of adversity for our students by empowering and supporting them.

Early Childhood Education

Positive Guidance and Social Emotional Supports for Early Childhood

Instructor: Carie Mitchell

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 3 Credits, $510, CRN 15881
  • Classes: Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Audience: Pre-K-Grade 2

This course explores guidance theories, applications, goals, techniques and factors that influence expectations, classroom management issues and prosocial skills. This course will provide an introduction to the social-emotional development of young children with and without disabilities and practices to support the development of social-emotional skills. We will review the Pyramid Model and learn about the specific approaches at each level of this tiered prevention model. Focuses on children from birth through age eight. This course is equivalent to ECE 103 and will meet state requirements for ECE Childcare Licensing.

Environmental Science

Public Lands for Secondary Educators

Instructor: Sarah Johnson

  • Credit: ENVS 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $15 course fee, CRN 15887
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Secondary

Expand your knowledge of public lands in America. Through interactive, discussion-based learning, you’ll gain a stronger understanding of federal land designations, history of these lands and the context in which these places were protected. Educators will get free access to a brand-new public land high school curriculum. The course aims to build connections between people and America’s public lands as well as awareness that the lands and waters we love today were once, and still are, Indigenous lands. Each day, field trips to local BLM, US Forest Service, National Park and Colorado state lands will expose participants to various agencies and the professionals who manage them. We will explore the many uses and benefits of public lands, as well as the threats they face locally and nationally. Students will also collect citizen science land cover and tree data for NASA’s Globe Observer. Activities from other nationally proven curricula will also be interwoven throughout the course.

History

History of the American West

Instructor: Dr. Duane Vandenbusche

  • Credit: HIST 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15888
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

A history of the colorful American West with emphasis on Mesa Verde, Mountain Men and Fur Trade, Mining Camps, Railroads, Cattle Frontier, Water and the American West of the 21st Century. Field Trips and slide shows are included in the course.

Politics and Government

“Charles Darwin and Edward Abbey Walk Into a Bar…”

Instructor: Dr. Maria Struble

  • Credit: POLS 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15889
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

This course engages all levels of teachers, K-12, into a fun and stimulating discussion about what the relationship between science (a.k.a. Charles Darwin) and environmentalism (a.k.a. Edward Abbey) is.  The course is intended to offer teachers the opportunity to think about the nature of truth, scientific reasoning and environmentalism all in the context of how these issues and questions relate to power (who has it, who does not, who wants it, how do people/organizations get it, etc.).  This is not intended to be a critique of science, nor will the course make teachers question their own personal commitments with regard to the environment, dubbed by my 7-year old with the universal “the Polar ice caps.” My hope is that by engaging some of Abbey and Darwin’s writings, and showing teachers discourses on the development of dams, world hunger, conservationism and agricultural practices, to name a few, we can come to terms with ways of teaching our students (both K-12 and above) how to be more informed, critical, astute and demanding stewards of our world.  The course will combine in-class and out-of-class activities, mostly around campus and Gunnison.

Teaching Empathy Via Current Social/Political Issues

Instructor: Dr. Maria Struble

  • Credit: POLS 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15890
  • Classes: Thursday – Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

The goal for this course is to promote pedagogy-focused on empowering ourselves and others to treat each other and our world with greater collective responsibility, empathy and care. We will look at the struggles of refugees, women, environmental activists, Native activists and others through the medium of poetry, drama, film and short stories.  The course is mostly focused on the US, but will engage with issues in world politics, as international success stories have been and can still be deeply influential when it comes to inspiring and encouraging social justice and change in the United States. The course is very hands on and in addition to doing some basic readings, it is primarily focused on how to help teachers develop practical lesson plans they can take back to their classroom.  Talking about minority issues, social justice and equality are hard things to do, so my hope is that we can come up with ways of engaging our students in conversations that are inspiring, challenging and promote positive action.  

