Education (EDUC)

EDUCATION (EDUC)

The Education Department at Western State Colorado University is accredited by the Colorado Department of Education and the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. The Education Department currently maintains a 100 percent pass rate for licensing assessments for Colorado educators, as reported to Title II for those who complete the program. The faculty of the Education Department is committed to creating a community of teachers who are competent in their subject matter, pedagogical content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and teaching skills. Students develop a professional knowledge base and research and reflect upon the implications of educational best practices that extend well beyond traditional educational goals of individual achievement. It is necessary for pre-service teachers to understand and accept the responsibility for creating a community that recognizes and appreciates diversity, and for which individual members possess the content knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to think critically, solve problems, and make responsible decisions.

Criteria for admission to the Teacher Licensure program:

Education students must be accepted into the Teacher Licensure program prior to taking EDUC 340 and before becoming eligible for placement in their teaching residency. All applicants receive a holistic application review by the admissions committee in the content area for which the application is received. Applicants are evaluated according to criteria established for the specific licensure track. Details, including application deadlines, are listed on the undergraduate Education program’s website: Link to Education Programs page.

FACULTY

Associate Professor Gaye R. Jenkins; Assistant Professors Brian Coppess and Ian P. Renga;

Senior Lecturer Brooke M. Hanks; Lecturers Caroline Forrest, Jeffery Hulbert, and Cori Woytek

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAMS

 

Elementary Education Major with emphasis in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education: Comprehensive Major The Elementary Education Major prepares students to be effective K-6 educators and is aligned with the Colorado P-12 Academic Standards, the Educator Licensure Act of 1991, Senate Bill 10-191 of 2013, and the Colorado Educator Effectiveness Rubric. The depth and breadth of the Elementary Education Major curriculum is designed to prepare students to successfully teach in a Colorado standards-based classroom and offers preparation for entry into other education and job training opportunities. In addition to a Colorado Initial Elementary Education License, students completing the Elementary Education Major will be eligible to earn an added endorsement in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Education. All CLD endorsement standard requirements are met in the Education coursework. The Elementary Education Major requires students to complete all requirements of the Licensure Program, including 36 credits of Education (EDUC) coursework. The major requires students to successfully complete 87 credits of interdisciplinary content coursework, which includes the University’s General Education requirements (nine credits of essential skills and 26 credits of Liberal Arts coursework).

 

Comprehensive Program

Elementary Education Content Core

ART 105  Introduction to Art

3 cr

COM 202  Academic Writing and Inquiry

3 cr

ECON 201  Macroeconomics

3 cr

ENG 102  Academic Writing

3 cr

ENG 205  Introduction to Creative Writing

3 cr

ENG 220  Grammar and the English Language

3 cr

ESS 353  Coordinated School Health and Activity Programs

2 cr

GEOG 120  Introduction to Human Geography

3 cr

GEOG 250  Geography of North America

3 cr

HIST 126  US History to 1865

3 cr

HIST 260  History of Latin America

3 cr

HIST 327  Colorado History

3 cr

MATH 113  Statistical Thinking

3 cr

MATH 140  College Algebra

3 cr

MATH 209  Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

3 cr

MATH 210  Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

3 cr

MUSIC 100  Fundamentals of Music

3 cr

POLS 117  Introduction to Political Ideas

3 cr

POLS 180  Introduction to American Politics

3 cr

POLS 282  Issues in State and Local Government

3 cr

SCI 110  Habitable Planet (with Laboratories)

4 cr

SCI 111  Nature of Science

1 cr

SCI 120  Living Planet (with Laboratories)

4 cr

SCI 210  Dynamic Planet (with Laboratories)

4 cr

 

Elementary Education Supporting Courses

One of the following:

 

COM 235  Fundamentals of Acting

3 cr

COM 274  Public Relations Communication

3 cr

COM 371  Small Group and Conflict Management

3 cr

One of the following:

 

SPAN 101  Elementary Spanish I

3 cr

SPAN 102  Elementary Spanish II

3 cr

One of the following:

 

PSY 270  Developmental Psychology

3 cr

ESS 275  Motor Development and Learning

3 cr

Two of the following. One course must be at the 300 level or above:

 

ECON 202  Microeconomics

3 cr

ENG 250  Critical Approaches to Literature

3 cr

ENG 370  Myth and Culture

3 cr

GEOG 351  Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean

3 cr

POLS 360  American Foreign Policy

3 cr

ROE 235  Foundations of Teaching Environmental Education

3 cr

ROE 391  Experiential Education Theory and Pedagogy

3 cr

SOC 101  Introduction to Sociology

3 cr

 

