Courses

ACC 201 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

An introduction to the field of accounting with emphasis on corporate financial statements. Financial statements are viewed as a communication device conveying the financial health of a business to interested parties. The objective of this first course is to teach students to read, analyze, and interpret these financial statements. The emphasis is on developing critical thinking and problem-solving skills using accounting concepts. Students are exposed to the steps used by accountants to record, measure, and process financial information. Cash flow analysis is contrasted with the accrual basis of accounting; the concepts of asset valuation and income measurement are discussed. Accounting majors must pass this class with a minimum grade of "C." Prerequisites: completion of the College Mathematics Course Requirement with minimum grade of "C-", or instructor permission.

ACC 202 INTRODUCTIONTO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

An introduction to the preparation, uses, and analysis of common management accounting information. Topics include cost-volume-profit analysis, capital budgeting and present value applications, cash budgets, financial statement analysis, taxes, and management decisions, plus a brief introduction to modern cost accounting, with emphasis on activity-based costing systems. The development of problem-solving and analytical abilities is given primary importance throughout the course. Accounting majors must pass this class with a minimum grade of "C". Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of C; and ACC 201 with a minimum grade of C.

ACC 301 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I

Rigorous and comprehensive study of the means by which generally accepted accounting principles are used to generate the publicly-available information disseminated by modern U.S. corporations. Theoretical and practical criticisms and alternatives to current accounting practice are also considered, as is the idea of accounting as an information feedback system that allows individuals and organizations to reshape their environment. In addition, students are exposed to the realities of the economic and political climate surrounding the accounting standard-setting process. Accounting majors must pass this class with a minimum grade of "C."Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C"; and ACC 201 with a minimum grade of "C."

ACC 302 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II

Continuation of ACC 301. As the ACC 301-02 sequence progresses, increased emphasis is placed on the relationship of modern accounting and information theory to current accounting practice. In addition, students are expected to develop an insight into the behavioral and economic consequences of the financial reporting process. Accounting majors must pass this class with a minimum grade of "C." Prerequisite: ACC 301.

ACC 320 ADVANCED MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

A study of the information needed by managers for planning, control and decision-making. Both the tools needed to generate this information and the principles involved in evaluating the information are covered. Topics include: breakeven analysis; product and process costing, including activity-based costing, standard costing and joint costs; cash budgets and forecasting; relevant costs and nonroutine decisions; the direct vs. absorption costing tradeoff; and capital budgeting. The overall level of difficulty in this course is generally consistent with the level of difficulty encountered on typical management accounting problems found on the Uniform CPA Examination. Accounting majors must pass this class with a minimum grade of "C." Prerequisites: ACC 202 and ACC 301.

ACC 340 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

A dual-purpose course which explores the theoretical view of information systems, while at the same time exposing the student to actual off-the-shelf accounting software. The course alternates between textbook readings and discussions and several case studies which require the student to create a computerized accounting system for a fictional client. After completing the course, the student is expected to possess the ability to computerize a manual accounting system, to understand system theory underpinnings of accounting information systems, and to have developed a view of the implications of expected technological advances on management information systems in general and accounting systems in particular. Prerequisite: BUAD 220 or CIS 120. Prerequisite or corequisite:ACC 301.

ACC 350 INCOME TAX

An introduction to the federal income tax system. Emphasis is on the ways in which the U.S. income tax laws influence personal and business behavior and decision making, and how the tax laws can be used to accomplish various economic and social objectives. Topics covered include an introduction to tax research, principles of income and deduction, tax liability, and tax credits. Individual taxation is the primary focus, but the basic principles apply to most forms of business organization as well. Accounting majors must pass this class with a minimum grade of "C." Prerequisite: minimum sophomore standing.

ACC 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

needs. Students implement and review specific assessment practices, teaching

ACC 410 AUDITING

An introduction to the field of auditing including an examination of the standards and methods used by certified professional accountants when attesting to the fairness of corporate financial statements. Specific topics include the accounting professional code of ethics, generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS), internal controls, sampling techniques, audit planning and specific audit procedures. Government policies concerning auditors' responsibilities for fraud detection are also discussed. Prerequisite: ACC 302.

ACC 450 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

An overview of the financial accounting theory, practice, problems, and reporting requirements for various economic entities. These include partnerships, foreign branches and subsidiaries, state and local governments, colleges and universities, hospitals, voluntary organizations, and the modern parent/subsidiary corporate structure. The approach taken in this course is that there are common information needs which each of these entities must satisfy. While the specific approach used to satisfy this need is dependent on a variety of factors, the common thread is that useful information is being generated for the consumers of that information. Prerequisite: ACC 302.

ACC 460 ADVANCED INCOME TAX

A continuation of federal income taxation, with emphasis on property transactions, corporations, partnerships, and fiduciaries. A primary objective is decision-making from an after-tax point of view, that is, how taxes affect behavior. Topics include the tax effects of organizing, operating, and liquidating partnerships and corporations. Tax research methodology and the federal estate and gift tax are also covered. Prerequisite: ACC 350.

ACC 491 SEMINAR IN ACCOUNTING

A boardroom approach to problem solving through research, discussion, and analysis.

ACC 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A singular investigation into a unique problem arrived at between the researcher and the advisor.

ACC 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

structures, intervention strategies, and technology applications within a standards based

ACC 498 ACCOUNTING ETHICS

Investigates and explores the ethical responsibilities faced by professional accountants in all fields. Students will read, discuss, and analyze case studies regarding ethical situations and issues confronted by the accounting profession. The AICPA Code of Professional Conduct will be studied, as well as foundational ethical theory and an approach for identifying and analyzing ethical issues, with a focus on current events. Students are expected to make significant written and oral contributions to the class. This is the capstone course for the Standard Accounting Major and the Professional Emphasis. Prerequisite: senior status.

ACC 499 INTERNSHIP IN ACCOUNTING

Experiences designed especially for the uninitiated student. Internships provide guided, counseled, and progressive experience under a dual tutelage program of a businessperson and an academician. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

ANTH 107 INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY

A general introduction to anthropology. All three sub-fields of modern anthropology: cultural anthropology (archaeology and ethnography), physical anthropology, and linguistics are covered.

ANTH 218 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An examination of biological variation in modern human populations and biological evolution of humans as shown by the fossil record. Prerequisite: ANTH 107.

ANTH 219 ARCHAEOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

A study of the methods and theory of modern archaeology. The emphasis is on how archaeologists understand the past. A general chronology of world prehistory is presented. Prerequisite: ANTH 107.

ANTH 230 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

An exploration of ethnographic theory and methods, and a cross-cultural and comparative examination of societies studied by ethnographers. Prerequisite: ANTH 107.

ANTH 265 ANTHROPOLOGICAL WRITING AND STATISTICS

An introduction to the skills employed in the field of anthropology, using data sets and techniques from anthropological research. Prerequisites: ANTH 107, ENG 102, and MATH 140.

ANTH 319 PALEOLITHIC ARCHAEOLOGY

An in-depth study of the early development of culture-bearing humans. The evolution of Paleolithic lifeways are traced, from early pebble tool cultures, through the peopling of the Old World by Homo erectus, to the coexistence of Neanderthals and Cro-Magnon in Europe, and finally to the advent of specialized hunters during the Upper Paleolithic. The course covers Paleolithic culture history as well as methods. Artifact analysis is included. Prerequisite: ANTH 218 or ANTH 219.

ANTH 320 CULTURAL ECOLOGY

An examination of key perspectives, theories, and methods in the study of ecological anthropology. Students learn about the use and definition of the environment by groups from different cultural backgrounds, and build a comparative perspective in so doing. The focus is on contemporary groups, but archaeological examples are used as comparison and to build time-depth in our understanding of cultural ecology. Prerequisite: ANTH 107 or instructor permission.

ANTH 322 ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL CULTURE

A LABORATORY course training students in analytical methods in anthropology. Students are responsible for a major project in which they carry out all phases of anthropological research, including research design, background research, hypothesis, analysis, and presentation of results. Materials studied include lithics, fauna, ceramics, and botanical remains. An excellent preparation for (or follow-up to) the Archaeological Field School. Prerequisite: ANTH 219.

ANTH 333 ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLORADO

A detailed look at the archaeological sequences of Colorado with an emphasis on western Colorado. Time periods from Paleo-Indian to Historic are described. This course is a recommended preparatory course for the Archaeological Field School in Colorado or the Archaeological Field Trip. Prerequisite: ANTH 219.

ANTH 344 INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA

A detailed look at the native people found in North America and their relationships to each other and the non-native settlers of North America. Several case studies are examined in depth. Prerequisite: ANTH 107 or instructor permission.

ANTH 355 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

An examination of medical systems from various cultural groups, focusing on beliefs, methods of healing, health practitioners, and medical pluralism. Prerequisite: ANTH 107.

ANTH 369 ANTHROPOLOGY FIELD TRIP

A field study of archaeological and ethnographic cultures in the western United States. Students camp and tour ancient sites, modern Native American towns, and anthropological museums. This course may be taken for a maximum of six credits.

ANTH 392 INDEPENDENT STUDY

framework of instruction. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

ANTH 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics (1-6 credit hours, to be determined by faculty, department and student)

ANTH 465 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY

A study of the history and intellectual growth of anthropology is paired with individual work on student projects, which employ theory and methods discussed in class. Students present their work to the college community. Prerequisite: ANTH 265 and senior standing; or instructor permission.

ANTH 467 ETHNOGRAPHY FIELD SCHOOL

A field experience in cultural anthropology in which students are immersed in the culture, traditions, and lifeways of a group of people, learning methods of inquiry and anthropological perspectives through hands-on experiences. This course may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or instructor permission.

ANTH 469 ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL

A field-experience course in which students learn and perform proper field techniques. Some Laboratory work may be involved. This course is offered during the summer session and may be taken for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: ANTH 219 or instructor permission.

ANTH 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics (1-6 credit hours, to be determined by faculty, department and student)

ART 0 EXHIBITION CONVOCATION ATTENDANCE

Designed to encourage exhibition and convocation attendance as a means of learning about art history, professional artists, artistic practice, portfolio review, and topics of interest to artists. Students qualify for a "satisfactory" grade by attending all of the posted events in each semester. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

ART 105 INTRODUCTION TO ART

An introduction to the visual arts with an emphasis on the influence of art works on present-day living and thinking. A specific focus is announced each time the course is offered. Some examples include architecture, Native American art, non-western art, women in art, crafts, and European art. (Course may be taken only once for credit and does not count toward the Art major or minor.)

ART 119 FOUNDATION DRAWING I

A foundation course in drawing with special attention to line, value, perspective, texture, and shape. Landscape, still life, and other forms are used as subject matter. The visual elements and principles of organization in relationship to perceiving both flat and illusionary space are explored. Black and white media are exclusively practiced. Prerequisite: Art major or minor status.

ART 120 FOUNDATIONS DRAWING II

A foundation course in drawing, placing emphasis on composition. The study of the essential aspects of drawing (such as gesture, contour, proportions, anatomy, structure, textural surface, and articulation) and their synthesis into a coherent drawing attitude. Included in this course is the introduction of drawing the life form and color. Prerequisite: ART 119.

ART 171 FOUNDATION DESIGN: 2-DIMENSIONAL

An introduction to design organization with an emphasis on the exploration of line, value, texture, shape, and color. Prerequisite: Art major or minor status.

ART 172 FOUNDATION DESIGN: 3-DIMENSIONAL

A foundation course in design organization with emphasis on the exploration of mass, texture, process, and techniques in the three-dimensional area. Tools and materials are explored. Prerequisite: Art major or minor status.

ART 203 INTRODUCTION TO CERAMICS

An introduction to the basic techniques and processes of ceramics: pinch, coil, slab, and some wheelwork. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 222 ART HISTORY I

A survey of western and non-western art from approximately 30,000 years ago to the 14th century. Works of art and architecture are examined within the cultural and historic context for art-making through world human history. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C" and Art major or minor status.

ART 223 ART HISTORY II

A survey of western and non-western art from approximately the 14th century to the present. Works of art and architecture are examined within the cultural and historic context for art-making through world human history. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C" and Art major or minor status.

ART 230 INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE

An introduction to the various processes of sculpture: carving, modeling, and casting. Aesthetic qualities and craftsmanship of the sculptural forms are emphasized. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 235 INTRODUCTION TO JEWELRY

An introduction to the creative use of silver and precious gemstones in the making of jewelry. Design and craftsmanship are emphasized. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 246 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY

An introduction to contemporary photographic technique incorporating traditional black-and-white analogue photography alongside digital photographic practice and procedure. Lectures introduce topic areas that the student must exercise in LABORATORY sessions. Students must supply their own "quality" 35mm or 120mm camera. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 257 INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING

An introduction to the basic techniques of printmaking including lithography, woodcut, etching, and the collagraph. Emphasis is on the traditional approaches in printmaking. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 270 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN ILLUSTRATION

An introductory course utilizing the basic fundamentals of art in a broad base of commercial applications. Design in the areas of corporate identity, packaging, illustration, and typography are explored. Illustration, new techniques, materials, and tools used by the designer are emphasized. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 271 CALLIGRAPHY TYPOGRAPHY

A study of individual letter forms as design elements that relate to visual communication. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 280 INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING

An introduction to oil painting, using basic tools, materials, techniques, and the development of compositional methods. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 283 INTRODUCTION TO AIRBRUSH

Introduction to the use of the airbrush as a tool for painting, drawing, and design. Multiple use of the tool within traditional and non-traditional directions, as well as tool maintenance, are stressed. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172

ART 286 INTRODUCTION TO WATERCOLOR

An introduction to both the traditional and contemporary methods of watercolor. The various watercolor media are explored. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 171, and ART 172.

ART 303 INTERMEDIATE CERAMICS

An exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual ceramic direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 203.

ART 319 INTERMEDIATE DRAWING

A study of figure drawing with an emphasis on structure, figure compositions, and portrait studies from the model using various drawing media and techniques. Prerequisite: ART 120.

ART 321 AMERICAN ART: COLONIAL-MODERN

A survey of the arts of America from the 17th century to the present. Emphasis is placed on uniquely American innovations and expressions, regional distinctions in American art, with a strong component in art of the American West; significant individual artists and trends; and the arts of the many diverse peoples that comprise America. Prerequisite: junior standing or instructor permission.

ART 324 ART CRITICISM AND CRITICAL THEORY IN CONTEMPORARY ART

A survey of contemporary art and art practices through the discipline of art criticism. This seminar course prepares students for senior-level courses and advanced studies in art and art history at the graduate level. A survey of modern and contemporary art since the midtwentieth century is followed by seminar presentations on selected readings. Prerequisites: ART 222 and ART 223.

ART 325 WOMEN ARTISTS

A survey of women artists and their work from the 16th century (Renaissance) to contemporary times. The contributions of women artists and the changing roles of women in the western tradition of the visual arts are examined within relevant historical, political, social, theoretical, and gender contexts. Prerequisite: junior standing or instructor permission.

ART 330 INTERMEDIATE SCULPTURE

An exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual sculpture direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 230.

ART 335 INTERMEDIATE JEWELRY

Designed for exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual jewelry direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 235.

ART 346 INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY

An intermediate course that explores the expressive possibilities of individual photography direction with an emphasis placed on digital photographic practices and principles. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 246.

ART 357 INTERMEDIATE PRINTMAKING

An exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual printmaking direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 257.

ART 370 INTERMEDIATE GRAPHIC DESIGN

A study of graphic design processes and applications. Emphasis is on the exploration of creative solutions to design problems. Topics include past and current design trends, tools, and computer related graphics. Prerequisite: ART 270.

ART 375 INTERMEDIATE MAGAZINE PRODUCTION

An integration of journalism and art course work into a study of magazine production. Faculty supervise students in design and production work leading to the publication of the Western Pathfinder Magazine, in both print and online versions. Prerequisite: ART370 and instructor permission.

ART 380 INTERMEDIATE PAINTING

An exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual painting direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 280.

ART 386 INTERMEDIATE WATERCOLOR

Designed for exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual watercolor direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 286.

ART 390 WORKSHOP IN ART

A review and critique of advanced problems in art: two-dimensional, three-dimensional, or design. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits (three per semester). Prerequisites: junior or senior status and instructor permission. Students must have completed 300-level course in their chosen emphasis.

ART 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics (1-6 credit hours, to be determined by faculty, department and student)

ART 400 ARTIST PORTFOLIO SENIOR EXHIBITION

A Capstone Course in which students develop a portfolio of recent work which enhances preparation for the Senior Exhibition, a career in art, gallery representation, or application to graduate school. Prerequisite: senior standing.

ART 403 ADVANCED CERAMICS I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual ceramic direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 303.

ART 404 ADVANCED CERAMICS II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual ceramic direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 403.

ART 405 ADVANCED CERAMICS III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual ceramic direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 403.

ART 419 ADVANCED DRAWING

An advanced study in figure drawing with emphasis on the figure, expanding visual awareness by developing control of drawing as a tool for research and invention. Problems progress from simple structural analysis to more sophisticated exploration of subject matter, and finally to individual interpretation. Prerequisite: ART 319 and B.F.A. candidate.