Outdoor Recreation

Call of the Wild: Understanding the Motivational & Inspiring Effects of the Outdoors for Classroom Teaching

Instructor: Dr. James Whitacre

  • Credit: ROE 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15892
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

This course will give teachers foundational knowledge and theory in addition to skills to empower students through the use of the natural, outdoor environment into the traditional classroom setting.  As each generation of our society moves more towards urban environments, it is imperative that nature remains an active foundation of individuals’ lives.  This course is designed to give instructors the fundamental understanding that there is an essential, genetically-based human need and propensity to affiliate with “life and lifelike processes,” especially in the outdoors.  During this course, instructors will come to recognize that striving to utilize the natural environment in order to get individuals to reconnect with the nature is not a new idea, but is still a leap to work into the traditional classroom setting.  By utilizing both theoretically based information and trips into the natural environment, instructors will be given insight to the importance of exposing youth to these experiences.   This course is designed to take into account that many classroom students may have never had any previous (physical) exposure to the natural environment.  This course is limited to only 14 enrollees, as we will be entering into Public Lands and that is the permit limit.

Spanish

★Level 1: Spanish & Culture

Instructor: Janet Welsh Crossley

  • Credit: CALL 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15875
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00am-6:00pm
  • Audience: K-12

Using active engagement strategies and conversation, attendees will study and speak the Spanish language at a beginner level and develop insights into cultural differences.  This is an active approach for those needing foundational Spanish speaking skills to interact conversationally with students and their caretakers within a school. Focus will be on vocabulary, pronunciation of key phrases, simple Spanish syntax and basic conversational practice needed to communicate key messages to any age of Spanish-speaking students and their caretakers. This is intended for never-ever Spanish language learners or those who want a basic review in the language, and is applicable to classroom teachers, administrators or support staff who regularly interact with Spanish speakers. Teachers will leave with a variety of tools applicable to engaging ELL students in their core content instruction.

★Level II: Spanish & Culture Teaching Refresher

Instructor: Lidia Boyd

  • Credit: CALL 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15874
  • Classes: Thursday – Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

The purpose of this class is to refresh Spanish language and culture and use it in the classroom.  Using different activities and conversation, we will study the Spanish language and practice orally at an intermediate level. We will focus on expanding the vocabulary necessary for each teacher’s curriculum through activities proper to each classroom. Teachers will acquire a set of tools and strategies they will be able to use in their classroom, including the use of a variety of software and apps.   We will develop vocabulary acquisition, understanding of structures, enhance listening and comprehension skills, and practice communication skills within this very interactive learning environment. This class is not intended for beginners but rather for those who want a refresher on their Spanish skills and new ideas for using a second language in their classroom.

WEEK 2: June 15th - June 20th

Creative Writing

Creative Writing, Alternative Education and the Field Experience

Instructor: Molly Murfee

  • Credit: ENG 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $15 course fee, CRN 15895
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Secondary

Use creative writing and the field experience as inspiring tools for gathering information, processing emotions and finding a constructive, energizing and motivating outlet for interacting with the complex environmental issues of our time. Learn to connect to the natural world through the combined use of a Creative Writing Portfolio and field experiences. Incorporate experiential education, student-centered learning and interdisciplinary studies into a traditional classroom. Explore the effective writing techniques of creative non-fiction focused on nature and the environment. Each class is a full-day immersion into wilderness and includes freewriting exercises, author discussions and independent research. Approaches covered are useful in fostering skills of critical thinking, observation and research, exploring descriptive, narrative, reportive, persuasive, and poetic writing techniques, in addition to experimenting with writing that stirs emotion, appreciation and action. While perfect for English, composition and the natural sciences, techniques learned in this course can be applied to most any subject.