Elementary Licensure

Students seeking Elementary Licensure (grades K-6) must complete the interdisciplinary requirements of the Elementary Education Major, all other University requirements, and the Elementary Licensure requirements set forth by the Colorado Department of Education. Students pursuing Elementary Licensure must meet all requirements for admission to the Teacher Licensure Program before taking EDUC 340 and being eligible to enter the residency year. Students must complete all coursework required within the academic major prior to beginning the clinical residency and complementary Education coursework, or have documented content and education advisor permission. The clinical residency experience begins each fall for one full year, and students may be placed in more than one K-6 classroom. Students have both in-state and out-of-state placement options. After attending the summer session orientation to the residency program on campus, students are highly encouraged to follow the K-6 school year calendar for the school in which they are placed, not the Western academic calendar (i.e. beginning on the day the mentor teacher reports for duty, take K-6 school holidays, participate in K-6 school professional development and in-service opportunities, end the final day teachers are required to report, etc.). Master mentor teachers are selected carefully to ensure that Western students completing their clinical residencies have strong professional role models. The potential mentor teacher will self-assess his or her knowledge of the education standards and standard elements. Students accepting these placements are expected to successfully complete the year-long clinical residency, in order to be recommended for Initial Licensure. Students who do not successfully complete the year-long residency will be withdrawn from the Teacher Licensure Program and must appeal to the Performance Review Committee for readmission. The other education courses in the program are offered online throughout the year. The residency for Elementary Licensure must be completed in a K-6 classroom and students are expected to work cooperatively 24 hours per week with qualified mentor teachers. During this year-long clinical residency, the student is applying and extending the pedagogical knowledge that he or she is learning in the Education courses. To be recommended for an Initial Elementary License, the student resident must perform at “3, Proficiency” level in all relevant standard elements in the elementary (K-6) classroom. Student residents must demonstrate the ability to apply the standard/standard element in an elementary classroom setting, assess K-6 student learning, and evaluate their own teaching performance. The level expected of well prepared, first year teachers is “3, Proficiency.”

 

The Elementary Licensure Program requires 36 credits of Education coursework and the Gateway course:

EDUC 000  Education Gateway Course

0 cr

EDUC 102  Issues and Trends in American Education

3 cr

EDUC 316  Introduction to Language Acquisition for Linguistically Diverse Students

3 cr

EDUC 340  Application of Pedagogy and Practice

3 cr

EDUC 400  Foundations of Literacy: Phonology and Linguistics

3 cr

EDUC 401  Assessment for Prevention and Intervention

3 cr

EDUC 402  Reading Comprehension, Vocabulary, and Fluency

3 cr

EDUC 404  Creating Positive Learning Environments

3 cr

EDUC 405  Data-driven Instructional Practices

3 cr

EDUC 413  Mathematical Investigations

3 cr

EDUC 417  Teaching and Assessing Writing with the Linguistically Diverse Student in Mind

3 cr

EDUC 459  Elementary Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Student Teaching (taken twice)

3 cr

 

Secondary and K-12 Licensure

A student seeking licensure as a Secondary teacher (grades 7-12) or K-12 teacher must complete an appropriate academic major, all other University requirements, and the appropriate Secondary or K-12 Licensure requirements. The Secondary academic major may be: Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, Geology, History, or Politics and Government. The K-12 Academic Major may be: Art, Exercise and Sport Science, Music, or Spanish. Students must complete all coursework required within the academic major prior to beginning the year of Education coursework and complementary residency, or have content advisor and Education advisor permission. Students have their Degree Works or Unofficial transcripts signed by the content advisor, indicating all coursework will be completed before residency begins. Students pursuing the Secondary or K-12 Licensure option must meet all of the requirements for admission to the Teacher Licensure Program before taking EDUC 340 and being eligible to enter the residency year. The clinical residency experience begins each fall for one full year, and students may be placed in more than one Secondary or K-12 classroom. Students have both in-state and out-of-state placement options. After attending the summer session orientation to the residency program on campus, students are highly encouraged follow the Secondary or K-12 school year calendar for the school in which they are placed, not the Western academic calendar (i.e. beginning on the day the mentor teacher reports for duty, take Secondary or K-12 school holidays, participate in Secondary or K-12 school professional development and in-service opportunities, end the final day teachers are required to report, etc.). Master mentor teachers are selected carefully to ensure that Western students completing their clinical residencies have strong professional role models. The potential mentor teacher’s principal will assess the mentor teacher’s knowledge of the education standards and standard elements. Students accepting these placements are expected to successfully complete the year-long clinical residency, in order to be recommended for Initial Licensure. Students who do not successfully complete the year-long residency will be withdrawn from the Education Program and must appeal to the Performance Review Committee for readmission. The other education courses in the program are offered online throughout the residency year. The residency for Secondary or K-12 Licensure must be completed in a Secondary or K-12 classroom and students are expected to work cooperatively 24 hours per week with qualified mentor teachers. During this year-long clinical residency, the student is applying and extending the pedagogical knowledge that he or she is learning in the Education courses. To be recommended for an Initial Secondary or K-12 License, the student resident must perform at “3, Proficiency” level in all relevant standard elements in the Secondary or K-12 classroom. Student residents must demonstrate the ability to apply the standard/standard element in an elementary classroom setting, assess Secondary or K-12 student learning, and evaluate their own teaching performance. The level expected of well prepared, first year teachers is “3, Proficiency.”