ART 421 ART MESOAMERICA AND ANDEAN REGION OF SOUTH AMERICA

A survey of the arts of the Pre-contact civilizations in Middle America and the Andes. The art and architecture of these ancestral peoples are examined within their cultural contexts. Prerequisite: junior standing or instructor permission.

ART 422 NATIVE AMERICAN ART OF NORTH AMERICA

A survey of the arts of the indigenous (First Nations) civilizations of North America, from antiquity to the present era. The art and architecture of these peoples and artists are examined contextually. Prerequisite: minimum junior standing or instructor permission.

ART 424 MODERN ART HISTORY, AESTHETICS, THEORY, AND CRITICISM

An exploration of trends and developments in the Western tradition of the visual arts from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, considering Modernism, Post-Modernism, and recent tendencies. The visual arts of these periods are viewed through the lens of theories and ideas that have powered change in Western art, including current revisionist and theoretical considerations in Art and Art History. Prerequisite: minimum junior standing or instructor permission.

ART 430 ADVANCED SCULPTURE I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual sculptural direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 330.

ART 431 ADVANCED SCULPTURE II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual sculptural direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 430.

ART 432 ADVANCED SCULPTURE III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual sculptural direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 431.

ART 435 ADVANCED JEWELRY I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual jewelry direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 335.

ART 436 ADVANCED JEWELRY II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual jewelry direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 435.

ART 437 ADVANCED JEWELRY III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual jewelry direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 436.

ART 446 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual photography direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 346.

ART 447 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual photography direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 446.

ART 448 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual photography direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 447.

ART 457 ADVANCED PRINTMAKING I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual printmaking direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 357.

ART 458 ADVANCED PRINTMAKING II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual printmaking direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 457.

ART 459 ADVANCED PRINTMAKING III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual printmaking direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 458.

ART 470 ADVANCED DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual graphic design direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 370.

ART 471 ADVANCED DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual graphic design direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 470.

ART 472 ADVANCED DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual graphic design direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction of study. Prerequisite: ART 471.

ART 475 ADVANCED MAGAZINE PRODUCTION I

An advanced integration of journalism and art course work into a study of magazine production. Faculty supervise students in design and production work leading to the publication of the Western Pathfinder Magazine, in both print and online versions. Prerequisite: ART 375 and instructor permission.

ART 476 ADVANCED MAGAZINE PRODUCTION II

An advanced integration of journalism and art course work into a study of magazine production. Faculty supervise students in design and production work leading to the publication of the Western Pathfinder Magazine, in both print and online versions. Prerequisite: ART 475 and instructor permission.

ART 477 ADVANCED MAGAZINE PRODUCTION III

An advanced integration of journalism and art course work into a study of magazine production. Faculty supervise students in design and production work leading to the publication of the Western Pathfinder Magazine, in both print and online versions. Prerequisite: ART 476 and instructor permission.

ART 480 ADVANCED PAINTING I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual painting direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisites: ART 380.

ART 481 ADVANCED PAINTING II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual painting direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 480.

ART 482 ADVANCED PAINTING III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual painting direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 481.

ART 486 ADVANCED WATERCOLOR I

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual watercolor direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisites: ART 386.

ART 487 ADVANCED WATERCOLOR II

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual watercolor direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 486.

ART 488 ADVANCED WATERCOLOR III

An advanced exploration of the expressive possibilities of individual watercolor direction. Students collaborate with the instructor to plan a suitable and particular direction for study. Prerequisite: ART 487.

ART 490 WORKSHOP IN ART

A review and critique of advanced problems in art: two-dimensional, three-dimensional, or design. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits (three credits per semester). Prerequisites: senior standing and instructor permission. Students must have completed a 400-level course in chosen emphasis.

ART 491 SEMINAR IN ART

An investigation and evaluation of contemporary topics in art. Students are exposed to artistic expression through visiting artist programs, exhibitions, and workshops. Students develop individual research topics. Prerequisites: B.F.A. candidate and senior standing.

ART 492 DIRECTED STUDY

Individualized instruction for advanced students who have taken all the courses in a particular art area and wish to pursue the area further. Prerequisite: junior or senior status with at least 15 credits in Art.

ART 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics (1-6 credit hours, to be determined by faculty, department and student)

ART 499 INTERNSHIP

Supervised practical experiences in art for advanced students. With faculty approval, credit earned in this course may be applied to the Major or Minor in Art. Prerequisite: instructor permission.

BIOL 120 STUDIES IN BIOLOGY

An introduction to selected biological topics and the methods of science through an exploration of current topics such as evolution, bioethics and conservation biology. Students may only take this course once for credit.

BIOL 130 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY

An introduction to basic biological principles as they apply to interactions between organisms and their environment. Consideration is given to biotic and abiotic interactions, energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, population growth, biodiversity, basic cell biology, genetics, and evolution with a special emphasis on human impacts on these biological systems. This course establishes a strong foundation in applied biology from a scientific perspective.

BIOL 135 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY

An experimental approach in both the field and Laboratory to explore fundamental biological principles including biotic and abiotic interactions, energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, population growth, biodiversity, basic cell biology, genetics and evolution. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 130.

BIOL 150 BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to the central unifying concepts of biology including the biochemical foundations of life, cell structure and function, cell metabolism, genetics, and evolution. laboratories introduce students to the process and methods of science through investigative experiences. This course is designed for the science major. Prerequisites: A year of high school biology; and a year of high school chemistry or CHEM 101 or CHEM 111.

BIOL 151 DIVERSTY AND PATTERNS OF LIFE WITH LABORATORY

An overview of organismal diversity and ecology. Through a taxonomic survey, students are introduced to prokaryotic and eukaryotic diversity including microorganisms, plants, and animals. Organismic anatomy and physiology, as well as fundamentals of ecology, are also considered. laboratories introduce students to the process and methods of science through investigative experiences. This course is designed for the science major. Prerequisites: A year of high school biology and a year of high school chemistry or CHEM 111.

BIOL 200 ENVIRONMENTAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH

An appraisal of man's surroundings which influence his health, including an introduction to the societal structure designed to cope with health problems. Of particular benefit to those who plan to major in the social sciences or enter the field of public health.

BIOL 201 INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

A study of the basic aspects of microbiology for allied health students that includes an introduction to the identification, physiology, growth and control of microbes. Laboratory exercises will emphasize aseptic, pure culture, and identification techniques. This course can only be used to fulfill graduation requirement for students in the allied health biology emphasis.

BIOL 300 BASIC NUTRITION

An introduction to the science of human nutrition. Consideration is given to the chemical nature and functions of the major groups of nutrients, the function of the digestive system, energy metabolism and balance, weight control, and nutrition for fitness. Human nutrition during the life span is also addressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 130 or BIOL 150; and CHEM 101 or CHEM 111.

BIOL 301 GENERAL ECOLOGY

An introduction to basic ecological principles and their relationships to natural systems. Human impact on the natural systems is assessed. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and BIOL 151. Prerequisite or corequisite: COM 202.

BIOL 302 ECOLOGY LABORATORY AND RECITATION

An experimental approach in both field and Laboratory to explore fundamental ecological principles. Students gather and analyze data to address ecological hypotheses, learn practical ecological skills (performing field techniques, using statistical and graphical tools, and interpreting ecological software), and develop oral and written communication skills. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 151, and CHEM 113. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 301.

BIOL 310 CELL BIOLOGY

An introduction to cellular function and structure. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and BIOL 151. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 231 or CHEM 331; and COTH 202.

BIOL 312 GENETICS

A course in Mendelian inheritance, linkage, chromosomal aberrations, molecular genetics, gene regulation, genetic engineering, and population genetics. Prerequisites: BIOL 301, BIOL 310, CHEM 105, and CHEM 109; or CHEM 331.

BIOL 313 CELL GENETICS LABORATORY

An introduction to experimentation and Laboratory techniques used in cell biology, physiology, and genetics, including experimental design, data analysis, and presentation of research results. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 312.

BIOL 320 ORNITHOLOGY WITH LABORATORY AND RECITATION

An introduction to the study of bird evolution, ecology, and conservation. This course has a strong field component providing frequent opportunities to observe birds in their native environments. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission

BIOL 322 MAMMALOGY LABORATORY AND RECITATION

An introduction to the study of mammal taxonomy, evolution, ecology and conservation. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 327 FIELD ENTOMOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to the world of the most diverse and abundant form of animal life on Earth through an experiential, field, and Laboratory class. The course emphasizes field study, collection and preservation, identification, ecology, and natural history. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 342 MICROBIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to microbial morphology, identification, physiology, genetics, and microbiology Laboratory techniques. A brief consideration is given to fungi. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus

BIOL 352 BOTANY WITH LABORATORY

Using field and Laboratory experiences this course explores the diversity within the plant kingdom using a comparative approach to examine evolutionary trends and relationships. Students are introduced to the structure and function of plants through an investigation of plant cells, tissues, organs, and basic physiological processes. Economic importance, human uses, and significance of plants to society are emphasized. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 151, and ENG 102; or instructor permission.

BIOL 353 ROCKY MOUNTAIN FLORA

A field and Laboratory course focusing on identification of flowering plants common to the Western Slope of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. This course covers methods of plant collection and preservation, field identification, natural history, and ecology as well as local plants of particular human interest, including those that are medically important, edible, and poisonous. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and BIOL 151; or instructor permission.

BIOL 362 EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY-THEORY AND APPLICATION

This course provides a comprehensive overview of evolutionary processes and mechanisms within an applied framework. Evolutionary perspectives in human health and medicine, environmental and conservation biology, agriculture and natural resource management, and biotechnology are covered. Topics include organismic adaptation to changing environments and long-term responses to environmental perturbation, and insights into many issues of growing social importance such as climate change, land use change, and emerging diseases. Prerequisites: BIOL 312; or ENVS 350, ENVS 370, ENVS 390, and either BIOL 151 or both BIOL 130 and BIOL 135; or instructor permission.

BIOL 372 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to regulatory mechanisms which maintain normal body function. Specific topics include cytology, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. The course is designed for allied health and exercise and sport science students. Prerequisites: BIOL 150; CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

BIOL 373 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II WITH LABORATORY

A continuation of BIOL 372 Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Specific topics include immunology, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, excretory system, reproductive system, and endocrine system. Prerequisite: BIOL 372.

BIOL 392 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A study in a specific area of biology under the direction of a faculty member. May be taken for a maximum of four credits. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

BIOL 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics (1-6 credit hours, to be determined by faculty, department and student)

BIOL 398 BIOLOGY TEACHING PRACTICUM

Under faculty supervision, students participate in the development of Laboratory and field experience exercises, as well as in their instruction and execution. Specifically designed for students serving as teaching assistants in Biology. May be taken for a maximum of 3 credits. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: Biol 150, Biol 151, and instructor permission

BIOL 420 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY I WITH LABORATORY

A study of the molecular mechanisms by which cellular processes are controlled in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics include the biochemistry of macromolecular processes, the structure of genes and chromosomes, the genetic and molecular techniques used to study gene expression, and the transcriptional and translational control of gene expression. The Laboratory includes recombinant DNA techniques to manipulate the genome of a model organism. Prerequisites: BIOL 312 and CHEM 471.

BIOL 430 WILDLIFE ECOLOGY MANAGEMENT WITH LABORATORY

Principles of ecology are applied to population and habitat management towards wildlife conservation. Tools used by wildlife biologists to restore endangered species, harvest sustainable populations, reduce overpopulated species, and to monitor and study populations are emphasized. Habitat management approaches are discussed, along with human dimensions in wildlife conservation. A field component allows students to investigate wildlife populations and habitat issues in the Gunnison Basin. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 431 WILDLIFE TECHNIQUES WORKSHOP

A one week intensive field course focuses on wildlife conservation issues and wildlife management techniques such as trapping and marking wildlife, radio telemetry, population monitoring, GPS and GIS, and wildlife conflict resolution. The course includes a trip outside the basin; a field trip course fee is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission. Co-requisite: BIOL 430

BIOL 435 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

An introduction to the study of animal behavior. This course emphasizes the importance of ecology and evolution in understanding animal behavior. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus or instructor permission.

BIOL 440 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

This course addresses the reduction in biological diversity of the planet and suggested solutions to prevent further reduction. Integrating themes are drawn from scientific disciplines such as population genetics, ecology, evolutionary biology, botany, zoology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and wildlife management. Prerequisites: BIOL 312; or ENVS 350, ENVS 370, ENVS 390, and either BIOL 151 or both BIOL 130 and BIOL 135; or instructor permission.

BIOL 444 COLORADO ECOREGIONS

A survey of the three main ecoregions of Colorado including the Great Plains, the Southern Rocky Mountains, and the Colorado Plateau. Students travel throughout Colorado and explore the ecology and natural history of the ecosystems by hiking, backpacking, and river rafting. Content includes an evolutionary perspective on ecosystem features and the adaptations of species characterizing each system, as well as applied issues in natural resources management. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or instructor permission.

BIOL 454 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An examination of the embryology of vertebrates, stressing mammalian embryonic development and comparisons with amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Prerequisites: Biology 312.

BIOL 474 COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An analysis of function in invertebrates and vertebrates, utilizing an environmental approach and emphasizing evolutionary trends in physiological systems. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus and PHYS 140.

BIOL 476 AQUATIC ECOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

A study of physical, chemical, and biological parameters of lakes and streams in the functioning of freshwater eco-systems. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus and SCI 202; or instructor permission.

BIOL 477 PLANT ECOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to plant populations and communities, including their role within terrestrial ecosystems. Prerequisites: Biol 301; or instructor permission

BIOL 481 FOREST ECOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

Ecology of forest species, communities, landscapes, and ecosystems, with a focus on the Gunnison Basin. Topics include tree physiology, species interactions, fire and disturbance, succession, forest types, climate, forest management and restoration. LABORATORYs and field trips will provide hands-on experience and practical skills in tree identification, forest mensuration, vegetation sampling, statistics and GIS. Students will develop and conduct independent/group research projects. Prerequisites: BIOL 301, MATH 213

BIOL 495 SENIOR SEMINAR

An examination of biological sub disciplines through an investigation of the primary literature. The professional practices, procedures, and standards of the sub discipline are discussed. This course may be repeated for credit and must be taken twice to fulfill the Capstone Course requirement. Graded Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory only. Prerequisites: Biology Nucleus and MATH 213.

BIOL 496 SENIOR THESIS

An application of the research-based practices for instruction in math. Focus is placed on the foundations for assessing and teaching math by addressing basic skills, critical thinking skills, conceptual understanding, real life applications, and diverse learner needs. Students implement and review specific assessment practices, teaching structures, intervention strategies, and technology applications within a standards- based framework of instruction. Prerequisite: admission to the Education Department.

BIOL 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

thinking skills, conceptual understanding, real life applications, and diverse learner

BUAD 100 BUSINESS IN SOCIETY

A study of the role of business in modern society. Topics include the private enterprise system, consumerism, management functions, major functional areas of large business, vital areas of small-business operation, and the environment of business.

BUAD 101 BUSINESS OF LIFE

This course helps students begin building the foundations of four critical life skills: economic decision making, managing personal finances, personal branding and creating change. Students learn the basics of objective decision making, managing budgets and filing income taxes, creating and projecting a personal image, and using creativity and innovation within organizations and personal lives.

BUAD 150 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY

An introduction to hospitality management, including historical developmental patterns, current business trends, and future international expectations. Current job market, working environments, personal risks, and rewards are explored.

BUAD 206 PERSONAL FINANCE

Designed to help students plan the handling of their finances in everyday business transactions. Topics include budgeting, credit, savings, insurance, income tax, investments, and estate planning.

BUAD 210 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

Provides students an ability to sense the occasions when a lawyer should be consulted for guidance in avoiding legal mistakes. A study is made of the ordinary legal aspects of common business transactions, including the topics of social forces, contracts, personal property, and agency.

BUAD 220 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN BUSINESS

Designed to teach students to apply a variety of interdisciplinary computer applications in their business professions. Topics include integrating word processing, spreadsheets, databases, communications, and graphics on personal computers. A minimal skill in keyboarding is required.

BUAD 270 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of marketing, including consumer demand and behavior, segmentation, advertising, marketing research, product development, distribution, pricing, the internet as a marketing agent, and global marketing issues. The student is exposed to the most basic tools, factors, and marketing principles administered by management in establishing policy, planning, and complex problem solving. Prerequisites: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-" and completion of at least 24 credits; or instructor permission.

BUAD 300 BUSINESS ETHICS

A study of how ethics apply to business organizations today. Special emphasis is placed on developing moral reasoning. The course provides multiple perspectives on actual cases and ethical dilemmas faced by organizations with an emphasis on allowing students to think through ethical problems. Topics studied include moral philosophies, moral agency and development, ethical underpinnings of free markets and economic systems, and ethical concerns with the environment, future generations, and other stakeholders such as employees and consumers. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 309 or COTH 202; or instructor permission.

BUAD 301 TOPICS BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Provides an opportunity for students to examine current issues, topics, problems, and trends within the field.