Education

★American Sign Language II: A Tool for Creative Classroom Communication

Instructor: Karen Immerso

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15896
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

American Sign Language II (ASL), considered a foreign language, a community language or a language of instruction, is being offered for teachers who have previous experience with ASL and are interested in pursuing greater mastery of these skills. This American Sign Language class will take you well beyond the basics in order to work more confidently with the language and find more applications for its use, especially as it relates to working with special needs students.  This course will also allow you to discover the creative dimensions of incorporating this language into your teaching. Lessons and practice sessions during this three-day class will review the basics of ASL, expand vocabulary, explore more of its uses in classroom situations and improve one’s receptive skills. Beyond learning more about the cultural aspects of working with a Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, participants will also step into the idea of ASL as a part of expanding one’s own social-emotional skills as well as encouraging better communication skills for the young people with whom they work day-to-day. Participants may come to a new level of expression and surely have fun within this truly “hands-on” learning opportunity.

★Applying G-Suite in Your Classroom

Instructors: Cindy McKee and Kathie Powell

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15897
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Once you learn the basics of Google's G-Suite for Education, you need the time and support to apply your new skills to your teaching practice. In this workshop, we will practice applying and implementing G-Suite tools to your real-life classroom. In addition, Cindy and Kathie will teach you some "bells and whistles" to make you more efficient and engage your students at a higher level. This course meets the requirements for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education for licensure hours by providing strategies to engage all learners, technology to aid in English language and content learning, G-Suite tools to effectively monitor students’ progress and develop formative and summative assessments, and other teaching strategies and materials for CLD students.

Communication is KEY: Build Community and Support for Your Classroom

Instructor: Cindy McKee

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15912
  • Classes: Thursday – Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12 and Administrators

You are guaranteed to walk out of this class with 10 ready-to-implement strategies that will improve your communication with your constituents and increase your classroom connections.  You will develop a communication plan for your class that will focus and streamline your interactions with families and the community. Learn how to create newsletters that parents read, manage photos, go paperless, leverage social media so it works for you and your learners, maintain an effective website, develop your own practice by creating PLCs, and much more!

Developing Storylines: Adapting Instruction to Address the Next Generation Science Standards

Instructor: Dr. Jeff Writer

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15910
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Learning is most effective when it is driven by the learner’s own questions. The practice of science fundamentally revolves around asking questions, yet traditional science curricula are often lacking in this area.  In recognition of this incongruity between how science is practiced and how science has been traditionally taught, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were developed and have been recently adopted by the State of Colorado. The purpose of this course is to support teachers in developing instructional strategies that engage students in asking and answering their questions about natural phenomena such as, “How do antibiotics become less efficient,” “Why do hailstorms occur only at certain times of the year,” or even “What limits the longevity of my cell phone battery?” This course will help teachers develop storylines appropriate for their grade level/curriculum. Storylines are a coherent set of lessons that provide students with the opportunity to ask questions and to use science and engineering practices to build deeper understanding of disciplinary core ideas and cross cutting concepts.

Hands-On STEAM Projects

Instructor: Rain Bodine

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15914
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Teachers will explore a variety of hands on STEAM projects built to enhance engagement in the classroom. All lessons can be adapted to a K-12 curriculum. Each of the creative projects incorporate one or more of the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. The projects include designing habitats and nests, animal and symmetry using tangrams, creative app explorations, pendulum construction and painting, 3D optical illusions, mathematical color theory, and geometric string art.  Teachers taking this course can expect to have a minimum of 4 projects and examples ready for lesson planning and classroom adaption.

★Literacy for Everyone: Resources and Strategies for Diverse Students Across the Curriculum

Instructors: Karen Hausdoerffer and Rita Merrigan

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, 15913
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

This course offers hands-on strategies to make children’s literature more accessible to CLD learners and to integrate more diverse literature into the classroom. Participants will try out games, classroom structures, discussion formats, art projects and theatre games to enliven literature for CLD students and talk about contemporary cultural issues around inclusion. Participants will bring their own questions and ideas for adapting these strategies to each unique learning setting. Through a survey of children’s literature of all levels, we will introduce exciting new trends in diverse publishing, a large sampling of diverse books of all levels and cross-curricular connections. We will discuss current issues in CLD literacy and ideas for including parents as literacy educators. We define CLD learners to include not only race and culture, but students representing neurodiversity, gender diversity and class diversity. Participants should come willing to move around, laugh, act, take risks and have fun together.

