Courses

BIOL 120 STUDIES IN BIOLOGY

An introduction to selected biological topics and the methods of science through an exploration of current topics such as evolution, bioethics and conservation biology. Students may only take this course once for credit.

BIOL 130 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY

An introduction to basic biological principles as they apply to interactions between organisms and their environment. Consideration is given to biotic and abiotic interactions, energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, population growth, biodiversity, basic cell biology, genetics, and evolution with a special emphasis on human impacts on these biological systems. This course establishes a strong foundation in applied biology from a scientific perspective.

BIOL 135 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY

An experimental approach in both the field and Laboratory to explore fundamental biological principles including biotic and abiotic interactions, energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, population growth, biodiversity, basic cell biology, genetics and evolution. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 150 BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to the central unifying concepts of biology including the biochemical foundations of life, cell structure and function, cell metabolism, genetics, and evolution. laboratories introduce students to the process and methods of science through investigative experiences. This course is designed for the science major. Prerequisites: A year of high school biology; and a year of high school chemistry or CHEM 101 or CHEM 111.

BIOL 151 DIVERSTY AND PATTERNS OF LIFE WITH LABORATORY

An overview of organismal diversity and ecology. Through a taxonomic survey, students are introduced to prokaryotic and eukaryotic diversity including microorganisms, plants, and animals. Organismic anatomy and physiology, as well as fundamentals of ecology, are also considered. laboratories introduce students to the process and methods of science through investigative experiences. This course is designed for the science major. Prerequisites: A year of high school biology and a year of high school chemistry or CHEM 111.

BIOL 200 ENVIRONMENTAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH

An appraisal of man's surroundings which influence his health, including an introduction to the societal structure designed to cope with health problems. Of particular benefit to those who plan to major in the social sciences or enter the field of public health.

BIOL 201 INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

A study of the basic aspects of microbiology for allied health students that includes an introduction to the identification, physiology, growth and control of microbes. Laboratory exercises will emphasize aseptic, pure culture, and identification techniques. This course can only be used to fulfill graduation requirement for students in the allied health biology emphasis.

BIOL 300 BASIC NUTRITION

An introduction to the science of human nutrition. Consideration is given to the chemical nature and functions of the major groups of nutrients, the function of the digestive system, energy metabolism and balance, weight control, and nutrition for fitness. Human nutrition during the life span is also addressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 130 or BIOL 150; and CHEM 101 or CHEM 111.

BIOL 301 GENERAL ECOLOGY

An introduction to basic ecological principles and their relationships to natural systems. Human impact on the natural systems is assessed. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and BIOL 151. Prerequisite or corequisite: COM 202.

BIOL 302 ECOLOGY LABORATORY AND RECITATION

An experimental approach in both field and Laboratory to explore fundamental ecological principles. Students gather and analyze data to address ecological hypotheses, learn practical ecological skills (performing field techniques, using statistical and graphical tools, and interpreting ecological software), and develop oral and written communication skills. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 151, and CHEM 113. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 301.

BIOL 310 CELL BIOLOGY

An introduction to cellular function and structure. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and BIOL 151. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 231 or CHEM 331; and COTH 202.

BIOL 312 GENETICS

A course in Mendelian inheritance, linkage, chromosomal aberrations, molecular genetics, gene regulation, genetic engineering, and population genetics. Prerequisites: BIOL 301, BIOL 310, CHEM 105, and CHEM 109; or CHEM 331.

BIOL 313 CELL GENETICS LABORATORY

An introduction to experimentation and Laboratory techniques used in cell biology, physiology, and genetics, including experimental design, data analysis, and presentation of research results. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 312.

BIOL 320 ORNITHOLOGY WITH LABORATORY AND RECITATION

An introduction to the study of bird evolution, ecology, and conservation. This course has a strong field component providing frequent opportunities to observe birds in their native environments. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission

BIOL 322 MAMMALOGY LABORATORY AND RECITATION

An introduction to the study of mammal taxonomy, evolution, ecology and conservation. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 327 FIELD ENTOMOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to the world of the most diverse and abundant form of animal life on Earth through an experiential, field, and Laboratory class. The course emphasizes field study, collection and preservation, identification, ecology, and natural history. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 342 MICROBIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to microbial morphology, identification, physiology, genetics, and microbiology Laboratory techniques. A brief consideration is given to fungi. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus

BIOL 352 BOTANY WITH LABORATORY

Using field and Laboratory experiences this course explores the diversity within the plant kingdom using a comparative approach to examine evolutionary trends and relationships. Students are introduced to the structure and function of plants through an investigation of plant cells, tissues, organs, and basic physiological processes. Economic importance, human uses, and significance of plants to society are emphasized. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 151, and ENG 102; or instructor permission.

BIOL 353 ROCKY MOUNTAIN FLORA

A field and Laboratory course focusing on identification of flowering plants common to the Western Slope of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. This course covers methods of plant collection and preservation, field identification, natural history, and ecology as well as local plants of particular human interest, including those that are medically important, edible, and poisonous. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and BIOL 151; or instructor permission.