BUAD 305 FUNDAMENTALS OF PROFESSION LAND AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Introduction to the energy industry, including petroleum, minerals, wind, solar, and alternative fuels. Includes the history of the energy industry and provides basics in exploration, production, transportation and refining. Electricity generation and transmission is explored and global energy concepts are discussed. Prerequisite: admission into the PLRM program or instructor permission.

BUAD 309 BUSINESS COMMUNICATION

A study of the fundamentals, principles, and practices of effective written communication, including concepts of appearance, language, and psychology of tone and persuasiveness as applied to the business letter, memorandum, and report. Presentation skills are also discussed. Prerequisites: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-"; sophomore standing.

BUAD 311 ESSENTIAL SKILLS FOR THE WORKPLACE

This course prepares the student for Microsoft Excel Office Specialist certification. This course covers all of the topics tested by the certifying examination including managing worksheets and workbooks, applying formulas and functions, analyzing and organizing data, visual presentation of data, and sharing worksheet data with others. Prerequisites: college-level mathematics requirement with a minimum grade of "C-" or instructor permission

BUAD 312 ADVANCED EXCEL APPLICATIONS

This course emphasizes the use of computer spreadsheets to organize, analyze and present quantitative information to aid managerial decision-making. The course exercises include examples from several disciplines including business, energy and environmental impact analysis, natural sciences, and social sciences. Specific topics will include business planning and budgeting, capital budgeting and net present value analysis, time value of money, cost / benefit analysis, goal seeking, scenario planning and pivot tables. Prerequisites: BUAD 311, Excel Office Specialist certification or instructor permission.

BUAD 315 BUSINESS LAW

Study includes: sales, commercial paper, secured transactions, corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, and agency. Prerequisite: BUAD 210.

BUAD 320 PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT

Introduction to the field of land management in the petroleum industry. Covers the necessary knowledge and skills of the petroleum land professional, both in the U.S. and internationally. Topics include land survey systems, mineral ownership and severance, as well as oil and gas leases. Examines other oil and gas exploration and development phases. State and federal leasing is covered. Prerequisites admission into the PLRM program, or instructor permission.

BUAD 325 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

A study of how managers can and should be involved with systems planning, development, and implementation; what information systems resources are available to managers for decision support; and how information and technology can be used to support business strategy. Also, this course takes a managerial approach to information systems concepts and applications in business, while exposing the student to various types of software in the business sector. Prerequisite: BUAD 220 or CIS 120.

BUAD 330 MINING LAND MANAGEMENT

An examination of the impact of technology on traditional business functions including management, marketing, operations and distribution. Areas of study include the Internet, Intranets, and extranets, and their influence on business to consumer, business to business, and consumer to consumer e-commerce. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission.

BUAD 331 FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT

Prepares students for management of sales, food cost controls, beverage cost controls, labor, personnel, sanitation, and market analysis as they relate to the resort industry. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 150; or instructor permission.

BUAD 332 RENTAL AND RETAIL MANAGEMENT

An introduction to operating rental and retail-profit centers as part of a corporation involved in the resort industry. Topics covered include managing personnel, equipment, training, traffic flow, buying, forecasting, and accounting. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 150; or instructor permission.

BUAD 333 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

Provides students an understanding of human behavior in organizations today. Students will become familiar with the basic dimensions of organizational behavior covering topics such as leadership, motivation, management of people, and group dynamics. The course stresses an experimental approach as well as the personal nature of the material and how this relates to the complexities of behavior in and of organizations. Prerequisite: BUAD 309 or COTH 202; or instructor permission.

BUAD 334 LODGING OPERATIONS

A focus on organizational structure and front office positions. Topics covered include reservation, registration and rooming process; management, financial, and policy control procedures; and organization, staffing, and functions of housekeeping departments Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 150; or instructor permission.

BUAD 335 MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

Advertising, sales promotions, media utilization, public relations, and personal selling are highlighted in this course. Legal regulations and ethical considerations in mass media advertising and promotions are also covered. Finally, the student is exposed to the principles of planning and budgeting for such media events. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ACC 201 with a minimum grade of "C"; BUAD 270; or instructor permission.

BUAD 337 HOSPITALITY LAW AND RISK MANAGEMENT

Provides an awareness of the rights and responsibilities that the law grants to or imposes upon a hotelkeeper and illustrates the possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations. Also included is risk management as a means of mitigating exposure to lawsuits and fines. Prerequisites: BUAD 150; BUAD 210; or instructor permission.

BUAD 340 GLOBAL BUSINESS

Provides an awareness of the rights and responsibilities that the law grants to or imposes upon a hotelkeeper and illustrates the possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations. Also included is risk management as a means of mitigating exposure to lawsuits and fines. Prerequisites: BUAD 150; BUAD 210; or instructor permission.

BUAD 345 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

Utilizing theories from the behavioral sciences, this course provides an in-depth examination of the individual customer learning and decision-making processes, segmentation, as well as culture, subculture, and social class relationships with marketing. Students develop an understanding of consumers' shopping behavior, utilization of different marketing channels, perception of products, and reactions to advertising and other selling methods. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 270; or instructor permission.

BUAD 350 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Provides students with an understanding of the functions, content and challenges of Human Resource Management (HRM) in organizations today. Insights will be developed on basic dimensions of HRM such as recruitment, selection, performance management, rewards and retention, as well as particular challenges concerning strategic HRM and global environments. Emphasis is placed on how the complexities of HRM relate to students' past and future experiences as members of organizations. Prerequisites: BUAD 309 or COTH 202 or instructor permission.

BUAD 360 MANAGERIAL FINANCE

An introductory course to the field of managerial finance, covering such topics as financial analysis, time value of money, risk/return analysis, capital budgeting, working capital management, cost of capital, and optimal capital structure. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission.

BUAD 363 BUSINESS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

A focus on the impact on the environment of human presence and absence. There is a consideration of various "green practices" that result in both positive environmental impacts and cost savings to industry, and examination of governmental initiatives regarding various business practices and their expected impacts on the environment, on businesses' bottom lines, and on consumers. Course material emphasizes videos, readings, and guest lectures. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission.

BUAD 375 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS PLANNING

Provides the future entrepreneur with the skills and insights necessary to minimize risks associated with the undertaking of a new business venture. The primary focus is for each student to prepare a complete business plan for a proposed business enterprise. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 270; BUAD 333 or BUAD 350;BUAD 360; or instructor permission.

BUAD 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission.

BUAD 410 WATER AND ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

A comprehensive case law study of water and environmental law, addressing the historical development of the riparian, prior appropriation, Federal and Indian water rights doctrines, and the emergence of Federal and State environmental law and policy, specifically addressing how water law and environmental law interface with and impact each other. This course will develop a knowledge base fundamental to the preparation of a student in the PLRM emphasis. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission. BUAD 210 recommended.

BUAD 420 OIL AND GAS LAW AND CONTRACTS

Includes the nature and protection of oil and gas rights, conveying oil and gas rights, oil and gas leasing, as well as tax and other business matters. Case law based study of jurisprudence affecting the oil and gas industry. Emphasis is on oil and gas titles, leases, contracts, and mineral ownership. State regulation is also emphasized and international case studies are discussed. Prerequisites: admission into the PLRM program; BUAD 305; BUAD 320; or instructor permission. BUAD 330 recommended as a corequisite.

BUAD 425 MARKETING RESEARCH

The focus of this course is the collection, analysis, and interpretation of marketing data for reporting research information necessary to make informed marketing decisions. Students develop skills in defining research problems, designing surveys, experiments, and observational studies, managing data collection, performing data analysis, and communicating results. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 270; or instructor permission. BUAD 335 and BUAD 345 recommended.

BUAD 461 INVESTMENTS

A study of the many investments available for individual portfolios. Emphasis is placed on the risks inherent in investments and the methods and techniques of analysis used in selecting securities for investments. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 360; or instructor permission.

BUAD 482 HOSPITALITY OPERATION MANAGEMENT

An integration of management functions learned in previous classes into a workable approach to profitable resort operations. Students are encouraged to take this course during their last semester; graduating seniors are given priority in enrollment. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 331; BUAD 332; BUAD 334; BUAD 337; BUAD 360;or instructor permission.

BUAD 485 QUANTITATIVE DECISION MAKING

A course in managerial decision making that emphasizes the use of computer spreadsheets to organize, analyze, and present quantitative information to aid managerial decision-making. The course includes quantitative topics from a wide variety of business functions, including production, human resources, accounting, finance, marketing, and information systems. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 360; or instructor permission.

BUAD 491 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

The formal analysis of an organization's macro and industry environment; its mission and goals; and strategy formulation, implementation, and control. This is a capstone course which integrates the student's knowledge from the areas of accounting, finance, marketing, and management. Students are encouraged to take this course during their last semester; graduating seniors are given priority in enrollment. Prerequisites: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 309; BUAD 333 or 350; BUAD 360; and senior standing.

BUAD 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A singular investigation into a unique problem to be determined jointly by the researcher and the advisor. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission.

BUAD 494 ENTREPRENEURIAL ANALYSIS AND CONSULTING

An investigation of emerging problems and issues relevant to small businesses. This is accomplished through two techniques: l) studying current business journal articles, and 2) working with a local small-business owner to solve a specific problem facing his or her business. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; BUAD 375; or instructor permission.

BUAD 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission.

BUAD 499 INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS ADM

A course designed specifically for junior- and senior-level students. Internships provide guided, counseled, and progressive experience under a dual-tutelage program of a businessperson and an academician. An academically monitored activity to assure quality experience. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: completion of Base Curriculum; or instructor permission.

CHEM 100 CONTEMPORARY CHEMISTRY

An introductory course which addresses the basic facts and principles of chemistry, as well as the history of chemistry, practical aspects of chemistry, and relevance of chemistry. Topics covered in the course are dependent on the instructor and contemporary events. This course is designed for non-science majors without a background in chemistry or mathematics and may not be counted toward the Chemistry Major or Minor.

CHEM 101 INTRODUCTION TO INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

A survey of inorganic chemistry, with an emphasis on chemical principles, atomic theory, periodic law, chemical equilibrium, equations, solutions, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. This course is designed for non-majors without a background in chemistry or mathematics and may not be counted toward the Chemistry Major or Minor.

CHEM 111 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

An introductory course designed for science majors focusing on principles and applications of chemistry. Topics covered in this course are stoichiometry, bonding models, intermolecular forces, and periodic trends. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 140 or Accuplacer college-level mathematics test score of 85 or above, ACT math score of 24 or above, or instructor permission.

CHEM 112 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

An introduction to basic laboratory techniques of inorganic chemistry correlating with CHEM 111. Experiments emphasize techniques, instrumentation, and solution chemistry. laboratory notebook keeping and the safe handling and disposal of laboratory chemicals are also stressed. Corequisite: CHEM 111.

CHEM 113 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

A continuation of CHEM 111. Topics covered in this course are thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 111.

CHEM 114 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORYORATORYRATRY II

A continuation of CHEM 112. An introduction to basic laboratory techniques of inorganic chemistry correlating with CHEM 113. Experiments emphasize techniques, instrumentation, and solution chemistry. laboratory notebook keeping and the safe handling and disposal of laboratory chemicals are also stressed. Prerequisite: CHEM 112. Corequisite: CHEM 113.

CHEM 197 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

CHEM 231 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY

A descriptive survey course which introduces the essential topics and applications of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The course is designed for non-majors who need the second semester of a one-year chemistry core that includes general, organic, and biochemistry. This course may not be counted for credit toward the Chemistry Major or Minor. Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or CHEM 113.

CHEM 234 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY

An introductory laboratory to accompany CHEM 231. Experiments focus on reactions of organic functional groups, organic synthesis, and the chemistry of biological molecules. This course may not be counted for credit toward the Chemistry Major or Minor. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 231.

CHEM 297 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

CHEM 306 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY WITH LABORATORY

A lecture/laboratory course involving principles, techniques and calculations involved with quantitative analysis of substances. Includes solution chemistry, gravimetric, volumetric, redox, and pH determinations. Prerequisites: CHEM 113 and CHEM 114.

CHEM 331 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

First semester course of a two semester organic chemistry sequence. This course is an in depth study of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Topics include their naming, electronic structure, bonding, reactivity, stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms Prerequisite: CHEM 113.

CHEM 332 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

A continuation of CHEM 331. This course discusses spectroscopic analysis, physical, and chemical properties of organic functional groups. Emphasis includes synthesis, mechanisms, and reactions of aromatic compounds, carbonyl containing compounds, and amines. Prerequisite: CHEM 331.

CHEM 334 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

An accompanying laboratory course for CHEM 331, serving as an introduction to basic macro-and micro- scale organic techniques used to separate, isolate, and characterize organic compounds. Methods utilized include distillation, extraction, chromatography, Infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 114. Corequisite: CHEM 331.

CHEM 335 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

This LABORATORY is a continuation of CHEM 334, with an expansion in scope that allows incorporation of more complex synthetic problems. The LABORATORY will employ the use of thin layer chromatography (TLC) to follow reaction progress along with NMR spectroscopy to determine reaction outcomes. Prerequisite: CHEM 334. Corequisite: CHEM 332.

CHEM 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

CHEM 401 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS

An examination of the theory and techniques of instrumental methods of quantitative analysis, including spectrophotometric methods, electrochemical methods, and chromatography. Offered in alternate years, 2010-2011. Prerequisites: CHEM 306.

CHEM 402 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS LABORATORY

An introduction to instrumental techniques, principles, calculations, and applications for qualitative, quantitative, and structural analysis. Offered in alternate years, 2010-2011. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 401.

CHEM 451 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

A detailed study of thermodynamics, phase equilibria, kinetic theory and chemical kinetics. Offered in alternate years, 2011-2012. Prerequisites: CHEM 113, MATH 251, and PHYS 201

CHEM 452 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

A continuation of CHEM 451, which examines quantum chemistry, atomic, and molecular structure and spectra, photochemistry, and statistical mechanics. Offered in alternate years, 2011-2012. Prerequisites: CHEM 451.

CHEM 454 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

An experimental-techniques course in physical chemistry (including computer-assisted instruction), with emphasis on thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics, and spectroscopy. Offered in alternate years, 2011-2012. Corequisite: CHEM 452 or PHYS 452.

CHEM 461 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Inorganic chemistry based on principles of bonding, structure, and reaction mechanisms. Chemistry of representative and transition elements and their compounds are covered. Offered in alternate years, 2010-2011. Prerequisite: CHEM 113, SCI 202, and MATH 251.

CHEM 471 BIOCHEMISTRY I

An introductory biochemistry course, examining the chemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids. Intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids are introduced. Additional topics include respiration and photosynthesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 332. BIOL 150 is highly recommended.

CHEM 472 BIOCHEMISTRY II WITH LABORATORY

A continuation of CHEM 471. A study of the molecular mechanisms by which cellular processes are controlled in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics include the biochemistry of macromolecular processes, the structure of genes and chromosomes, the genetic and molecular techniques used to study gene expression, and the transcriptional and translational control of gene expression. The laboratory includes recombinant DNA techniques to manipulate the genome of a model organism. Prerequisites: BIOL 312 and CHEM 471.

CHEM 494 RESEARCH PROBLEMS

An advanced, supervised laboratory or library research experience involving methods of chemical research in an area of analytical, physical, organic, or biochemistry. A research paper and oral presentation of research results is required. Prerequisite: SCI 202.

CHEM 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

CIS 120 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS

An in-depth study of the essentials of word-processing, spreadsheets, and information management, using modern computers and software. Substantial student competence in these areas is required for further study at the College. Applications are presented from various fields.

CIS 150 COMPUTERS IN SOCIETY

An introduction to the use of computing devices and their impact on society. Topics include: how computers work, the history of computing, philosophical issues in computing, the economics of software development, intellectual property issues, privacy and security, applications of computing, legal issues, the digital divide, the role of computing in government, and computer-assisted collaboration.

CIS 160 INTRODUCTION TO WEB DESIGN

CIS 160 Web Design for the Nontechnical Person. An introduction to the basics of the XHTML web page specification language, cascading style sheets (CSS) and the Plone Content Management System (CMS). Students learn to create attractive, professional web pages and websites using XHTML and CSS, including embedded graphics and multimedia. The student also learns to use a CMS for easier web page implementation, including add-ons such as forums and shopping carts.

CIS 190 COMPUTER SCIENCE I

An introduction to software development. Students develop text, graphical user interface (GUI) and applet web graphical applications using object oriented techniques in Java. Emphasis is placed on good software engineering practices for problem analysis, program design, documentation, testing and debugging.

CIS 191 COMPUTER SCIENCE II

A continuation of CIS 190 taught in the Java programming language. Students develop stand alone GUI and console applications and applets of increasing sophistication. Topics include: arrays, objects and classes, encapsulation and inheritance, file management, dynamic data structures, searching, sorting, recursion, stacks and queues, with emphasis on abstraction and implementation and an introduction to algorithm analysis. Prerequisite: CIS 190 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 192 INDEPENDENT STUDY I

A singular investigation into a unique problem agreed upon by the student and advisor. Independent Studies (CIS 192,292,392,492) may be repeated for a total of up to 12 credits.