★Multi-Tiered Instruction Using Technology & Differentiation to Support All Students

Instructor: Dr. Tara Mason

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15903
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Through the lens of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), this course will develop educators understanding of multi-tiered systems of supports to serve all students in their K-12 programs. The course will delve deeply into linking interventions and assistive technology supports in order to provide enhancement, accessibility, and achievement for a continuum of learning needs emphasizing the needs of students served in special education and Culturally-Linguistic and/or Diverse programs.  Educators will learn about evidence-based interventions in the areas of literacy and mathematics. In addition, educators will learn ways to differentiate and accommodate learning with assistive technology supports in Chrome, iOS or other technology supports. Educators will build a multi-tiered lesson unit tied to their subject or grade level area and an assistive technology help guide as a final project in this course using one or more interventions to serve students in their classrooms served in special education and/or Culturally-linguistically diverse student programs.

Retreat, Reflect, Renew: Creative Modes of Reflective Learning for Teachers & Students

Instructor: Dr. Melanie Reaves

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $40 course fee, CRN 15904
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Reflection is essential to learning. This course covers theory, research and evidence-based methods for learning by reflecting on experiences. Reflective practices, such as writing, thinking through metaphors and collaboration will serve as pathways for learning techniques involving journaling, conversation and arts-based meaning-making (no previous art experience necessary). Teachers will leave having had time to synthesize theory and research in connection with their practice (retreat), create a collection of insights into their own teaching and learning (reflect), and develop a set of techniques to use with their students to teach them how to engage in reflective learning (renew).

Resilient Colorado: Natural Hazards Education for Secondary Science Classrooms

Instructor: Katya Schloesser

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 1 Credit, this course is offered at no cost (up to 21 participants) and is generously paid for by the Grant listed below, CRN 15898
  • Classes: Monday and Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Secondary

We invite secondary earth and environmental science teachers to learn a new place-based, NGSS aligned science curriculum on natural hazards. The curricular unit includes a lesson on natural hazards (wildfire, flood or drought) that uses current Colorado case studies and local datasets, a scenario-based role-play game, and lessons for students to develop resilience strategies for their hometown to present at a community expo. Instructional strategies include project-based learning, gamification, design thinking and community engaged learning. Additionally, the workshop will include a presentation from a Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) scientist on natural hazards in Colorado. The CIRES Education and Outreach team at CU Boulder developed the curriculum, which is part of a program called the Hazard Education Awareness and Resilience Task (HEART) Force. HEART Force is funded by a NOAA Environmental Literacy Grant and is designed specifically for rural Colorado classrooms to increase students’ understanding of natural hazards and community preparedness, and encourages students to act to increase their community’s resilience to natural hazards. The grant covers registration for this course, as well as provides and optional stipend for teachers who would like to teach the curriculum and hold a community resilience expo in their community. 

Storytelling as Innovation

Instructor: Beth Tagliareni

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15900
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

Nothing touches humans like a story. Through the centuries as a species, stories have been used to pass down knowledge and teach the next generation. While the method of story delivery has changed, the power of teaching through story is a constant. This course will examine the research behind the effectiveness of storytelling. Elements of a good story and tools for digital storytelling in class will then be explored. Platforms for sharing student stories, including digital portfolios, will also be explored.