The Secondary (with the exception of students seeking Secondary English Licensure) and K-12 Licensure Program requires 30 credits of Education coursework:

EDUC 000  Education Gateway Course

0 cr

EDUC 340  Application of Pedagogy and Practice

3 cr

EDUC 403  Instruction and Assessment in the Content Area

3 cr

EDUC 404  Creating Positive Learning Environments

3 cr

EDUC 405  Data-driven Instructional Practices

3 cr

EDUC 406  Content Area Literacy

3 cr

EDUC 407  Maximizing Learning Through 21st Century Skills

3 cr

EDUC 420  Application of Classroom Strategies to Engage All Learners

3 cr

EDUC 424  Differentiation: Applying Learner-Centered Instruction

3 cr

Appropriate Student Teaching Course:

 

EDUC 409  Secondary Student Teaching (taken twice)

3 cr

EDUC 410  K-12 Student Teaching (taken twice )

3 cr

 

The Secondary English Licensure Program requires 30 credits of Education coursework:

EDUC 000  Education Gateway Course

0 cr

EDUC 340  Application of Pedagogy and Practice

3 cr

EDUC 401  Assessment for Prevention and Intervention

3 cr

EDUC 402  Reading Comprehension, Vocabulary, and Fluency

3 cr

EDUC 403  Instruction and Assessment in the Content Area

3 cr

EDUC 404  Creating Positive Learning Environments

3 cr

EDUC 405  Data-driven Instructional Practices

3 cr

EDUC 407  Maximizing Learning Through 21st Century Skills

3 cr

EDUC 408  Teaching Writing with the Brain in Mind

3 cr

EDUC 409  Secondary Student Teaching (taken twice)

3 cr

 

Student Disposition and Performance Assessment.

During the semester in which students are enrolled in EDUC 000 Education Gateway Course, EDUC 340 Application of Pedagogy and Practice, and the clinical residency (Student Teaching), students are evaluated by the Education faculty and K-12 teacher mentor(s) in terms of their potential for becoming effective educators. This process of evaluating professional teaching dispositions is used for screening Education students for support needs and/or continuation in the Teacher Licensure Program.

Recommendation for Initial Licensure. 

Students must meet the following requirements during the last semester of their clinical residency year:

1. Successfully complete all Education coursework and the responsibilities of a clinical resident according to the Education  Department’s Professionalism Standards and Guidelines;

2. Perform at a minimum “3, Proficiency” on each relevant standard element as evaluated by mentor teachers, clinical residency supervisors, and/or course instructors.

Upon satisfactory completion of program requirements, the graduate must apply for licensure from the Colorado Department of Education within five years immediately following program completion.

 

Education Department Performance Review Committee and Process.

Throughout the time a student spends in the Teacher Licensure Program, he or she is evaluated and assessed by Education Department faculty, Clinical Coaches, Regional Coordinators and Mentor Teachers, in respect to performance, disposition, motivation, and demonstrated potential as a teacher. If issues surface concerning behaviors or dispositions, the Performance Review Committee begins a review process. This process has three purposes: 1) to act as a screening and counseling review, 2) to resolve a problematic situation, and 3) to provide an opportunity for faculty and students to develop a professional growth plan. Evidence of unsatisfactory performance, disposition, motivation, or demonstrated potential may result in withdrawal from the Program. A student who does not pass each Education course with at least a “C-” has one semester (or until the next time the semester course is offered) to remove the “D” or “F” with a grade of “C-” or above; or be withdrawn from the Program. Before admission to the Teacher Licensure Program, students must complete all prerequisite Education courses required for Licensure with a “C-” or above, and have an overall GPA of 2.75 or above. Anyone who fails two or more courses in the Education Department is withdrawn from the Program.

 

Performance Review Committee and Process.

Students who appeal Program policies and procedures must abide by the Performance Review Committee process. This process involves submitting materials to the Performance Review Committee for review. These materials include:

1. Statement of the problem, and a plan for correcting the problem;

2. Copy of the student’s transcript(s) and current course schedule;

3. Additional materials supporting the student’s appeal; and

4. Additional materials requested by the Performance Review Committee.