CIS 195 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

An introduction to the practice and principles of relational database design, implementation and manipulation. Topics include: Structured Query Language (SQL), relational models, Entity-Relationship modeling, security, multi-user databases, transactions, Object Relational Mapping and database administration. Students will design and implement relational database applications of increasing complexity. Prerequisite: CIS 190 with a minimum grade of "C-"; prerequisite or corequisite: CIS 191.

CIS 235 COMPUTER NETWORKS

An investigation of the transmission of data and information between computer systems. Topics include simple data communications, protocols, error control, local-area networks, wide-area networks such as the Internet packet-switching networks, and various networking models. Various data communication hardware and software are also examined. Prerequisites: CIS 191 with a minimum grade of "C-"; MATH 140 or above excluding MATH 209 and MATH 210 or Accuplacer College-Level Mathematics score of 75 or above.

CIS 250 WEB APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT I

A course studying modern web site design, focusing on embedded languages, the use of audio and visual plug-ins, web application servers, and the tools that aid development on a professional scale. Basic use of Structured Query Language is studied. Cross platform development, applications to e-commerce, Internet and Intranet are considered. At least one major project is required. Offered in alternate years, 2010-2011. Prerequisites: CIS 191 with a minimum grade of "C-"; MATH 140 or above excluding MATH 209 and MATH 210 or Accuplacer College-Level Mathematics score of 75 or above.

CIS 275 SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMING, MODELING SIMULATION

Designed to develop programming skills appropriate for scientific and industrial applications. Topics may include numerical solution of differential equations, singular value decomposition, and Fourier analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling, algorithm development and data visualization. Prerequisite: CIS 190 and MATH 151 with a minimum grades of "C-".

CIS 280 DATA STRUCTURES

A survey of advanced data structures and algorithms. Topics include: linear lists, linked lists, arrays, tree, multi-linked lists, hashing, searching, sorting, recursion and analysis of the algorithms that use these structures. Taught in Java. Prerequisites: CIS 191 with a minimum grade of 'C-'; MATH 140 or above excluding MATH 209 and MATH 210 or Accuplacer College-Level Mathematics score of 75 or above.

CIS 292 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A singular investigation into a unique problem agreed upon by the student and the advisor. Independent Studies (CIS 192, 292,392,492) may be repeated for a total of up to 12 credit.

CIS 300 INTRO COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE W/ ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE

An introduction to computer organization using assembly-language programming. Topics include numeral systems, byte instructions, branching, indexing, computer arithmetic, subroutines, logical operators, and I/O. The fundamental concepts and terminology associated with computer hardware systems are also covered. The physical and electronic components of a computer, including processing units, memory units, and input/output devices are surveyed. Prerequisite: CIS 280 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 310 VISUAL PROGRAMMING

A focus on common environment and design tools used in the development and implementation of graphic user interfaces. Emphasis is placed on the automation of tasks and the customization of systems by programming constructs. Applications are developed for both a local environment and a broad-based use of the Internet. The implementation language is C++ or Visual Basic. May be repeated with a different implementation language. Prerequisite: CIS 191 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 320 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

An investigation of the theory, usage, and implementation of programming languages. Emphasis is on the theoretical basis for programming languages and practical examples of their use. Basic language paradigms are developed: imperative, functional, object-oriented, and logic. Other topics include type systems and language translation. Languages studied include C, C++, Java, Lisp, Haskell, Prolog, and Python. Prerequisite: CIS 280 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 330 OPERATING SYSTEMS W/UNIX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION

A study of the major components of operating systems, such as job and resource management in both multiprogramming and multiprocessing systems. Additionally, an introduction to the UNIX operating system includes UNIX commands, the role of the system administrator, the file system, controlling processes, programming in the shell, the network file system, and security. Prerequisite: CIS 300 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 350 WEB APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT II

A study of client-server applications designed around the World Wide Web. Students design and implement applications which provide access to centralized resources such as databases and mail servers from web browsers. Students utilize Perl, CGI, and SQL to construct applications such as an online shopping site, an enterprise document server, or a shared Intranet database. Security of data during transmission and storage is emphasized. Prerequisite: CIS 250 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 375 NUMERICAL METHODS

Designed to provide students with the skills needed to solve mathematical problems using a computer. Topics include: computer arithmetic, roots of a single equation, nonlinear simultaneous equations, matrices, determinants, linear simultaneous equations, numerical integration, differential equations, interpolation, curve fitting, and other topics as time permits. Prerequisites: CIS 275 or CIS 280 with a minimum grade of "C-"; and MATH 151.

CIS 391 COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE SEMINAR

An advanced topic in computing, selected by the instructor from areas of computer science not usually included in the regular curriculum, conducted in a lecture, seminar or individualized format. Student involvement through presentations is emphasized. May be taken under different topics for a total of three credits. Prerequisite: CIS 191 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

CIS 410 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

The fundamental concepts of systems analysis and design are studied in the context of computerized information systems. Topics include high-level system construction tools, system design methodology, data representation languages such as XML, server-based system design, web services, system security, and system description languages such as UML. Also addressed is the human element in system design: working with users and domain experts to develop system requirements, and understanding the challenges of large scale system projects. Each student completes a number of systems design projects during the term. Prerequisite: CIS 310 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 412 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

An introduction to the fundamental principles of software engineering. Formal software development techniques and high-level software tools are emphasized. Students are taught a programming method based on the recognition and description of useful abstractions. Topics include encapsulation and reuse, design patterns, object based design, software testing and quality, formal methods for software design, and project management. Students are expected to complete a significant project that employs techniques from the topics studied. Prerequisite: CIS 410 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 430 COMPUTER GRAPHICS

A presentation of the design and use of computer-graphics systems (hardware and software) and construction of two- and three-dimensional graphics. Applications of computer graphics in business, industry, education, and communications are emphasized. Prerequisite: CIS 280 with a minimum grade of "C-."

CIS 450 MOBILE DEVICE PROGRAMMING: X

An introduction to software development for mobile devices such as smart phones and tablet computers. Specific platforms include, among others, OIS (Apple) and Android. The course covers interface elements and device capabilities such as photo, video and sound, accelerometer, GPS and web services. Students are expected to complete a significant project that employs techniques specific to mobile platforms. May be repeated with a different implementation platform. Prerequisite: CIS 280 with a minimum of "C-"

CIS 480 COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE APPLICATION PROJECT

Students develop a comprehensive application project in the area of their specialization. Possible projects include software development, CAI program development, systems analysis consultation with area businesses, or development of a computer hardware/software training program. A public presentation of the project is made before the CIS faculty and students. Prerequisite: 24 credits of CIS course work, including 12 upper-division credits.

CIS 490 WORKSHOP IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

A series of organized meetings dealing with a topic of current interest. Offered periodically in a variety of computer-related subjects. Only three credits of this title can be applied toward a Computer Information Science Minor.

CIS 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A singular investigation into a unique problem agreed upon by the student and the advisor. Independent Studies (CIS 192, CIS 292, CIS 392, and CIS 492) may be repeated for a total of up to 12 credits.

CIS 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

CIS 499 INTERNSHIP IN CCOMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

Students participate in a supervised field experience with a cooperating firm in the computer science field. The sponsoring faculty member provides evaluations during periodic visitations. A formal paper is required of the student. Specific department requirements must be met to participate in this course. Prerequisite: 18 credits of Computer Information Science course work, including nine upper-division credits.

COM 119 INTRODUCTION TO FILM

Students are introduced to the aesthetics of narrative and documentary motion pictures through the study of the basic elements of cinema. Topics may include story structure, cinematography, editing, sound, and lighting.

COM 121 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE

This course will include a general survey of Western theatre from Classical Greece to contemporary America. Students will learn the diverse practice of the art of theatre by studying theatre history, dramatic literature, and the practical components of acting, directing, design and production.

COM 151 INTRODUCTION TO MASS MEDIA

An examination of media-related industries (broadcasting, journalism, advertising, public relations and online communications), and the issues related to those industries that affect contemporary public discourse.

COM 202 ACADEMIC WRITING AND INQUIRY

Students expand on the process and techniques begun in Academic Writing. Primary focus is on analytical written communication and on advocacy oral communication. Also included throughout the course is the reading of relevant academic professional writing, which promotes student awareness of the role of written and oral communication in academic and professional life. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

COM 205 COMMUNICATION ARTS I

This course is a study of the theory and associated terminology of visual communication including the application of concepts to film, theatre, and convergent media. Topics include aesthetics, design elements, mimesis, performance, semiotics and introduction to the primary techniques of the various communication arts. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

COM 216 DRAMATIC LITERATURE AND SCRIPT ANALYSIS

This course introduces students to the diverse genre of dramatic literature in Western and Eastern theatre. Students study the origins of tragedy, comedy, melodrama, the rise of Realism and Anti-Realism, as well as the sub-genres within those general categories. Eastern traditions of text such as Kabuki, Noh, and Bunraku are also studied. Students learn how to read a play on a deeper level for content, themes, historical and sociopolitical influences, as well as the emerging and changing aesthetics of each genre. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM 231 TECHNICAL PRODUCTION I

A study of how things are done behind the scenes in theatre and film and why they are done that way, including the basic customs and traditions of production work and the philosophy, aesthetics, and process of production. Intensive hands-on development of skills in the construction of sets, costumes, lights, sound, and props; the operation of rolling units, lights, flies, and sound; and production assistant duties.

COM 235 FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING

An introduction to the principles, processes, and techniques of acting. The study is designed to balance theory and performance; to explore in detail the psychological, perceptual, and conceptual linkages to the strategies, techniques, and skills of the actor; and to develop a significant sense of self-discipline on the part of the actor. Topics include warm-up and awareness skills, basic body and voice integration techniques, the theories of Stanislavski, character analysis, and performance process

COM 241 MEDIA WRITING

An analysis and practice of the major forms of media writing, including print, broadcast and web-based publication, with an introduction to the ways that production varies the writing of each. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

COM 261 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIO COMMUNICATION

This course introduces the basic concepts, functions and technology of audio production as they relate to the elements of narrative and storytelling. Prerequisite COM 119, COM 121, or COM 151; or instructor permission.

COM 264 INTRODUCTION TO PRODUCTION AND THEORY

An introduction to the theory and practice of media production including critical and aesthetic theories. Topics may include scriptwriting, producing, directing, cinematography, sound recording, editing, and standards of operation for production facilities and equipment. Prerequisites: COM 205, COM 261, and sophomore standing; or instructor permission. 

COM 264 INTRODUCTION TO PRODUCTION AND THEORY

An introduction to the theory and practice of media production including critical and aesthetic theories. Topics may include scriptwriting, producing, directing, cinematography, sound recording, editing, and standards of operation for production facilities and equipment. Prerequisites: COM 205, COM 261, and sophomore standing; or instructor permission.

COM 274 PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMUNICATION

A study of the use of communication to establish credibility, trust, and confidence between and among communities, employees, public agencies, civic organizations and business institutions.

COM 284 SOPHOMORE PORTFOLIO

A course in which students familiarize themselves with the requirements for the Communication Arts program and related capstone project, formulate specific goals, and prepare strategies through which those goals can be achieved. Students will develop an awareness of field-specific expectations required of them in professional or graduate-level work, and develop a plan for creating a portfolio that reflects that awareness. A part of the course consists of formally of applying for admission to the Communication Arts program. Prerequisite or corequisite: COM 205 or instructor permission.

COM 297 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

COM 298 PRACTICUM

Entry-level supervised experiences in theatre, organizational communication and journalism/mass media. Prerequisite: instructor permission.

COM 305 COMMUNICATION ARTS II

An exploration of the philosophical and theoretical foundations of human communication, concentrating specifically on textual analysis and interpretation. Using a wide range of media, students will investigate how the particular method of communication informs, alters, and shapes the messages being consumed, and how those messages both constitute and affect self-expressive acts. PREREQUISITES: COM 205 and admission to the Communication Arts Program; or instructor permission.

COM 306 SCRIPTWRITING

An introduction to the fundamental tools and skills required to craft a script for performance on stage or in film/video. Students are expected to produce play scripts and screenplays of varying lengths; they are also expected to read and respond to one another's writing. Some history of playwriting and study of prevailing models of script- writing are also included. Prerequisites: COM 205 and COM 222, or ENG 205, with a minimum grade of "C."

COM 310 INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE STUDIES

An interdisciplinary course exploring the human desire to perform in both aesthetic and everyday settings. It explores the links between the arts and literature, anthropology, communication, sociology, and philosophy. Critical reading, written analysis, and performance of lit-erary texts are essential elements of the course.

COM 317 STUDIES IN THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE

An introduction to performance studies research and artistic practice through readings, discussion and creative work. Prerequisites: junior standing and instructor permission. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits among different topic areas.

COM 323 MEDIA/ ARTS MANAGEMENT

An introduction to the basic principles and structure of management as it applies to Communication Arts. Particular focus is given to management of small and mid-size nonprofit media and arts organizations, and to the interrelationship between those two areas. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COM 324 ADVANCED ACTING

An advanced-level course that focuses on specific areas of actor training, including methods of voice and movement training; the requirements and techniques of different styles of acting including classical, Elizabethan, Restoration/18th Century, Commedia, and Advanced Contemporary acting styles; and advanced textual analysis required of actors by specific theatrical works. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits among different topic areas. Prerequisite: COM 235

COM 327 PERFORMERS FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

An in-depth look at the role of performance, predominantly theatre, for social change and community activism. Students learn about the historical movements combining performance and social change, study the theories behind the practice influenced by Paulo Freire and Augusto Boal, and have hands-on opportunities to train their own performance and writing skills in this manner. Prerequisite: instruct-tor permission.

COM 330 TECHNICAL PRODUCTION II

Instruction is provided in the proper rigging of light and sound equipment, use of control consoles and software, optics, basic electrical theory, the nature of light, and acoustics. The design and aesthetic use of light and sound are also explored. Prerequisite: COM 231 or instructor permission

COM 331 SCENOGRAPHY IN FILM AND THEATRE

A study of designing visually for the stage and screen, with an emphasis on a unified look and a single intense effect. A strong emphasis on script analysis as a basis for design. Additional information on visual research for theatre and film including location scouting and contextual research into the background of the story. Hands-on development of skills in generating graphic communication of design ideas is included. Prerequisite: COM 231 or instructor permission.

COM 346 MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATION

An exploration of the theory and application of multimedia communication principles through projects that use common interactive multimedia, animation, non-linear editing, web authoring, and desktop-publishing programs. Prerequisites: COM 219, or instructor permission.

COM 351 MEDIA THEORY AND RESEARCH

An examination of media from a theoretical, organizational perspective. Topics covered include departmental functions and duties, programming, formats, regulations and finances. Also, in the context of media theory, empirical data is explored. Prerequisite: COM 241 and COM 274, or instructor permission.

COM 352 ADVANCED CINEMA STUDIES

An in-depth study of the aesthetics and theory of cinema through the examination and critical analysis of the technical and creative elements of selected iconic Hollywood and international motion pictures. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COM 362 ADVANCED AUDIO PRODUCTION

An in-depth study of audio design and production for film, radio, television and live theatre. Prerequisite COM 261.

COM 371 SMALL GROUP CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

An exploration of various concepts and types of conflict and the role of argumentation in managing and/or resolving conflict. The study examines the theory and practice of communication within small groups, as well as problem solving and decision making as common contexts in which argument occurs and conflict arises, and a continuum from formal to informal modes of conflict management/resolution is discussed and practiced by the students. Examples of specific areas covered include formal debate, negotiation, and arbitration. Prerequisite: COM 202.

COM 372 ISSUES MANAGEMENT

An exploration of the communication practices and strategies used by organizations to react to current events, publicity, and society. Emphasis is placed upon persuasion, media relations, and information campaigns.

COM 389 MEDIA PRODUCTION: NARRATIVE

An introduction to the theory and practice of the field-based production of narrative films. Topics emphasized may include fictional story, cinematography, lighting, sound, editing, and production management. Prerequisite: COM 264 with a minimum grade of C

COM 390 MEDIA PRODUCTION: DOCUMENTARY

An introduction to the theory and practice of producing nonfiction works, including conventional documentary forms and autobiographical or experimental works. Topics may include actual story, cinematography, lighting, sound, editing, and production management. Prerequisite: COM 264 with a minimum grade of C

COM 392 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A detailed study in a specific area of communication and theatre, emphasizing individualized approaches toward development of creativity and scholarship. Prerequisites: junior or senior status and 10 credits in Communication and Theatre.

COM 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

COM 398 PRACTICUM

Supervised applications and experiences in communication and theatre. Students assist, analyze, manage, and participate in various aspects of practical situations or job training. Prerequisites: instructor permission and completion of one of the following: COM 241, COM 261, or COM 298.

COM 405 COMMUNICATION ARTS III

A multi-disciplinary and multi-media course offering significant historical, theoretical, and practical content by which to explore and discuss how meaning is conveyed in communication. Special emphasis is given to the nature of oral communication in oral societies and to the nature and function of myth, symbol, sign, and inferential reasoning. Prerequisites: COM 305 or instructor permission.