Teaching Next Generation Science Standards with Project Learning Tree

Instructor: Danielle Ardrey

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 1 Credit, $170, CRN 15902
  • Classes: Friday and Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Elementary

Looking for resources to teach the Next Generation Science Standards? Project Learning Tree (PLT) is an award-winning environmental education program built on shared foundational principles with NGSS.  PLT helps develop students’ knowledge, skills and appreciation of the environment, teaching them how to think, not what to think. The program's ready to go lessons contain cross cutting concepts that readily link to the Next Generation Science Standards. PLT uses phenomenon-based learning and promotes the development of scientifically literate citizens through interdisciplinary, hands-on learning. Course participants will dive into PLT’s K-8 guide, gaining access to its 96 easy to use activities and a plan for implementation in your curriculum.

Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education: Infant/Toddler Theory and Practice

Instructors: Corrine Jaeger and Jennifer Kennedy

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 3 Credits, $510, CRN 15901
  • Classes: Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Infant/Toddler/Pre-K teachers

Presents an overview of theories, applications (including observations) and issues pertinent to infant and toddler development in group and/or family settings. Includes state requirements for licensing, health, safety and nutrition. Focuses on birth through age three. Understanding the importance of infant and toddler development is essential knowledge for all early childhood educators. This course provides participants with a deep understanding of theories around development that will help support all ECE teachers.   This course is equivalent to ECE 111 and will meet state requirements for ECE Childcare Licensing.

Early Childhood Education: Introduction

Instructor: Danette Williams

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 3 Credits, $510, CRN 15911
  • Classes: Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Pre-K

This course provides an introduction to early childhood education (ECE) addressing ages 0-8.  Participants will learn the eight key areas of professional knowledge:  Professionalism, Child Growth and Development, Health, Nutrition and Safety, Developmentally Appropriate Practices, Guidance, Diversity, Family and Community Relationships, and Administration and Supervision.  Participants will learn strategies to help children thrive in different areas of development and learning, as well as developing their role as the teacher and how they influence student learning.  This course is equivalent to ECE 101: Introduction to Early Childhood Education, and will meet state requirements for ECE Childcare Licensing.  

Environmental Science

2020 Western Rivers Teacher Workshop- River as Text: Ecology

Instructor: Sarah Johnson

  • Credit: ENVS 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $15 course fee, CRN 15905
  • Classes: Monday - Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: 3rd-10th grade teachers

Learn how to utilize rivers and riparian habitat as the context to meet the Colorado 2020 Science standards (NGSS) through observations, explorations, discussions and journaling to create three-dimensional, phenomenon and problem-driven science learning experiences. During this field-based course, participants will explore the three major components of a river ecosystem: aquatic life, water quality and riparian habitat as well and the Colorado In-stream flow program. Inter-disciplinary field experiences include field trips to local riverside parks, Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery and Curecanti National Recreation Area. Curriculum resources will be shared from BEETLES, Aquatic WILD, Project WET, and Denver Water’s Water Education Resource Guide. Participants will also create an online Google My Maps river field trip asset map for their school using tools from Jane Goodall’s Roots and Shoots curriculum. 

2020 Western Rivers Teacher Workshop- Water in the West

Instructor: Sarah Johnson

  • Credit: ENVS 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15906
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Secondary

Learn how to incorporate the complexities of water management in the West into your curriculum through cross-curricular field and classroom learning. Through the use of visible thinking, questioning, inquiry, deliberation and reflecting, participants will explore western water management, water law and watershed geography through the C3 Framework for Social Studies and Colorado 2020 Social Studies standards. We will explore and learn how to use Library of Congress teaching tools, Project WET: Discover A Watershed, Population Education and other proven teaching resources in your classrooms. Participants will also create an ESRI Story Map using online GIS tools to explore and explain water management concepts and corresponding geography more closely. Field experiences visiting Blue Mesa Dam, a Morrow Point Reservoir overlook, Taylor Reservoir and time at Gunnison Mountain Park.

