Courses

ECON 201 MACROECONOMICS

An introduction to the methods, models, and approaches used by economists to analyze and interpret events and policies related to the overall operation of the economy. The course endeavors to make sense of unemployment, inflation, recessions, debt and deficits, economic growth, the expanding role of the Federal Reserve, and policies to provide stability to the economy. Additional attention is given to the making of economic policy in an era of globalization. Finally, students are exposed to multiple schools of thought regarding macroeconomic reasoning. Prerequisite: ACT math score of 19 or above; SAT math score of 460 or above; pass MATH 099; or Accuplacer Elementary Algebra test score of 85 or higher, or college-level math requirement with a minimum grade of "C-." Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 102.

ECON 202 MICROECONOMICS

The theory of microeconomics makes use of the tools of marginal cost-benefit analysis to provide a framework for the economic analysis of decision-making. The focus is on the choices of individual firms and consumers, and the resultant outcomes in individual markets. The social implications of the functioning of competitive markets are examined, as well as the causes of market failure and the potential roles of government in correcting them. Prerequisite: ACT math score of 19 or above; SAT math score of 460 or above; pass MATH 099; or Accuplacer Elementary Algebra test score of 85 or higher, or college-level math requirement with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 215 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

A presentation of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists to examine and assess environmental issues, conflicts, and policies. Students are asked to use market analysis, externality analysis, cost-benefit analysis, instrument choice models, and market and non-market valuation techniques to investigate issues such as air and water quality, global warming, toxic substances, wilderness designation, and sustainable development plans. Prerequisites: MATH 105, MATH, 131, MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 216 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

An introduction to descriptive statistics and statistical inference, with application in business, including hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and simple regression analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 301 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

An analysis of competing theories about the overall functioning of economies including both growth and stabilization policies. Alternative models are examined at the levels of assumptions, mechanics, dynamics, and policy implications. Theories are examined within their historical context and the sets of problems faced by the theorists. Students are asked to engage, analyze, interpret and provide a course of action for real-world cases. Prerequisites: ECON 201; ECON 202; and MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 302 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

Intermediate Microeconomics extends the analysis of individual economic behavior and the functioning of markets learned in ECON 202 by incorporating the more sophisticated microeconomic models used in more advanced economic analysis. Topics include the theories of the consumer and the firm, the functioning of market, and the impact of market structure on price formation. Prerequisites: ECON 202; MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201 recommended.

ECON 303 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND GLOBALIZATION

An exploration of economic, political, and social effects of globalization. This is examined from the perspectives of trade, development, finance, and the environment. The first half of the course focuses on the impacts of international trade. This includes preferential trading relations, protectionism, global trade agreements, competitiveness, and possible conflicts between trade and social objectives. The second half of the course focuses on international monetary relations and regimes. This includes understanding the balance of payments, exchange rate determination, currency crises, and international debt. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201; ECON 202 recommended.

ECON 315 LABOR ECONOMICS

The central questions in the field of labor economics are how wages are determined, and why a market economy provides such a vast range of possible rewards to human labor. To answer them, this course examines the role of market forces (the supply of and demand for labor) as well as that of social, political, and economic institutions. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202; ECON 201 recommended.

ECON 316 ECONOMETRICS

The application of advanced statistical methods and modeling to an empirical understanding of economic issues. Combines elements of statistical reasoning with economic theory and provides an excellent opportunity to combine concepts learned in previous economics courses. Topics covered include multiple regression analysis, model specification, dummy variables, multi-collinearity heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, limited dependent variables, simultaneity, time series, forecasting, and methodological issues. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a 'C-' or better; ECON 201; ECON 202; and ECON 216 or MATH 213 with a 'C' or better.

ECON 317 ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC POLICY

An examination of the field of public economics, the branch of economics concerned with the reasons for market failure (monopoly, public goods, externalities, information asymmetry) and the potential for government policies to correct them. The application of the tools of economic analysis to understanding the causes of and potential solutions to social problems of current interest are emphasized. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202; ECON 201 recommended.

ECON 319 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION

A study of the branch of economics that analyzes the performance of industries in their role as producers of goods and services. Provides tools for analyzing and evaluating interactions between market structure (the number and size of firms in an industry), firm conduct, and industry performance. The role of government, through antitrust and other regulation, in improving the efficiency of industries and thus the economic system as a whole, is also considered. In addition, the theoretical tools of industrial analysis are used to perform case studies of actual industries. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202.

ECON 350 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

An examination of the development of economic thought and economic methodology from the pre-capitalist era to the present, with emphasis on placing the development of economic theory into its historical and political context. Major topics include the early classical school (Smith, Ricardo, Marx), the rise of modern neoclassical economics, and critical responses to mainstream theory. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201; and ECON 202.

ECON 361 MONEY, BANKING, AND FINANCIAL MARKETS

A survey of the core topics relating to the monetary sector of the economy. This includes an examination of the role and nature of money, financial institutions and markets, banking structure and regulation, determinants of interest rates, central bank policy, exchange rates, and the international monetary system. Attention is also given to particular monetary episodes such as the Great Depression, the Latin American debt crisis, the collapse of the Mexican Peso, and the Asian monetary collapse. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201.

ECON 370 NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS

A study of the efficient and equitable use of society's scarce natural resources. This course discusses the application of economic theory to natural resource problems, such as externalities and resource extraction. Particular attention will be placed on Western United States issues, including water, energy, mineral extraction, forestry and public land use. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202 or ECON 215.

ECON 397 SPECIAL TOPICS, ECONOMICS

Prerequisite: overall GPA of 2.500 or higher, or department chair permission.

ECON 476 AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

An inquiry into sources and character of American economic development. A survey is provided of several key moments in American political economy such as the market revolution, reconstruction, populism, progressivism, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and globalization. Students are asked to engage the ideas, social movements, and institutions that have shaped the modern American economy. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

ECON 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: overall GPA of 2.500 or higher, or department chair permission.

ECON 497 SPECIAL TOPICS, ECONOMICS

Prerequisite: overall GPA of 2.500 or higher, or department chair permission.

ECON 498 INCOME DISTRIBUTION, POVERTY AND WEALTH

A seminar-style examination of the causes and consequences of historical trends in income and wealth distribution in the United States, concentrating especially on the trend toward increasing inequality that began in the 1970s. Topics include: empirical analysis of distributional data; causal analysis based on both microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis; the roles of institutional change, social attitudes, and government policy; and both positive and normative evaluations of the economic and social consequences. This course fulfills the Economics Capstone Requirement.

ECON 499 INTERNSHIP IN ECONOMICS

The Economics Internship gives Economics majors who have completed 18 credits of economics the opportunity to apply their analytical skills in the service of businesses, government, and the community. Prerequisite: 18 credits of Economics courses including ECON 201; ECON 202; ECON 216 or MATH 213; and instructor permission.