COM 406 ADVANCED SCREENWRITING AND PRODUCING

Students are immersed in advanced screenwriting projects and pitching for independent feature film, television drama and situation comedy. Producing content may include such topics as contract law, releases, copyright, fair use, ethics, location and talent management, production management, and other administrative subject matter pertaining to film and television production. Prerequisite: COM 306 with a minimum grade of C.

COM 423 PRESENTATIONAL ASTHETICS

An examination of the theatrical performance convention from the perspective of the adaptor, director, and performer. This course offers invigorating challenges for the director, dramaturge, actor, and designer who will work collaboratively to explore presentational mode, theatrical convention, and conscious artifice in the performance of dramatic literature, poetry, nonfiction, and prose fiction. Prerequisites: COM 231, COM 235, COM 310 and minimum junior standing; or instructor permission.

COM 423 PRESENTATIONAL AESTHETICS

An examination of the theatrical performance convention from the perspective of the adaptor, director, and performer.  This course offers invigorating challenges for the director, dramaturg, actor, and designer who will work collaboratively to explore presentational mode, theatrical convention, and conscious artifice in the performance of dramatic literature, poetry, nonfiction, and prose fiction.  Prerequisites: COM 231, COM 235, COM 310 and a minimum junior standing; or instructor permission.

COM 474 CAMPAIGN PLANNING IN ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC INFORMATION

An analysis of the many facets of information campaign planning. It explores concepts like persuasion and audience behavior, researching attitudes and effectiveness, campaign objectives and strategies, media choices, and relevant social and ethical issues. In addition, students are expected to build their own information campaigns. Prerequisite: COM 274.

COM 484 COMMUNICATION ARTS SEMINAR

A capstone course in which students complete their individual Communication Arts portfolios, based upon their cumulative work through the COM program and guided by their specific career or graduate school goals. The seminar provides an opportunity for students to work individually, in small groups, and with the instructor to evaluate the overall effectiveness of their finished portfolios, and revise accordingly, utilizing the critical techniques, cultural awareness, and technical skills students have developed throughout the COM program. Prerequisite: COM 305

COM 490 ADVANCED MEDIA PRODUCTION

Students are immersed in advanced project work. Topics may include cinematography, lighting, grip, electrical, special effects, visual effects, sound effects recording, sound design, and animation. Prerequisite: COM 389 or COM 390 with a minimum grade of C

COM 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

COM 499 INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION ARTS

Internship to be determined and arranged with program and department.

CRWR 520 SUMMER INTENSIVE I

Focuses on writing workshops that teach students how to research, edit, and hone their work, and submit it for publication. Familiarizes students with aesthetics of different literary magazines, and the aesthetic of the book the course prepares for production. Teaches introductory skills and orientation for online work for the subsequent year of study. This course is offered as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisite: Registration for the publishing course of studies.

CRWR 521 EDITORIAL PRACTICUM I

Involves students in an acquisitions editorial staff that reads and evaluates submissions for publication in the book project for the year. Students review submissions ahead of time and e-mail comments to acquisitions editor on whether work should be considered by entire board, and then participate in online discussions every other week Students also meet online three times to discuss materials from learning modules, and how that information relates to book project and their duties as editors and publishers. Prerequisites: CRWR 520. Co-requisites: CRWR 521, CRWR 522, CRWR 523.

CRWR 522 EDITORIAL SKILLS

Focuses on the topics of 1) identifying potential authors and conducting author outreach; 2) market analysis; 3) working with agents and book packagers; 4) the author contract; and 5) editorial review groups - who participates and why. This course is offered as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisite: CRWR 520. Co-requisites: CRWR 521, CRWR 523, CRWR 524.

CRWR 523 ACQUISITIONS

Teaches the topics of 1) what an editor does (and does not do); 2) what "house style" is and how books conform; 3) steps from developmental edit to copyedit to proofread; and 4) appropriate interaction with authors. Offered as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisite: CRWR 520. Co-requisites: CRWR 521, CRWR 522, CRWR 524.

CRWR 524 BUSINESS MODELS FOR PRESS HOUSES

Familiarizes students with traditional publishing house models such as nonprofit, for-profit, academic press, and trade press, as well as the emerging online electronic delivery models of publishing. This is offered as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisite: CRWR 520. Co-requisites: CRWR 521, CRWR 522, CRWR 523.

CRWR 525 EDITORIAL PRACTICUM II

Involves students in an acquisitions editorial staff that will select, proof, and ready submissions for publication of the book project for the year. Students participate in online discussions every week, meeting as an editorial board to select submissions for publication in the book project for the year. Students finalize selections, proof work, and ready book for publication. Also meets online three times to discuss materials from learning modules, and how that information relates to book project and their duties as editors and publishers. Offered for Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisites: CRWR 521. Co-requisites: CRWR 526, CRWR 527, CRWR 528.

CRWR 526 DESIGN AND LAYOUT

Provides students with an understanding of such design and layout consideration as typography, use of graphics, cover design, interior book layout, creating an index, interaction with printers, as well as alternative considerations for electronic and e-reader delivery. Offered for Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisite: CRWR 521. Co-requisites: CRWR 525, CRWR 527, CRWR 528.

CRWR 527 MARKETING AND SALES

Familiarizes student with the topics of 1) the role of the author in marketing and selling a book; 2) the marketing done prior to book publication and what happens after release; 3) effective public relations; 4) sales model-direct, bookstores/retail, hybrid distributions; and electronic promotion, marketing, and delivery; 5) selling books in-house by team, by distribution, and by commissioned reps; 6) tracking and evaluating sales. Offered for Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisites: CRWR 521. Co-requisites: CRWR 525, CRWR 526, CRWR 528.

CRWR 528 BACK OFFICE AND FULFILLMENT

Covers accounting and inventory issues, customer service, warehousing and shipping of physical book inventory, as well as electronic delivery systems. This course is offered for Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisites: CRWR 521. Co-requisites: CRWR 525, CRWR 526, CRWR 527.

CRWR 530 SUMMER INTENSIVE II

Focuses on final preparation of the product as well as formulating and launching a marketing plan for distribution. This is offered for Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisite: CRWR 525.

CRWR 597 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics - studies to be determined by faculty, department and student.

CRWR 600 SUMMER ORIENTATION

Focus on learning mastery of online tools, attending faculty and student readings, and meeting with non-residency mentors during first summer; focus on attending presentations and participating in workshop sessions during second summer; and focus on presenting student thesis as well as attending and participating in other readings during third summer. Must be repeated three times for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 601 PATTERNS AND PARADIGMS FOR MAINSTREAM GENRE WRITING

Focus on student exploration of texts that set patterns for various forms of genre writing, and use those patterns as the basis for their own writing. Reading includes contemporary texts, folktales and myths that establish the archetypal basis for narrative patterns in plot, setting and character development. Also lays the groundwork for students to articulate and work efficiently within their own writing process, and for students to establish effective writing practices for long-term use. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 602 FICTION WRKSHOP AND TRANSLATION

Focus on work shopping students' writing projects, with a focus on developing material for the thesis. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 604 PRE AND POST-PUBLICATION PROMOTION

Focus on the practical aspects of dealing with current market demands for writers, with a focus on self-promotion both before and after publication. Work includes public reading of theses, pitches, and interviews; discussion and practice in using the internet and social networking media for promoting writing; and an exploration of opportunities available from writers grants and fellowships. Session also includes a 'mentoring' component, where graduating students hold mentoring sessions with new students. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 605 WRITING PEDAGOGY STRATEGIES

An opportunity to develop lesson plans, sample lessons, and grading rubrics for a course in writing. Instruction includes strategies for creative writing classes as well as English composition courses, including a guided discussion on pedagogy theory and practice with daily questions on points of interest, suggested readings, and the opportunity for teaching writers to discuss challenges and insights for the practice of teaching. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 608 CRAFT AND PRACTICE I

Focus on skill-building in fundamental areas of narrative fiction. Students develop skills of observation and reflection in order to access material for their writing; strengthen research skills for their areas of interest; articulate their writing process and explore ways to make it more efficient and effective; practice craft-building exercises in a variety of areas. Participants encouraged to use class material as the basis for their future thesis work. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 609 GENRES I-SPECULATIVE FICTION, MYSTRY AND YOUNG ADULTS

Focus on providing students with experience writing in the speculative fiction genres, exploring the traditions and current trends in the market. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 612 NARRATIVE NONFICTION

Focus on introducing students to both long and short form of writing in narrative nonfiction, with writing practice in a variety of sub-categories. Students also build skills in utilizing nonfiction as it applies to their interest in fiction writing. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 618 GENRES II WOMEN'S FICTION, ROMANCE AND THE WESTERN

Focus on providing students with experience writing in the forms of the mystery, women's fiction, romance and the Western, exploring traditions and current trends in the market. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program.

CRWR 619 CRAFT AND PRACTICE II

A continuation and refinement of the narrative skill-building begun in CRWR 608, Craft and A continuation and refinement of the narrative skill-building begun in CRWR 606, Craft and Practice I. Students will be given exercises aimed at developing their thesis concepts into full-length works, examining the following: the structure of plot and subplot in their individual works, how to connect minor character motives to major character arcs, and inclusion of narrative elements and patterns to flesh out their current and future work. This will include practices designed to support the continuation of a literary life beyond the classroom environment, such as expansion of their "ideas" file, moves to overcome potential blocks, finding your public stance as a writer, and more. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 621 MAKING CONNECTIONS IN THE MARKET

Focus on a guided exploration of taking work into the world of making connections with editors, agents, and other writers through attending writing conventions, joining on-line groups, and more, preparing students to make the most of these channels for publication. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 622 THESIS PREPARATION

Focus on guiding students through the process of preparing and completing a working draft of the capstone thesis in a genre of the student's choice. Completed working draft to be submitted to the assigned thesis advisor no later than the course's end. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 631 SCANSION IMMERSION

Focus on an intensive review of prosody - how to make meter and rhythm work in the poetic line as well as how to discern that structure in the works of others. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 632 PUBLIC PERFORMANCE

Focus on the quintessence of public speaking, particularly as it applies to the performance of poetry, delivery of lectures, and participation in panels, understanding of the craft of using their voices and their physical presence to deliver creative, critical and pedagogical work orally to the public, and how to participate in conversations with the greatest possible skill and grace. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 633 POETRY AND MUSIC

Focus on exploring some of the complex relations between these two arts, from theoretical discussion to the practical aspects of writing everything from song lyrics to choral odes to opera libretti. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 636 METRICAL TRADITIONS AND VERSIFICATION I

Focus on tracing the development of the metrical tradition in English poetry from the beginning to the present. Students read poems in all the major forms (Anglo-Saxon Strong Stress Meter, the ballad, classical imitations, blank verse, the sonnet, iambic tetrameter, etc.) along with historical and theoretical commentary. Students also model such forms and scan their own work and that of others. Students will also trace the development of theories of versification and prosody in English. Students read a wide range of works, many of them by poets, in which they describe their craft and that of others, and they compare theories of and approaches to metrical poetry. In this course students are expected to produce a wide range of short essays on various traditions of versification, along with at least one substantial research paper. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 638 HISTORY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE/ POETRY TRANSLATIONS

Focus on a two-pronged study, first of the historical development and evolution of English, and second, work to understand translating poetry, studying and comparing translations, reading theories of translation and attempting translations. Prerequisites: Proof of second-year, or its equivalent, of reading competency in a foreign language, and admission to the program.

CRWR 641 METRICAL TRADITIONS & VERSIFICATION II

Focus on emphasizing advanced topics in metrical composition, e.g. stanza forms, longer forms and sequences, narrative forms, nonce forms (including free verse forms). Students not only practice the forms, but read and scan them along with delving into the history, criticism and theory. The course also selects several major traditions in verse theory and explores them in depth, e.g., linguistic theories of verse; structuralist theories; relations between verse and music; attempt to imitate classical forms in modern languages; etc. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 643 HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ENGLISH PROSODY

Focus on an exploration of the theory and practice of rhythm and rhyme, including all variations, their sources and their traditions in consideration of aesthetic, linguistic, and anthropological theories. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 646 NARRATIVE POETRY

Focus on examination, analysis, study, and writing in the narrative genres and modes of poetry, from the ballad to the epic and novel in verse. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 647 DRAMATC POETRY AND SATIRIC VERSE

Focus on examination, analysis, discussion, and writing in all the modes of comic verse, including all the modes of satire (Menippean, Horatian, parodic), to verse-based comic approaches such as light verse, doggerel, children's verse, and more. Additionally, an exploration of dramatic techniques of verse from ancient Greece through the Renaissance, and to modern writers such as T. S. Eliot and up to the present. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 651 ADVANCED STUDIES IN FORMS AND GENRES

Focus on a study of significant forms, group of forms, or poetic genres, based on student and faculty mentor interest, with students reading a wide range of examples along with criticism and theory, and also composing their own work in these forms and genres. Topics include the following: The Sonnet and Sonnet Sequences, French and Italian Forms (ballade, villanelle, sestina, rondeau, terza rima, etc.), Classical Forms (Latin and Greek), The Ode, Blank Verse, Elegy and Pastoral , Non-European Forms (haiku, ghazal, tanka, Welsh forms, etc.), Free Verse Forms (Whitmanian versicles, syllabics, loose iambics, nonce forms, etc.). Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 653 POETRY BOOK REVIEWING/ POETRY, LITERACY, PEDAGOGY

Focus on close analysis of the best reviews and criticism of the past and present, and practice writing such pieces themselves. Also a wide range of techniques and materials available to teachers of poetry to communicate much of that history. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 661 FILM HIST ANAL: VISUAL NARRTV

Focus on examination, analysis, and discussion of classic and contemporary films from a screenwriting, story, and character development perspective as well as analyses of theme and motif. Students engage in writing activities and exercises to develop a visual narrative style. All such writing goes towards creating material to fuel the mentoring process in upcoming semesters. The main theme here is: when possible show the story element; Don't have a character say it. Finally the prevailing three- and four-act screenplay structures will be explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 662 STORY, CONFLICT, CHARACTER, AND GENRE SCREENWRITING

Focus on work shopping of short screenplays and projects along with exploration of story arc, elements of conflict, character development and arc, with an emphasis on film genre choices and styles. Includes proposals for upcoming mentoring semesters, feature-length screenplays, plus an opportunity to practice pitches. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 663 SCREENWRITING COMPETITION, REPRESENTATION, THE "OPTION"

Mock or actual 'pitch' sessions of the thesis screenplay. Screenwriting contests researched and entered. Writers Guild guidelines and application explored. Agents, options to produce, and independent film potential also explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 665 SCREENWRITING GENRE

Focus on challenging students to write filmic stories in three distinct genre categories, forcing a growth and flexibility to create meaning across a spectrum of setting, time, and circumstance. Dialogue is permitted but is de-emphasized in favor of a more visual narrative. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 668 TELEVISON DRAMA AND SITUATION COMEDY

Focus on a thorough proposal for both the drama and sitcom is researched and written. The result will be a complete portfolio including an episode teleplay completed for (both or either) a television drama (and/or) a situation comedy. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 671 WRITING THE FIRST FULL-LENGTH SCREENPLAY

A thorough review of the existing works in the style and genre of the proposed piece, and a thorough treatment written. Students generate character biographies and a complete story outline. The production is 'pitched' to fellow students along with the mentor. A first draft written and critiqued. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 675 WRITING THE TV PILOT

Focus on choosing and writing an original TV pilot for either a one-hour drama series, or a half-hour sitcom. In addition to the pilot script, this course requires the students to pitch the idea, come up with marketing materials (i.e. treatment for the series, outline of the pilot, a series) and loglines for at least 4-5 future episodes. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 678 ADAPTATION

Focus on taking preexisting source material (books, newspaper articles, videogames, graphic novels etc.) and learn how to begin adapting such into a screenplay. Students examine various forms of adaptation, write a research paper, and write the first act of their own feature adaptation piece. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 684 TEACHING AND PEDAGOGY

A guided discussion on pedagogy theory and practice with weekly questions on points of interest, suggested readings, and the opportunity for writing teachers and aspiring writing teachers to discuss challenges and insights about the practice of teaching. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program.

CRWR 690 SCREENWRITING MASTER'S CAPSTONE PROJECT I

Focus on a feature-length screenplay, intended for Hollywood or independent production, proposed including a thorough review of the existing works, treatment, character biographies, and generation of a complete story outline. A first draft of approximately 120 pages written and critiqued. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 691 SCREENWRITING MASTER'S CAPSTONE PROJECT I

Focus on completion of the screenplay. Several drafts written and developed with the mentor. Following industry preferences, the screenplay should target approximately 100 pages. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 692 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Focus on working with a faculty mentor to research, develop, and structure a student's particular areas of interest into a written work. May be repeated for up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 694 CAPSTONE

Focus on working with a faculty mentor and responding to mentor readings and workshop suggestions in order to complete one long work suitable for thesis binding. For the Genres concentration, this shall be the final preparation of a work of fiction or narrative nonfiction suitable for seeking publication; or for the Poetry concentration, this shall be the final preparation to submit 35 pages of original poetry and a prose portfolio including at least one review of a poetry book and one historical essay, or else one review and one work of translation, totaling 10-15 pages, and an analytical project, for a total of 60 - 80 pages; or for the screenwriting concentration, this shall be the final preparation of a feature-length screenplay (the defined Master's Thesis Project) revised and polished, and readied for a public reading of an excerpt performed or else a self-produced sequence from, or trailer for, the screenplay. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

CRWR 697 SPECIAL TOPICS

Focus on studies of a particular topic of interest to students in the MFA program to be announced each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

ECON 201 MACROECONOMICS

An introduction to the methods, models, and approaches used by economists to analyze and interpret events and policies related to the overall operation of the economy. The course endeavors to make sense of unemployment, inflation, recessions, debt and deficits, economic growth, the expanding role of the Federal Reserve, and policies to provide stability to the economy. Additional attention is given to the making of economic policy in an era of globalization. Finally, students are exposed to multiple schools of thought regarding macroeconomic reasoning. Prerequisite: ACT math score of 19 or above; SAT math score of 460 or above; pass MATH 099; or Accuplacer Elementary Algebra test score of 85 or higher, or college-level math requirement with a minimum grade of "C-." Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 102.