History

Teaching Religious Beliefs, Cultures, Histories & Current Events with Objectivity and Inclusivity

Instructor: Dr. Camarin Porter

Credit: HIST 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15894
Classes: Thursday – Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Audience: K-12

Teachers and administrators foster classroom and school environments that protect students from bias or intolerance based on their religious and cultural beliefs or backgrounds. That mandate for inclusivity often translates, though, into an aversion to discussing faith communities or the general nature of religious belief and practice out of concern for “getting it wrong.” In those cases, students may assume that religious belief and global faith traditions are too taboo to study or difficult to learn. This course will provide an objective framework and vocabulary for discussing and teaching religion in any field including History, Government and Social Studies. It will draw on the anthropology, philosophy and sociology of religion to understand how religious beliefs function in society. Participants will strengthen their confidence in teaching religious history or current conflicts, or struggles for rights and tolerance. They will learn how to teach “snapshots” of faith traditions that avoid overgeneralizations or stereotypes.

Outdoor Recreation

Experiential Education: Combining Classroom & Field Based Learning

Instructor: Karen Immerso

  • Credit: ROE 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15909
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

An interdisciplinary experience including experiential components for both classroom and “field” settings.   Within the many concepts of Experiential Education (service learning, expeditionary learning, project- and place-based learning, adventure and outdoor education), we will explore different pedagogies that fit each participants’ interest, and discover ways to create a new classroom culture that expands on students’ social-emotional skills. The wide range of options in the Gunnison Valley for “field-based learning” environments (campus, our small town, rural setting, mountain- river- forest and open sage country), invite us to visit surroundings, practice ways to cover classroom content, specific subject areas and curricular topics more experientially.  We will discuss learning styles, EE history and theory. Participants will design lesson plans to fit the group’s learning needs, interests and motivations. We will share ideas for developing multi-age and age-appropriate experiential lessons, student leadership, the teacher as facilitator and how to link curriculum and outdoor activities. Expect moderate physical exertion though no previous outdoor experience is required.

Place-Based Learning Within the Field Seminar

Instructor: Derek Harwell

  • Credit: ROE 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $25 course fee, CRN 15899
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: Secondary

Throughout the history of education, place has been at the core of both curriculum and pedagogy.  Through a classroom/field hybrid course, participants will explore the components of Place-Based Learning and how various aspects can be applied within the unique characteristics of your school and community settings.  Western is uniquely situated within the Gunnison River Watershed.  This waterway is fed by a variety of streams, creeks and rivers originating from the crest of the western slope.  The watershed supplies Blue Mesa, the largest body of water in Colorado, before continuing downstream to become a major contributor to the Colorado River.  Through the lens of our local watershed, we will explore ways in which to see, experience and understand aspects of our larger world from a deep engagement with the local.  This course will take a multi-disciplinary approach including Science, Art, Politics and Literature as the foundations from which to explore the landscape.

Politics and Government

From Young Republicans to Greta Thunberg: Developing Young Leaders

Instructor: Dr. Maria Struble

  • Credit: POLS 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $10 course fee, CRN 15908
  • Classes: Thursday - Saturday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

This course takes its inspiration from the belief that helping youth develop leadership skills is fundamentally our main opportunity to create the kind of peaceful, collaborative, informed and sustainable world we all say we want to live in.  The basic premise of the course will be that in order to help nurture young leaders, educators (and others) will be well-advised to work on the following: 1) teach students about confidence 2) be a great example 3) take part in youth engagement programs 4) teach kids to be organized 5) encourage them to make the world a better place 6) explain that failure isn’t always a bad thing and 7) allow them to make their own decisions.  As a parent of two young boys, this course’s instructor is passionately interested in helping nurture caring, empathetic, informed, critical and hard-working future world citizens.  This course is an attempt to think through some of the ways this can be done at the K-12 level, by engaging with some hands-on exercises and ideas that can be brought back to the classroom.  The hope is that by the end of the course educators can leave reassured that there are things that instructors can do to help our children and students be the kinds of people who lead by example, and not just high achieving, stressed-out unhappy young adults.  At its heart, this course is interested in engaging issues of social-emotional learning, socio-economic disparities, resilience, self-directed learning and collaboration. 