BIOL 362 EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY-THEORY AND APPLICATION

This course provides a comprehensive overview of evolutionary processes and mechanisms within an applied framework. Evolutionary perspectives in human health and medicine, environmental and conservation biology, agriculture and natural resource management, and biotechnology are covered. Topics include organismic adaptation to changing environments and long-term responses to environmental perturbation, and insights into many issues of growing social importance such as climate change, land use change, and emerging diseases. Prerequisites: BIOL 312; or ENVS 350, ENVS 370, ENVS 390, and either BIOL 151 or both BIOL 130 and BIOL 135; or instructor permission.

BIOL 372 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to regulatory mechanisms which maintain normal body function. Specific topics include cytology, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. The course is designed for allied health and exercise and sport science students. Prerequisites: BIOL 150; CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

BIOL 373 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II WITH LABORATORY

A continuation of BIOL 372 Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Specific topics include immunology, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, excretory system, reproductive system, and endocrine system. Prerequisite: BIOL 372.

BIOL 392 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A study in a specific area of biology under the direction of a faculty member. May be taken for a maximum of four credits. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

BIOL 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics (1-6 credit hours, to be determined by faculty, department and student)

BIOL 398 BIOLOGY TEACHING PRACTICUM

Under faculty supervision, students participate in the development of Laboratory and field experience exercises, as well as in their instruction and execution. Specifically designed for students serving as teaching assistants in Biology. May be taken for a maximum of 3 credits. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: Biol 150, Biol 151, and instructor permission

BIOL 420 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY I WITH LABORATORY

A study of the molecular mechanisms by which cellular processes are controlled in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics include the biochemistry of macromolecular processes, the structure of genes and chromosomes, the genetic and molecular techniques used to study gene expression, and the transcriptional and translational control of gene expression. The Laboratory includes recombinant DNA techniques to manipulate the genome of a model organism. Prerequisites: BIOL 312 and CHEM 471.

BIOL 430 WILDLIFE ECOLOGY MANAGEMENT WITH LABORATORY

Principles of ecology are applied to population and habitat management towards wildlife conservation. Tools used by wildlife biologists to restore endangered species, harvest sustainable populations, reduce overpopulated species, and to monitor and study populations are emphasized. Habitat management approaches are discussed, along with human dimensions in wildlife conservation. A field component allows students to investigate wildlife populations and habitat issues in the Gunnison Basin. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 431 WILDLIFE TECHNIQUES WORKSHOP

A one week intensive field course focuses on wildlife conservation issues and wildlife management techniques such as trapping and marking wildlife, radio telemetry, population monitoring, GPS and GIS, and wildlife conflict resolution. The course includes a trip outside the basin; a field trip course fee is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission. Co-requisite: BIOL 430

BIOL 435 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

An introduction to the study of animal behavior. This course emphasizes the importance of ecology and evolution in understanding animal behavior. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus or instructor permission.

BIOL 440 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

This course addresses the reduction in biological diversity of the planet and suggested solutions to prevent further reduction. Integrating themes are drawn from scientific disciplines such as population genetics, ecology, evolutionary biology, botany, zoology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and wildlife management. Prerequisites: BIOL 312; or ENVS 350, ENVS 370, ENVS 390, and either BIOL 151 or both BIOL 130 and BIOL 135; or instructor permission.

BIOL 444 COLORADO ECOREGIONS

A survey of the three main ecoregions of Colorado including the Great Plains, the Southern Rocky Mountains, and the Colorado Plateau. Students travel throughout Colorado and explore the ecology and natural history of the ecosystems by hiking, backpacking, and river rafting. Content includes an evolutionary perspective on ecosystem features and the adaptations of species characterizing each system, as well as applied issues in natural resources management. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 454 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An examination of the embryology of vertebrates, stressing mammalian embryonic development and comparisons with amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Prerequisites: Biology 312.

BIOL 474 COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An analysis of function in invertebrates and vertebrates, utilizing an environmental approach and emphasizing evolutionary trends in physiological systems. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus and PHYS 140.

BIOL 476 AQUATIC ECOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

A study of physical, chemical, and biological parameters of lakes and streams in the functioning of freshwater eco-systems. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus and SCI 202; or instructor permission.

BIOL 477 PLANT ECOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to plant populations and communities, including their role within terrestrial ecosystems. Prerequisites: Biol 301; or instructor permission

BIOL 481 FOREST ECOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

Ecology of forest species, communities, landscapes, and ecosystems, with a focus on the Gunnison Basin. Topics include tree physiology, species interactions, fire and disturbance, succession, forest types, climate, forest management and restoration. Laboratories and field trips will provide hands-on experience and practical skills in tree identification, forest mensuration, vegetation sampling, statistics and GIS. Students will develop and conduct independent/group research projects. Prerequisites: BIOL 301, MATH 213

BIOL 495 SENIOR SEMINAR

An examination of biological sub disciplines through an investigation of the primary literature. The professional practices, procedures, and standards of the sub discipline are discussed. This course may be repeated for credit and must be taken twice to fulfill the Capstone Course requirement. Graded Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory only. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus and MATH 213.

BIOL 496 SENIOR THESIS

An application of the research-based practices for instruction in math. Focus is placed on the foundations for assessing and teaching math by addressing basic skills, critical thinking skills, conceptual understanding, real life applications, and diverse learner needs. Students implement and review specific assessment practices, teaching structures, intervention strategies, and technology applications within a standards- based framework of instruction. Prerequisite: admission to the Education Department.

BIOL 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

thinking skills, conceptual understanding, real life applications, and diverse learner