ECON 202 MICROECONOMICS

The theory of microeconomics makes use of the tools of marginal cost-benefit analysis to provide a framework for the economic analysis of decision-making. The focus is on the choices of individual firms and consumers, and the resultant outcomes in individual markets. The social implications of the functioning of competitive markets are examined, as well as the causes of market failure and the potential roles of government in correcting them. Prerequisite: ACT math score of 19 or above; SAT math score of 460 or above; pass MATH 099; or Accuplacer Elementary Algebra test score of 85 or higher, or college-level math requirement with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 215 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

A presentation of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists to examine and assess environmental issues, conflicts, and policies. Students are asked to use market analysis, externality analysis, cost-benefit analysis, instrument choice models, and market and non-market valuation techniques to investigate issues such as air and water quality, global warming, toxic substances, wilderness designation, and sustainable development plans. Prerequisites: MATH 105, MATH, 131, MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 216 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

An introduction to descriptive statistics and statistical inference, with application in business, including hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and simple regression analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 301 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

An analysis of competing theories about the overall functioning of economies including both growth and stabilization policies. Alternative models are examined at the levels of assumptions, mechanics, dynamics, and policy implications. Theories are examined within their historical context and the sets of problems faced by the theorists. Students are asked to engage, analyze, interpret and provide a course of action for real-world cases. Prerequisites: ECON 201; ECON 202; and MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ECON 302 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

Intermediate Microeconomics extends the analysis of individual economic behavior and the functioning of markets learned in ECON 202 by incorporating the more sophisticated microeconomic models used in more advanced economic analysis. Topics include the theories of the consumer and the firm, the functioning of market, and the impact of market structure on price formation. Prerequisites: ECON 202; MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201 recommended.

ECON 303 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND GLOBALIZATION

An exploration of economic, political, and social effects of globalization. This is examined from the perspectives of trade, development, finance, and the environment. The first half of the course focuses on the impacts of international trade. This includes preferential trading relations, protectionism, global trade agreements, competitiveness, and possible conflicts between trade and social objectives. The second half of the course focuses on international monetary relations and regimes. This includes understanding the balance of payments, exchange rate determination, currency crises, and international debt. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201; ECON 202 recommended.

ECON 315 LABOR ECONOMICS

The central questions in the field of labor economics are how wages are determined, and why a market economy provides such a vast range of possible rewards to human labor. To answer them, this course examines the role of market forces (the supply of and demand for labor) as well as that of social, political, and economic institutions. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202; ECON 201 recommended.

ECON 316 ECONOMETRICS

The application of advanced statistical methods and modeling to an empirical understanding of economic issues. Combines elements of statistical reasoning with economic theory and provides an excellent opportunity to combine concepts learned in previous economics courses. Topics covered include multiple regression analysis, model specification, dummy variables, multi-collinearity heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, limited dependent variables, simultaneity, time series, forecasting, and methodological issues. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a 'C-' or better; ECON 201; ECON 202; and ECON 216 or MATH 213 with a 'C' or better.

ECON 317 ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC POLICY

An examination of the field of public economics, the branch of economics concerned with the reasons for market failure (monopoly, public goods, externalities, information asymmetry) and the potential for government policies to correct them. The application of the tools of economic analysis to understanding the causes of and potential solutions to social problems of current interest are emphasized. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202; ECON 201 recommended.

ECON 319 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION

A study of the branch of economics that analyzes the performance of industries in their role as producers of goods and services. Provides tools for analyzing and evaluating interactions between market structure (the number and size of firms in an industry), firm conduct, and industry performance. The role of government, through antitrust and other regulation, in improving the efficiency of industries and thus the economic system as a whole, is also considered. In addition, the theoretical tools of industrial analysis are used to perform case studies of actual industries. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202.

ECON 350 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

An examination of the development of economic thought and economic methodology from the pre-capitalist era to the present, with emphasis on placing the development of economic theory into its historical and political context. Major topics include the early classical school (Smith, Ricardo, Marx), the rise of modern neoclassical economics, and critical responses to mainstream theory. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201; and ECON 202.

ECON 361 MONEY, BANKING, AND FINANCIAL MARKETS

A survey of the core topics relating to the monetary sector of the economy. This includes an examination of the role and nature of money, financial institutions and markets, banking structure and regulation, determinants of interest rates, central bank policy, exchange rates, and the international monetary system. Attention is also given to particular monetary episodes such as the Great Depression, the Latin American debt crisis, the collapse of the Mexican Peso, and the Asian monetary collapse. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 201.

ECON 370 NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS

A study of the efficient and equitable use of society's scarce natural resources. This course discusses the application of economic theory to natural resource problems, such as externalities and resource extraction. Particular attention will be placed on Western United States issues, including water, energy, mineral extraction, forestry and public land use. Prerequisites: MATH 140, MATH 141, or MATH 151 with a minimum grade of "C-"; ECON 202 or ECON 215.

ECON 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Prerequisite: overall GPA of 2.500 or higher, or department chair permission.

ECON 476 AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

An inquiry into sources and character of American economic development. A survey is provided of several key moments in American political economy such as the market revolution, reconstruction, populism, progressivism, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and globalization. Students are asked to engage the ideas, social movements, and institutions that have shaped the modern American economy. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

ECON 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: overall GPA of 2.500 or higher, or department chair permission.

ECON 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Prerequisite: overall GPA of 2.500 or higher, or department chair permission.

ECON 498 INCOME DISTRIBUTION, POVERTY AND WEALTH

A seminar-style examination of the causes and consequences of historical trends in income and wealth distribution in the United States, concentrating especially on the trend toward increasing inequality that began in the 1970s. Topics include: empirical analysis of distributional data; causal analysis based on both microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis; the roles of institutional change, social attitudes, and government policy; and both positive and normative evaluations of the economic and social consequences. This course fulfills the Economics Capstone Requirement.

ECON 499 INTERNSHIP

The Economics Internship gives Economics majors who have completed 18 credits of economics the opportunity to apply their analytical skills in the service of businesses, government, and the community. Prerequisite: 18 credits of Economics courses including ECON 201; ECON 202; ECON 216 or MATH 213; and instructor permission.

EDUC 0 EDUCATION GATEWAY COURSE

Students explore the professional opportunities and practices of the teaching discipline. Designed to provide participants a variety of designated experiences with K-12 students so they are able to make informed decisions about becoming teachers. Students facilitate field experiences with school-age students both at the elementary and secondary levels. Students attend two one-hour long seminars and participate in 10 hours of subsequent field experiences. This course is required for admission to the Teacher Education Program. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

EDUC 102 ISSUES AND TRENDS IN AMERICAN EDUCATION

An introduction to the philosophical and historical foundations of American public education, as well as current conceptions of and issues facing the teaching profession. Students reflect upon their own experiences in K-12 schools, explore current trends in teaching and learning, and investigate socio-political and economic issues facing 21st Century American education.

EDUC 316 INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE ACQUISITION FOR LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS

An introduction to theory and understanding of first and second language acquisition for teaching K-12 students from linguistically diverse cultures and backgrounds. Students develop an awareness of the historical, legal, social and educational background surrounding linguistically diverse education. The primary focus is on research based oral language assessment and development to provide meaningful instruction. Methods include those appropriate for the beginning English language learner, as well as those at other levels on the language acquisition continuum. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 340 BRAIN BASED LEARNING MOTIVATION ACHIEVEMENT

A foundation course in key aspects of schooling such as legal, assessment, diverse student needs, current brain research, and literacy. A practical application of cognitive processes and brain research is used. Course includes an integrated variety of approaches to teaching and learning, including cooperative learning, differentiated instruction, research-based strategies, skills for success in writing, technology integration, structuring schools and learning to ensure accountability for results. Prerequisite: passing scores on Basic Skills Competency Exam in Mathematics, Reading, and Writing; completion of EDUC 000, including ten hours of field experiences; no more than two semesters prior to internship.

EDUC 392 Independent Study

A course for qualified, upper-level students with specialized interests in a particular area of advanced study in Teacher Education. 

EDUC 392 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A course for qualified, upper-level students with specialized interests in a particular area of advanced study in Teacher Education.

EDUC 400 FOUNDATIONS FOR LITERACY: PHONOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS

A study and application of scientifically-based methods of teaching and reinforcing fundamental reading skills. Cognitive processes of literacy, including phonology, morphology, orthography and etymology. Focus placed on English language structure as it affects decoding and encoding. Additionally, methods for diverse groups of students, including students with disabilities, students from culturally and linguistically diverse populations, and high-achieving students are covered. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 401 ASSESSMENT FOR PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION

This is an in-depth application of assessment techniques and instruments in coordination with state standards, No Child Left Behind and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2004. Includes standardized testing and knowledge of literacy including five essential components of reading: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension. Analysis of data to design and monitor instruction and intervention for universal, targeted, and intensive needs of diverse groups of students, including students with disabilities, students from culturally and linguistically diverse populations, and high-achieving students. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 402 READING COMPREHENSION, VOCABULARY, AND FLUENCY

A study and application of scientifically-based methods of teaching and reinforcing reading comprehension, vocabulary fluency, oral and written language skills. Cognitive processes of literacy, including phonology, morphology, orthography, etymology, semantics, syntax, discourse, pragmatics and English language structure as it affects meaning. Additionally, methods for diverse groups of students, including students with disabilities, students from culturally and linguistically diverse populations, and high-achieving students are covered. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 403 INSTRUCTION ASSESSMENT IN CONTENT AREA

An introduction to the concepts, methods, techniques, and assessment practices used to effectively teach secondary and K-12 students. Emphasis is placed on structures for lesson and unit planning, implementation of the Colorado State Standards, literacy and math integration, research based instructional strategies, content specific technologies, and management techniques. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 404 CREATING POSITIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

A foundation course to prepare students to create appropriate learning environments both inside and outside the classroom. Students learn effective lesson planning, classroom management, medical protocol and sound legal disciplinary practices that are characterized by acceptable student behavior and efficient use of time. The students learn to perpetuate the democratic system by understanding the relationships among the various governmental entities that create laws, rules, regulations and policies. Students apply educational practices to ensure safe and orderly schools. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 405 DATA DRIVEN INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES

An in-depth application of standards based instruction and assessment practices. Students design curriculum maps and plan short and long range standards-based lessons and units for diverse student populations based on their respective content areas. Students are taught to integrate literacy, math, and technology into their standards-based instructional plans encompasses the development and utilization of various types of curriculum based measures both formal and informal in order to accurately document and report ongoing student achievement. Students learn to use assessment data to drive standards-based curriculum that measure student knowledge, understanding, and skills. Technology is utilized to manage and communicate assessment results and their implications to students, parents, professionals, administrators and the community. At the end of this course, students reflect and evaluate their own performance, and articulate that teaching is a worthy career. Prerequisite: admission to t

EDUC 406 CONTENT AREA LITERACY

An application of current research on brain based learning, reading and writing and its integration in the content area. Students implement the essential components of reading: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, motivation, and engagement within the content area. In addition, there is a focus on content area study and test taking skills. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 407 MAXIMIZING LEARNING THROUGH 21ST CENTURY SKILLS

Foster a deeper understanding of the 21st Century environment schools need to cultivate in order to maximize learning. This course prepares teachers to create technology-rich learning environments that enhance student growth and achievement. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 407 Maximizing Learning Through 21st Century Skills

An inquiry into the 21st century environment schools need to cultivate in order to maximize
learning. This course prepares teachers to create technology-rich learning environment that
enhance student growth and achievement. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education
Program.

EDUC 408 TEACHING WRITING WITH THE BRAIN IN MIND

An in-depth application of cognitive processes associated with various kinds of learning. Within the context of writing assessment and instruction, students learn to pay attention to these learning processes so that their own classroom students can master content standards. Students learn to employ a wide range of teaching techniques to match the intellectual, emotional and social level of each classroom student and choose alternative teaching strategies, materials and technologies to achieve different curricular purposes. Students apply expert content knowledge to enrich and extend student learning and to recognize educational diversity and the effects on student learning in order to develop and apply individual educational plans. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 408 TEACHING AND WRITING WITH THE BRAIN IN MIND

An application of cognitive processes associated with various kinds of learning. Within the context of writing assessment and instruction, students learn to employ a wide range of teaching techniques to match the intellectual, emotional and social level of each classroom student. Students apply expert content knowledge to enrich and extend student learning and apply individual educational plans. Prerequisite: admission to the Education Department's residency year.

EDUC 409 SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING

Student teaching in a 7-12 school setting on the average of 24 hours per week, over the course of the academic year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course must be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 410 K-12 STUDENT TEACHING

Student teaching in a K-12 school setting on the average of 24 hours per week, over the course of the academic year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course must be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 413 Mathematical Investigations

An application of the research-based practices for instruction in math. Focus is placed on the foundations for assessing and teaching math by addressing basic skills, critical thinking skills, conceptual understanding, real life applications, and diverse learner needs. Students implement and review specific assessment practices, teaching structures, intervention strategies, and technology applications within a standardsbased framework of instruction. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 413 MATHEMATICAL INVESTIGATIONS

An application of the research-based practices for instruction in math. Focus is placed on the foundations for assessing and teaching math by addressing basic skills, critical thinking skills, conceptual understanding, real life applications, and diverse learner needs. Students implement and review specific assessment practices, teaching structures, intervention strategies, and technology applications within a standards- based framework of instruction. Prerequisite: admission to the Education Department.

EDUC 417 TEACHING ASSESSING WRITING WITH THE LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENT IN MIND

A comprehensive study of theory and understanding of first and second language acquisition for teaching K-12 students from linguistically diverse cultures and backgrounds. Students develop an awareness of the historical, legal, social and educational background surrounding linguistically diverse education. The primary focus is on research based oral language assessment and development to provide meaningful instruction. Methods include those appropriate for the beginning English language learner as well as those at other levels on the language acquisition continuum. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 420 Application of Classroom Strategies to Engage All Learners

Study and apply effective research-based strategies for high levels of attention and

engagement for all learners. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education

Program.

EDUC 420 APPLICATION OF CLASSROOM STRATEGIES TO ENGAGE ALL LEARNERS

Study and apply effective research- based strategies for high levels of attention and engagement for all learners. Prerequisite: Admission in Teacher Education.

EDUC 459 ELEMENTARY CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENT TEACHING

Student teaching in an elementary school setting, with special attention given to work with linguistically diverse students. The student teaching experience averages 24 hours per week over the course of the academic year and is supervised by a mentor teacher. May repeat twice for credit. Prerequisite: admission to licensure program.

EDUC 492 Independent Study

A course for qualified, upper-level students with specialized interests in a particular area of advanced study in Teacher Education. 

EDUC 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY

A course for qualified, upper-level students with specialized interests in a particular area of advanced study in Teacher Education.

EDUC 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics

EDUC 535 ENGAGING THE K-12 ONLINE LEARNER

A study of methods and strategies to engage the online K-12 learner. Educators study how to transition from traditional face-to-face classrooms to online settings. Focus is primarily on the key principles of effective online instruction and the power of the learner-centered approach to ensure success for the online teacher and learner. Prerequisite: Teaching license.

EDUC 536 ASSESSING K-12 ONLINE LEARNER

A study of methods and strategies to engage the online K-12 learner. Educators study the principles of effective online assessment and specific online tools and strategies. Focus is on using assessment results to differentiate instruction and support the K-12 online learner. Prerequisite: Teaching license and EDUC 535.

EDUC 537 FIELD BASED APPLICATION OF ONLINE INSTRUCTION

Application of effective online teaching to an appropriate K-12 student population. Prerequisite: Teaching license and EDUC 535 and EDUC 536.

EDUC 597 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics

EDUC 600 FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY DEVELOPMENT

Provide in-depth understanding of the reading acquisition process and current issues in reading research related to preliterate and emergent readers through observation and analysis of reading and written language development. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 601 METHODS AND STRATEGIES OF EFFECTIVE READING INSTRUCTION

Provide in-depth understanding and application of scientifically-based methods of teaching reading comprehension vocabulary, and fluency. Prerequisite: Admission to

EDUC 601 Methods and Strategies for Effective Reading Instruction

Provide in-depth understanding and application of scientifically-based methods of teaching reading comprehension vocabulary, and fluency.