Simulating Model United Nations for the K-12 Classroom

Instructor: Dr. Maria Struble

  • Credit: POLS 510, 2 Credits, $340, CRN 15907
  • Classes: Monday – Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Audience: K-12

In this course, the participant will simulate the workings of the United Nations.  Teachers will be assigned some background information to look over before the beginning of class as well as a Security Council country they will represent and once class begins, they will simulate being diplomats from an assigned country.  Students will work in groups of two and will have to argue on an issue, while trying to pass relevant legislature (called “resolutions” at the UN).  Teachers will work on public speaking, will learn a lot about a specific issue of international relevance, develop new and interactive ways of bringing said issue to the attention of others and produce a working piece of legislature they can then continue working on with their students.  The course is designed as a highly hands-on, engaging and interactive experience and will also involve two guest speakers on our topic.  The instructor for this course already supervises a very successful Western Colorado University Model UN team and wishes to share her excitement for Model UN with you. 

Additional Course Offerings

Earthship Biotecture Academy for Teachers

Earthship Biotecture Academy for Teachers

Instructor: Lauren Anderson

  • Credit: ENVS 510, 3 Credits, $510 + Earthship course fee, CRN 15915
  • Dates: June 1 - 26
  • Location: Taos, NM
  • Audience: K-12

The Earthship Biotecture Academy is an intense, immersive experience that takes place near Taos, NM. The Academy is in session for four, six-day weeks. Sessions typically follow a schedule of mornings as lecture-based learning and afternoons of field-based learning on various jobsites. The academy provides extensive knowledge of solar energy production, rainwater capture, greywater treatment and crop production in an earthship, as well as a thorough explanation of the six necessary systems to support the human experience. Lectures and discussions also involve community building and collaborative techniques. Experts in the field, including those with more than 45 years of earthship experience, such as Mike Reynolds, and an international group of academy teachers provide classroom and field instruction. Teachers gain hands-on experience in field settings which explain the systems and how to maintain working order in an earthship and will participate in the building of an earthship.

Education and the Cultural Arts in Central Europe

Education and the Cultural Arts in Central Europe

Instructor: Dr. Jeffrey Taylor

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 3 Credits ($510) + Course Fee ($540) = $1050, CRN 15920
  • Dates: June 7 - June 21
  • Location: Central Europe (Vienna, Prague, Budapest)

Experience three of Europe’s most stunningly beautiful cities.  Vienna, Prague and Budapest have been the seats of empires and kingdoms, and they remain lasting testimonies of history’s sweep. Some of the last millennium’s most dramatic events occurred in these three cities and some Europe's most beautiful art and architecture reside in them. We will spend four full days in each of these cities with visits to palaces, cityscapes and museums where we will explore a complex legacy of cultures, peoples, religions and ideologies.  Please note that, in addition to paying the tuition and course fee, each student will be expected to book travel accommodations on their own and incur the following minimum expenses: approximately $400 for lodging, $600 for food, $250 for ground transportation, and $1,250 for round-trip flight from Denver (or some other U.S. city) to Vienna. The instructor is a former European tour guide and will gladly assist all students find lodging solutions that meet their budgets and expectations.

Leave No Trace Trainer Course for Educators

Leave No Trace Trainer Course for Educators

Instructor: Sarah R. Johnson

  • Credit: ROE 510, 1 Credit, $170 + $10 course fee, CRN 15916
  • Date:  August 6 - 8, 2020
  • Location: Marble, CO
  • Audience: K-12; Outdoor Educator Leaders

This field training at the Chapin Wright Marble Basecamp near Marble, Colorado is developed by the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics, which aims for participants to learn Leave No Trace skills and ethics as well as techniques for effectively sharing these low impact practices with students of all ages. This course is specifically for educators who take youth outdoors for single or multi-day courses.  Research has shown that this course significantly improves participant knowledge and understanding of how Leave No Trace protects the outdoor places we love. Participants will prepare a lesson prior to the training to teach during the course (topics organized by the instructor). Participants will either need to hike along the road approximately 1 mile gaining 800 feet from the parking area to the basecamp, or a high clearance 4-wheel drive vehicle is necessary to access the site. Participants must bring their own food and camping equipment.

Public Lands Exploration in the Gunnison Valley: Designations, History and Today

Public Lands for Secondary Educators: Designations, History and Today

Instructor: Sarah R. Johnson

  • Credit: ENVS 510, 2 Credits, $340 + $15 course fee, CRN 15917
  • Dates: July 28-30
  • Location: Gunnison National Forest; Curecanti National Recreation Area
  • Audience: Secondary; Community learners; Higher Education

Expand your knowledge of public lands in America. Community members and educators are invited to participate in this interactive, discussion-based learning opportunity to gain a stronger understanding of federal land designations, history of these lands and the context in which these places were protected. The course aims to build connections between people and America’s public lands as well as awareness that the lands and waters we love today were once, and still are, Indigenous lands. Each day, field trips to local BLM, US Forest Service, National Park and Colorado state lands will expose students to the agencies and the professionals who manage them. Students will explore the many uses and benefits of public lands, as well as the threats they face locally and nationally. Students will also collect citizen science land cover and tree data for NASA’s Globe Observer.

★SPAIN! Land of Many Cultures: A CLD Travel Course

★SPAIN! Land of Many Cultures: A CLD Travel Course

Instructor: Rain Bodine

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 3 Credits, $510 + $5275, CRN 15919
  • Dates: June 26 - July 6
  • Location: Spain
  • Audience: K-12

Embark on a trip of a lifetime while gaining 3 CLD credits! Immerse yourself and your senses in the culture and beauty of Spain!  This course offers endless possibilities for classroom connections and expanding perspectives, plus personal growth and experience.  This class will incorporate prior research by each individual teacher that connects their content area to the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse learners. Then we will bring our foundation of study to the cultural source where we will see, hear, feel and taste our surroundings firsthand in Spain!  During the tour, teachers will journal and reflect on their observations and connections.  Post trip, teachers will develop lesson plans/curriculum that incorporates their authentic experiences and research relevant to their classroom composition and goals.  The trip cost is $5275 which includes: Flights, Transportation, Accommodations, Breakfasts and 5 regional dinners, 24/7 tour director plus expert local guides and entrance fees, top rated emergency services and support through EF Tours. Obtain details to register and pay for the travel portion of the course from the EF website, and visit Western Extended Studies to obtain credit and register. Registration through the above link by March 15th.

The World is a Classroom

The World is a Classroom

Instructor: Steve Foster

  • Credit: EDUC 510, 3 Credits, $510 + $2,299, CRN 15918
  • Dates: July 5 - 18
  • Location: Guatemala

This travel course will help educators (as learners) develop a deeper understanding of the foundations of language and culture as part of a two-week immersion program in Guatemala –exclusively for educators. The cultural immersion component will focus on language and culture – specifically for the purpose of enhancing classroom instruction.  This learning opportunity will provide the student with hands-on learning experiences and activities that can be easily duplicated in the traditional classroom. Students will engage in conversations related to the places they visit and apply learning through various activities based exclusively on the sites visited.  Included in this trip experience is a family homestay with 3 homecooked meals per day, private Spanish classes, as well as many other cultural excursions.  Please note, international airfare is not included in tuition.  Register and pay for the travel course directly through spanish4educators.org.  Register and pay for the credit through Extended Studies.

COURSE CANCELLATION POLICY

Extended Studies reserves the right to cancel courses based on low enrollments. Early registration is encouraged in order to accurately evaluate enrollments. Extended Studies will begin cancelling courses due to low enrollments (typically less than 5 students) the week of May 25. Participants enrolled in courses that are cancelled will be contacted and issued full refunds for the canceled course(s). We encourage participants to select a different class. No refunds will be given after May 29, 2020.