EDUC 602 LITERACY ASSESSMENT INFORMED INSTRUCTION

M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 602 LITERACY ASSESSMENT INFORMED INSTRUCTION

Screen, diagnose, and monitor student progress in reading and writing to inform instruction and build home-school partnerships that promote reading and writing. 

EDUC 603 CONTENT AREA LEARNING

Apply concepts, methods, and practices related to curriculum, assessment of learning, and teaching in content areas. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 604 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

Recognize needs for a successful classroom environment and apply strategies to support learning. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 605 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Study and apply standards-based curriculum and assessment practices. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 606 READING IN THE CONTENT AREA

Analyze, evaluate, and apply methods for developing effective reading strategies that improve student academic achievement in the content area. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 607 RETHINKING LEARNING THROUGH 21ST CENTURY SKILLS

Investigate the research and theory of 21st Century Skills as they affect the education program. Develop effective teaching strategies through theory and simulation. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 607 Enhancing Student Learning with Digital Technology

Investigate the research and theory of 21st Century Skills as they affect the education program. Develop effective teaching strategies through theory and simulation.

Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 608 METHODS AND STRATEGIES OF EFFECTIVE WRITING INSTRUCTION

Provide in-depth understanding and application of research based methods of teaching writing as they apply to cognitive processes and socio-cultural context for diverse students. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 609 SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING

Work in a secondary school setting over the course of the year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 610 K-12 STUDENT TEACHING

Work in a K-12 school setting over the course of the year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 610 K-12 Student Teaching

Work in a K-12 school setting over the course of the year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 611 STRATEGIES & TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SUPPORT NEEDS

Address critical issues, content, and pedagogy needed by special education professionals. Apply these theories to the daily activities of the teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 612 BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION

Use critical thinking and problem solving skills to study and apply current behavioral research and school law regarding the education of students with emotional/behavioral disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 613 Methods and Strategies of Effective Mathematics Instruction

Examine and apply research-based teaching strategies that promote mathematics learning. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 613 METHODS AND STRATEGIES OF EFFECTIVE MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION

Examine and apply research-based teaching strategies that promote mathematics learning. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 614 Collaborating for Students with Support Needs

Use data and collaboration process to develop Individual Educational Plans, and provide support needs and technologies for students with disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 614 COLLABORATORYORATORYRATING FOR STUDENTS WITH SUPPORT NEEDS

Use data and collaboration process to develop Individual Educational Plans, and provide support needs and technologies for students with disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 615 SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENT TEACHING

Work in a K-12 school setting with students with disabilities over the course of the year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 616 LANGUAGE ACQUSTION FOR LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS

Develop and apply understanding of language acquisition and awareness of the historical, legal, social and educational background surrounding linguistically diverse education. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 617 COGNITIVE ACADEMIC LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY IN CONTENT AREA

Differentiate social and cognitive academic language and use research to develop cognitive academic language for English Language Learners. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 617 Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency in the Content Area

Differentiate social and cognitive academic language and use research to develop cognitive academic language for English Language Learners. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 618 LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENT TEACHING

Work in a K-12 school setting with linguistically diverse students over the course of the year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 619 ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING

Work in an elementary school setting over the course of the year, in collaboration with mentor teachers. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 620 ENGAGING DIVERSE LEANERS

A study and application of research-based instruction to engage diverse learners. Focus is on creating learning experiences to maximize student engagement and achievement, while evaluating and reflecting on teaching practice. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 622 Using Data to Plan for Online Learning and Targeted 3 credits Interventions

An analysis and application of collecting and using multiple levels of data to inform instruction relevant to the online and blended environment for K-12 students.  Blended and online instructional approaches will be modified and improved based upon Universal Design for Learning principles, awareness of the needs of diverse learners, and the data collected from the students, educators, and district. Prerequisite: Admissions to M.A. degree in Education Program, EDUC 621.

EDUC 623 Designing and Delivering Effective Online Instruction

Online field-based experience in design, delivery, and evaluation of standards-based instruction in an appropriate K-12 setting. A collaborative approach will be fostered among students, teachers, and school-level administrators to support existing or emerging online or blended instructional needs. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program, EDUC 621 & 622.

EDUC 670 INTRODUCTION TO SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

Provide an overview of educational leadership principles, including theories of leadership, foundational concepts of leading a school, qualities of effective leaders, and the process of building a positive, collaborative school culture. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 672 PERSONEL SELECTION AND DEVELOPMENT

Understand and evaluate the process of working with school-related personnel, including recruiting and hiring practices, developing meaningful induction and mentoring programs, managing teacher and staff evaluations, and providing needs-based professional development for all staff. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 673 SCHOOL SAFTY AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Identify and explore the components of school plant and safety management, including school-wide student discipline policies and practices, crisis and emergency planning and responses, and managing various funding sources associated with operating a school. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 674 Parent and Community Involvement

Investigate various strategies for building relationships with all members of the school community, including identifying and understanding diversity in the surrounding community, establishing partnerships with area businesses and organizations, and working effectively with local media outlets

EDUC 674 PARENT AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Investigate various strategies for building relationships with all members of the school community, including identifying and understanding diversity in the surrounding community, establishing partnerships with area businesses and organizations, and working effectively with local media outlets. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 675 School Accountability and Evaluation

Examine the responsibilities of managing curriculum, instruction, and assessment in schools, including selection of curricular materials that maximize learning for all students, use of data from local and statewide assessments to drive instructional decisions, and development of strategies and schedules that target students’ individual needs. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 675 STUDENT ACCOUNTABILITY AND EVALUATION

Examine the responsibilities of managing curriculum, instruction, and assessment in schools, including selection of curricular materials that maximize learning for all students, use of data from local and statewide assessments to drive instructional decisions, and development of strategies and schedules that target students' individual needs. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 678 Administrator Internship

Complete a supervised internship or work full/part time as a school-based administrator for an entire school year during the principal licensure year of the Educational Administrator Leadership Program. 

EDUC 678 ADMINISTRATOR INTERNSHIP

Complete a supervised internship or work full/part time as a school-based administrator for an entire school year during the principal licensure year of the Educational Administrator Leadership Program. This course must be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 679 PRINCIPAL LICENSURE CAPSTONE

Complete a supervised internship or work full/part time as a school-based administrator for an entire school year during the principal licensure year of the Educational Administrator Leadership Program. This course must be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 679 Principal Licensure Capstone

Develop a comprehensive, professional work sample demonstrating proficiency of the Colorado Principal Licensure Standards.

EDUC 680 RESEARCH AND CRITICAL INQUIRY FOR LEADERS

Examine, analyze, and synthesize research literature in relation to emerging trends in education. Explore concepts pertaining to quantitative and qualitative research methods and the synergistic relationship between research, theory, and practice. Develop problem posing/solving, information literacy, and critical thinking. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program. Must be taken in the final year of the program.

EDUC 681 CURRICULAR COLLABORATORYORATORYRATION IN SCHOOL SITES

Investigates best practice in curriculum reform, decision making, collaboration, and evaluation strategies as they affect the educational program. Develop problem solving skills through theory simulation. Prerequisite: Admissions to M.A. degree in Educational Program.

EDUC 682 LEADERSHIP IN SCHOOL SITES

Explore leadership models and issues related to communication, collaboration and cultural dynamics in a changing school climate. Professional literature is related to students' own practical experience, through observations, reflections and analyses. This course examines and applies skills related to educational leadership that advocate for all students and all stakeholders in the K-12 educational process and facilitate change. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. Degree in Education Program.

EDUC 683 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION

Explore legal and ethical issues related to equity, diversity, and accessibility in schools, including examining cases and case law affecting school-based practices, identifying the legal and ethical responsibilities of school employees, and understanding the rights and responsibilities of the members in the school community. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 683 School Law

Examine laws and legal implications of court decisions affecting schools and professional educators.

EDUC 684 MATERIALS AND MOTIVATION FOR READING

Select and evaluate materials, develop independent readers, involve the community, and establish and manage the literacy environment. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 684 Materials and Motivation for Reading

Select and evaluate materials, develop independent readers, involve the community, and establish and manage the literacy environment.

EDUC 685 ASSESSING, EVALUATING, INSTRUCTING AT-RISK AND STRUGGLING READERS

Develop in-depth understanding of scientifically based reading research and instruction for at risk and struggling readers. Provide the tools necessary to diagnose, evaluate and teach struggling readers. Assignments will include the development of intervention programs and the implementation of progress-monitoring reading assessments. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 685 Assessing, Evaluating & Instructing At-Risk & Struggling Readers

Develop in-depth understanding of scientifically based reading research and instruction for at risk and struggling readers. Provide the tools necessary to diagnose, evaluate and teach struggling readers. Assignments will include the development of intervention programs and the implementation of progress-monitoring reading assessments

EDUC 686 LITERACY COACHING AND MENTORING

Examine roles and functions of literacy coaching and mentoring to provide professional development for literacy in the school setting. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 687 School-wide Comprehensive Literacy Program Development

Prepare educators for school-wide comprehensive literacy program development and delivery.

EDUC 688 Reading Teacher Internship

Complete supervised practicum(s) or internship(s) as a reading teacher at the appropriate grade level(s) for Colorado Department of Education Reading Teacher graduate endorsement. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 688 READING TEACHER INTERNSHIP

Complete supervised practicum(s) or internship(s) as a reading teacher at the appropriate grade level(s) for Colorado Department of Education Reading Teacher graduate endorsement. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 689 Reading Specialist Internship

Complete supervised practicum(s) or internship(s) as a reading specialist at the appropriate grade level(s) for Colorado Department of Education Reading Specialist graduate endorsement. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 689 READING SPECIALIST INTERNSHIP

Complete supervised practicum(s) or internship(s) as a reading specialist at the appropriate grade level(s) for Colorado Department of Education Reading Specialist graduate endorsement. This course can be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 690 School Law for Site Leaders Seminar

Relate knowledge of educational legal issues and trends through study of case law as it relates to the respective school site. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 690 SCHOOL LAW FOR SITE LEADERS SEMINAR

Relate knowledge of educational legal issues and trends through study of case law as it relates to the respective school site. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 691 FOSTERING COLLABORATORYORATORYRATIVE SCHOOL SITES

Examine collaborative processes, models of collaboration, and communication skills that promote effective professional interaction and decision making in educational settings. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 691 Fostering Collaborative School Sites

Examine collaborative processes, models of collaboration, and communication skills that promote effective professional interaction and decision making in educational settings.  Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 692 Issues and Trends in Leadership Seminar

The role of professional literature and experience in the development of leadership capacity that advocates for   improvements of education.   Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 692 ISSUES AND TRENDS IN LEADERRSHIP SEMINAR

The role of professional literature and experience in the development of leadership capacity that advocates for improvements of education. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 693 CAPSTONE

Interpreting, planning, conducting, and reporting research results in the field of education. Students must be enrolled in EDUC 693 when utilizing Western State College of Colorado Graduate Faculty support in conducting research. This course can be repeated for credit and is required the final semester of the M.A. degree in Education Program. Prerequisite: EDUC 680 Research and Critical Inquiry for leaders.

EDUC 693 Capstone

Interpreting, planning, conducting, and reporting research results in the field of education. The student must be enrolled in EDUC 693 when utilizing Western State College of Colorado Graduate Faculty support in conducting research. This course can be repeated for credit and is required the final semester of the M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 697 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION

Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 698 Independent Study

Work individually with a professor to design and complete a self-paced course of study.

EDUC 698 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Work individually with a professor to design and complete a self-paced course of study. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

EDUC 699 RESEARCH PROBLEMS

Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. degree in Education Program.

ENG 99 BASIC WRITING

Provides students with practice in generating and developing writing about academic topics and preparation for ENG 102 Academic Writing. For students who do not meet the College Level Entry Standards set by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Credit does not count toward graduation. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

ENG 100 SUPPLEMENTAL ACADEMIC WRITING

Provides co-requisite, supplemental instruction for students enrolled in ENG 102. Students will practice employing rhetorical knowledge; using writing processes; developing critical reading and writing strategies; and using effective written communication to demonstrate comprehension of content knowledge. Prerequisites: an assessment equivalent to ACT English score between 15-17 and ACTR score between 14-16; a SAT Writing score between 380-429; or an Accuplacer Reading score between 53-79 and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score between 66-95; or a Compass Writing Skills score of 49-73; and a high school GPA of 2.75 or higher. Co-requisite ENG 102. Note: this course is intended for those qualified students wanting to complete the Supplemental Academic Instruction (SAI) program in English.

ENG 102 ACADEMIC WRITING

Provides students the opportunity to practice strategies for developing writing projects on unfamiliar topics in unfamiliar formats to become more effective and efficient writers. Writers learn to practice strategies for making writing more comprehensible for readers and to use a wide range of writing processes for getting started, developing, organizing, and polishing writing projects. Prerequisites (one of the following): ENG 099; ACT English score of 18 or higher to demonstrate writing proficiency and ACT Reading score of 17 or higher to demonstrate reading proficiency; SAT Critical Reading score of 440 or higher to demonstrate writing proficiency and SAT Critical Reading score of 430 or above to demonstrate reading proficiency; Accuplacer Sentence Skills test score of 95 or higher and Accuplacer Reading Comprehension test score of 80 or higher; or combination of ACT, SAT, and Accuplacer scores to fulfill both reading and writing proficiencies; or co-requisite ENG 100 (SAI).

ENG 150 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

An introduction to literature with focus on a specific theme, form, or topic. Prerequisites (one of the following): ENG 099; ACT English score of 18 or higher to demonstrate writing proficiency and ACT reading score of 17 or higher to demonstrate reading proficiency; SAT Critical Reading score of 440 or higher to demonstrate writing proficiency and SAT Critical Reading score of 430 or above to demonstrate reading proficiency; Accuplacer Sentence skills test score of 95 or higher and Accuplacer Reading Comprehension test score of 80 or higher; or combination of ACT, SAT and Accuplacer scores to fulfill both reading and writing proficiencies; open only to first- and second-year students who have completed fewer than 60 credits.

ENG 197 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics

ENG 205 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

An introduction to the basic techniques of writing fiction and poetry. Models of each are studied, and students write and share pieces in both of these literary forms. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-".

ENG 220 GRAMMAR AND THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

A study of English grammar focusing on standard English. Students are also introduced to the history of the English language. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 230 ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE: STUDIES IN -

A study of environmental literature. Students analyze the formal and thematic characteristics of the literature. To inform critical interpretations, students read relevant cultural and environmental theory. The theme or topic is announced each semester. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 232 BORDERLANDS: RACE CLASS GENDER

A focus on multicultural literature representing literal and metaphoric borders and crossings. Students examine how culture and ideology inform representations of the interconnections among race, class, and gender. Examples include literatures of migration, mixed identities, and racial and gender crossings. Prerequisite: ENG 102with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 237 WOMEN AND LITERATURE

Critical study of selected topics, themes, or issues about women as they are interpreted in popular and classic literary works. Specific titles to be announced each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-".

ENG 238 LITERARY CULTURE OF THE AMERICAN WEST

A study of traditional and nontraditional forms of Western literature. Specific titles to be announced each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 240 WRITING CENTER WORKSHOP

Students investigate methods of the writing process and study personal communications of tutoring. Strategies include studying the learning styles of all students. Prerequisite: instructor permission.

ENG 248 FILM AS LITERATURE/LITERATURE AS FILM

A focus on the development of film and its cultural impact, with special emphasis on the relationship between film as a visual medium and literature as a verbal medium. After examining a selection of short stories and novels and the film adaptations based upon them, students are given the opportunity to write some film criticism of their own. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 250 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE

Students study a variety of genres as a basis of learning to write literary analysis. Focus is on an understanding of the varied perspectives from which a text can be approached, and how readers construct meaning based not only upon the text itself, but also the context in which it is studied. The critical approach as well as theme or topic may vary. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 254 POPULAR GENRE FICTION

A focus on works that adhere to a specific popular genre announced on a rotating basis and selected from such sub-genres as science fiction, fantasy, mysteries, romance, westerns, or horror. Readings explore the relationship of genre tropes to the craft of storytelling. Course may be repeated for credit when taken with a different emphasis. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 255 ANCIENT WORLD LITERATURE GAH3

A study of ancient texts and their relation to their own time, and to ours. Since an understanding of these writings is important for reading English literature, the focus of the course is on Western texts central to that tradition. However, students may also read selected works from non-Western cultures in order to give them a taste of the diversity of the ancient world. Works studied may include selections from the Bible (Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament), Homer's writings, poetry and theatre of Classical Greece, Chinese poetry from the Book of Songs, a selection from the Mahabharata, and Roman poetry, particularly Virgil and Ovid. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 270 FOLKLORE

A study of one or more areas of folklore with a focus on American folklore. Possible areas include folksong, folk tales and legends, customs and festivals, dance and drama, proverbs, traditions, beliefs, recipes, and games. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of "C-."

ENG 297 SPECIAL TOPICS

A study of a particular topic of interest to students of English to be announced each time the course is offered.

ENG 300 CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION

Models are studied, and students read and respond to one another's writing. This course may incorporate narrative theory. Prerequisite: ENG 205 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 301 CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY

Instruction is given on the techniques and terminology of poetry writing. Models are studied, and students read and respond to one another's writing. Prerequisite: ENG 205 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 303 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING

A workshop approach to help writers develop a portfolio of essays suitable for publication in outdoor, environmental, and other appropriate magazines. To enhance their essays, writers read and analyze theoretical and published environmental texts. Prerequisite: ENG 205 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 305 CREATIVE WRITING: NON-FICTION

Models are studied, and students read and respond to one another's writing. Prerequisite: ENG 205 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 331 LITERATURE AND ETHNICITY: STUDIES IN

A focus on United States literatures reflective of specific identities and cultures. Students examine format and thematic characteristics of a particular literature. To enhance critical understanding, students read and analyze relevant theoretical approaches to race, ethnicity, and culture. A specific focus is announced each time the course is taught. Examples include Native American, African American, and Borderlands literature. Course may be repeated once for credit with a different title, but may be counted only once toward the major. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 334 POETRY: STUDIES IN

An in-depth study of poetry as a genre through selections of British, American, and world literature. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 335 DRAMA: STUDIES IN

An in-depth study of drama as a genre through selections of British, American, and world literature. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 336 PROSE: STUDIES IN

A focus on prose fiction, including such genres as short stories, novellas, and novels. Depending upon the instructor's specific emphasis, examples of any one or more of these genres may be selected for the term. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 337 WOMEN WRITERS

Analysis of the poetry, drama, or fiction of women writers. Emphasis is on 19th century, 20th century, or contemporary writers. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 352 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

A survey of traditional and modern literature providing an opportunity to discuss topics such as reader-response theories, critical literacy, objective and subjective criticism, censorship, and the use misuse of literature in primary and middle-level education.

ENG 358 GLOBAL LITERATURES: STUDIES IN

A study of literatures from around the globe that considers the artistry, culture, and diverse social conditions of various countries. A specific focus is announced each time the course is offered. Possible topics may include "Colonialism and Globalization," "The Sacred Texts," and "War and Revolution." Course may be repeated once for credit with a different title, but may be counted only once toward the major. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 370 MYTH AND CULTURE

An introduction to the role of myth in literature and in our contemporary world. Examining myth from various perspectives, including the archetypal, the course focuses upon myth as a means for understanding aspects of our society's cultures. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 371 LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM

An introduction to some of the primary conversations structuring debates in literary theory and criticism. Students learn to identify central questions, assumptions, and conflicts in theoretical and critical texts. Students also gain an understanding of the ways that theory and criticism influence their immediate experiences in English courses. Prerequisites: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C" and at least one 300-level literature course, or instructor permission.

ENG 372 BRITISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE TEXTS

A study of British Literature focusing on the major genres for the Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, and Renaissance periods, ending with the Metaphysical poets (800 A.D. to early 1600s). Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 373 BRITISH LITERATURE: MILTON THROUGH THE ROMANTICS

A study of British works of poetry, fiction, drama, and essay produced from 1660 to1830. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 374 BRITISH LITERATURE: THE VICTORIAN TO PRESENT DAY

A study of British works of poetry, fiction, drama, and essay produced from 1830 to the present day. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 384 AMERICAN LITERATURE-EARLY-CIVIL WAR

An exploration of authors and texts in American literature up to 1865. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 385 AMERICAN LITERATURE-CIVIL WAR-PRESENT

An exploration of authors and texts in American literature from 1865 to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 394 JUNIOR SEMINAR: STUDIES IN:

Students comprehensively engage a given topic and the critical conversations pertaining to it. The research component of the course allows students to participate in and extend scholarly dialogue. A specific focus is announced each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C" and ENG 371.

ENG 396 WRITING CENTER ASSISTANTSHIP

Students apply knowledge obtained in ENG 240 in directed field experiences in Writing Center tutoring. Prerequisite: ENG 240.

ENG 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics

ENG 405 ADVANCED WRITING

An opportunity to deepen writing practiced at the junior level, with increased attention to voice and style. This course seeks to develop an awareness of the broader community of writers that includes those with not only similar but also differing writing goals. Prerequisites: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C" and at least two 300-level writing courses.

ENG 445 LITERARY MAGAZINE SUBMISSION AND PRODUCTION

Focus alternates between literary magazine submissions and literary magazine production. Submission discussion includes aesthetics and techniques for revising and polishing work for submission. During the production focus students participate in the editorial production of a fiction anthology including acquisition and proofreading of manuscripts. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C"; ENG 300, ENG 301, ENG 303, or ENG 305 with a minimum grade of "C"; or instructor permission.

ENG 463 MAJOR BRITISH AUTHORS:

An in-depth study of selected, significant authors that approaches works from similar or cross-historical periods of British literature. Course may be repeated once for credit when taken with a different emphasis. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C" and junior standing.

ENG 464 MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHORS

An in-depth study of selected, significant authors that approaches works from similar or cross-historical periods of American literature. Course may be repeated once for credit when taken with a different emphasis. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 475 THEORIES READING WRITING DISCOURSE

An in-depth study of selected, significant authors that approaches works from similar or cross-historical periods of American literature. Course may be repeated once for credit when taken with a different emphasis. Prerequisites: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of ¿C¿ and minimum junior standing.

ENG 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY-ENGLISH

An opportunity for individual study about topics in English, to be selected by the students, in cooperation with their advisors and with the permission of the regular faculty member supervising the study. May be taken for a maximum of three credits in one semester. Maximum credit toward the English major is six credits. Prerequisites: 12 credits of English; ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 494 SENIOR SEMINAR: STUDIES IN:

The Senior Seminar serves as the Standard Major's capstone experience and focuses on announced thematic topics that allow students to demonstrate competencies developed in the major. The theme or topic is announced for each spring. Prerequisite: senior standing.

ENG 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

A study of a particular topic of interest to students of English to be announced each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: ENG 250 with a minimum grade of "C."

ENVS 100 INTRO TO ENVIORNMENT SUSTAINBILITY

An interdisciplinary, historical analysis of the development of environmental problems, movements, and philosophies. Students apply historical lessons to critically examine sustainable solutions locally and globally.

ENVS 200 WRITING THE ENVIRONMENT

Students develop communication skills through presentations and writing on a variety of environmental issues appropriate to a wide variety of audiences. Through environmental essays, writing for nonprofit websites, grant proposals, and other forms of environmental writing, students are introduced to a broad range of skills needed for effective communication. Focus throughout the course on the analysis of arguments and texts further develops students' analytical and communication skills. Prerequisite: ENVS 100; COTH 202 is recommended.

ENVS 301 SCIENCE OF SUSTAINABILITY AND RESILIENCE

A holistic inquiry into how humans might live the next chapter of our history, guided by the ecological principles of sustainability and resilience. Environmental problems and their possible solutions are analyzed critically and quantitatively; field experiences on campus and in the community involve students directly in the application of these principles. Themes include sustainable agriculture, green building, renewable energy, and conservation and restoration. Prerequisites: BIOL 130, BIOL 135, PHYS 125

ENVS 350 US AND WESTERN ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS

An historical and contemporary investigation of U.S. environmental policies with an applied focus on the impact of national policy on the ecosystems and cultures of the American West. Reciprocally, this course traces how public lands agencies, social movements, historical land uses, and diverse cultures in the West shape U.S. environmental policy. Students combine analysis and discussion of major U.S. policies, prominent theories and issues, and student-led environmental service projects to better understand environmental challenges. Prerequisites: ENVS 100; ENVS 200 or COTH 202;and ECON 370.

ENVS 360 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

A critical examination of key perspectives, economic and political processes, policy actors, and institutions involved in global environmental issues. Students analyze ecological, cultural, and social dimensions of international environmental concerns and governance as they have emerged in response to increased recognition of global environmental threats, globalization, and international contributions to understanding of these issues. The focus of the course encourages students to engage and evaluate texts within the broad policy discourse on globalization, justice, and the environment. Prerequisites: ENVS 100; ECON 201, ENVS 200 or SCI 202; junior standing or instructor approval.

ENVS 370 WATER POLICY AND POLITICS

Study of the history, politics and institutions related to water policy and administration with comparative reference to different regions of the United States and internationally. Attention is given to the industrial development of the East and the created water resources of the arid West as a way to understand changing social sentiments toward water and water policy. The course also examines water pollution laws and water management. Prerequisites: ENVS 100; ECON 201 or ENVS 200 or SCI 202; junior standing or instructor approval.

ENVS 373 THE WATER PLANET

An advanced water science course specifically designed for students interested in water related environmental science and policy. Topics include the physical and chemical properties of natural fresh waters and the movement and reservoirs of fresh water within the water cycle. The course includes several hands-on exercises and field experiences where students investigate and analyze natural waters in the Gunnison Basin. Prerequisites: GEOL 101; GEOL 105 and one of the following: CHEM 101 or CHEM 111

ENVS 375 SEMINAR IN WATER TOPICS

An occasional offering that may include water topics in politics and policy, ethics and philosophy, or science. Prerequisite: ENVS 200 and ENVS 301, or instructor permission.

ENVS 376 COLORADO WATER WORKSHOP

A three-day annual conference bringing students together with a variety of water users, managers, ranchers, environmentalists, regulators and others involved in water issues for presentations and discussion on matters ranging from specific municipal or water district projects to major basin-wide planning for the great rivers of the West to global issues of water use and protection. Topics vary from year to year. Prerequisite: ENVS 350 and ENVS 370, or instructor permission.

ENVS 390 ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

A field-work based study of local (Gunnison Basin) environmental problems. Numerous monitoring techniques are implemented based on principles of biology, chemistry, and geology. The emphasis is on collaborative and integrative group projects dealing directly with real-world environmental problems. Prerequisites: ENVS 301 and one of the following: ECON 216, MATH 213 or SOC 211.

ENVS 397 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics

ENVS 400 APPLIED SUSTAINABILITY

A field-based, collaborative, problem-solving experience that addresses a current issue in environmental sustainability. Implementing frameworks such as resilient and systems thinking, students collect information, analyze results, write a report, publicly present their findings, and begin to implement solutions informed by their analysis. Students learn basic skills for transforming their ENVS education into compelling environmental professional career possibilities. Prerequisites: ENVS 350 and ENVS 390.

ENVS 410 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS

A seminar on the complexities of environmental issues from a philosophical perspective. The course also offers a survey of the evolution of environmental moral philosophy as well as in-depth analysis of major thinkers in the field. Students confront ethical concerns from both historical and personal perspectives, with an emphasis on the ability to critically evaluate and apply these perspectives to their work in environmental fields. Prerequisite: ENVS 301 and 350; or PHIL 335.

ENVS 420 NATURAL HISTORY OF GUNNISON BASIN

An overview of place-based natural history, current ecological research, and current environmental issues facing the region. Prerequisites: ENVS 100 and instructor permission.

ENVS 430 WATERSHEDS OF THE WORLD

This field course is designed to provide students with an introduction to important science and policy issues in selected watersheds throughout the world. Students receive an overview of place-based natural history, current ecological research, and current environmental issues and policy facing the region. Examples include the local and global effects of resource extraction, tourism, air and water pollution, land use changes, and global climate change. This is an expedition course (approximately 3 weeks) and is experiential in nature. Prerequisites: ENVS 100 and instructor permission.

ENVS 497 SPECIAL TOPICS

Special topics

ENVS 499 INTERNSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABILITY

An opportunity to apply skills and knowledge from course work to an employment setting. Prerequisite: approval from an Environmental Studies advisor and the Program Director.

ENVS 601 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

An introduction to the MEM program, to bioregional and resilient approaches to environmental management, and to the environmental stakeholders, problems, solutions, and learning laboratories of the Gunnison Valley. Requires two-week residency in Gunnison during culmination of course. Prerequisites: Admission to the MEM Program.

ENVS 601 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Introduction to environmental management.  An introduction to the MEM program, to bioregional and resilient approaches to environmental management, and to the environmental stakeholders, problems, solutions, and learning laboratories of the Gunnison Valley. Requires two-week residency in Gunnison during culmination of course. Prerequisites: Admission to the MEM Program. 

ENVS 605 SCIENCE OF APPLIED ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Provides a rigorous and hands-on overview of the principles and methods of environmental science. Students gain practical experience with a range of laboratory, field, and analytical approaches, with a focus on current environmental research in the Gunnison Basin. Topics include water quality, riparian condition, rangeland monitoring, forest health, threatened and endangered species, air quality, conservation, and ecological restoration. Students develop skills in scientific literature searches, writing monitoring protocols, ensuring quality data collection, databasing, statistical analysis, interpretation of results, written and oral communication, and peer review. Prerequisites: ENVS 601.

ENVS 605 SCIENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Provides a rigorous and hands-on overview of the principles and methods of environmental science. Students gain practical experience with a range of laboratory, field, and analytical approaches, with a focus on current environmental research in the Gunnison Basin. Topics include water quality, riparian condition, rangeland monitoring, forest health, threatened and endangered species, air quality, conservation, and ecological restoration. Students develop skills in scientific literature searches, writing monitoring protocols, ensuring quality data collection, statistical analysis, interpretation of results, written and oral communication, and peer review. Prerequisites: ENVS 601.

ENVS 608 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY

Analysis of the key interactions between environmental policy and management, focusing on environmental decision-making within an array of policy contexts. Emphasis is on important federal policies such as the Clean Water Act and NEPA, with additional attention to relevant state and local policies. Prerequisites: ENVS 601. 

ENVS 608 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY

Analysis of the key interactions between environmental policy and management, focusing on environmental decision-making within an array of policy contexts. Emphasis is on important federal policies such as the Clean Water Act and NEPA, with additional attention to relevant state and local policies. Prerequisites: ENVS 601

ENVS 611 INTEGRATIVE SKILLS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Course focuses on developing and managing environmental projects and organizations.  Students develop a thorough understanding of integrative assessment, adaptive  management, and triple bottom line strategies. Students apply these approaches to the  development of professional skills such as organizational development, conflict management, and environmental communication. Prerequisites: ENVS 601. 

ENVS 611 INTEGRATIVE SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Course focuses on developing and managing environmental projects and organizations. Students develop a thorough understanding of integrative assessment, adaptive management, and triple bottom line strategies. Students apply these approaches to the development of professional skills such as organizational development, conflict management, and environmental communication. Prerequisites: ENVS 601

ENVS 612 QUANTITATIVE SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

An overview of a range of quantitative analytical methods and statistical approaches essential to environmental management careers in both Integrative Land Management and Sustainable and Resilient Communities. Topics covered include descriptive and inferential statistics, databasing, geographic information systems, and graphic presentation of results. Course empowers students to organize, analyze, and graphically present environmental data. Prerequisites: ENVS 601 and an undergraduate-level course in statistics.

ENVS 612 QUANTITATIVE SKILLS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

An overview of a range of quantitative analytical methods and statistical approaches essential to environmental management careers in both Integrative Land Management and Sustainable and Resilient Communities. Topics covered include descriptive and inferential statistics, geographic information systems, cost-benefit analysis, and graphic presentation of results. Course empowers students to organize, analyze, and graphically present environmental data. Prerequisites: ENVS 601 and an undergraduate-level course in statistics.

ENVS 615 SCIENCE OF CLIMATE MITAGTION ADAPTATTION

An investigation of the science of climate change, with an emphasis on mitigation and adaptation strategies for careers in environmental management. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of atmospheric and earth sciences that form the scientific basis of climate change and survey the large body of evidence of anthropogenic warming. Topics include greenhouse gas emissions, climate forcings and feedbacks, observed and projected climate changes, effects on ecological and human systems, and the opportunities and challenges of a diverse suite of strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation at the local, regional, and planetary scale. Prerequisites: ENVS 605; two undergraduate courses in natural or environmental sciences, one of which must be upper-level with LABORATORY/field component.

ENVS 615 SCIENCE OF CLIMATE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION

An investigation of the science of climate change, with an emphasis on mitigation and adaptation strategies for careers in environmental management. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of atmospheric and earth sciences that form the scientific basis of climate change and survey the large body of evidence of anthropogenic warming. Topics include greenhouse gas emissions, climate forcings and feedbacks, observed and projected climate changes, effects on ecological and human systems, and the opportunities and challenges of a diverse suite of strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation at the local, regional, and planetary scale. Prerequisites: ENVS 605; two undergraduate courses in natural or environmental sciences, one of which must be upper-level with lab/field component. 

ENVS 616 ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT

An introduction to developing organizations at the nexus of economic, social, and natural systems, and to the key skills necessary to succeed in this complex and highly competitive environment. Course discusses competitively advantageous strategies and practices organizations adopt to grow revenues, cut costs, improve market share, enhance brands, and redesign products and processes toward positive environmental and social impacts. Course examples will include sustainable innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship from around the world. Students learn to identify the best opportunities, generate innovative non-profit and for-profit business models, frame and reframe problems, produce creative solutions, and generate a culture of innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship within an organization utilizing principles from a variety of thinking methods including systems, design, and group thinking. Prerequisites: ENVS 605; ENVS 608; ENVS 611

ENVS 616 ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT AND MGMT

Environmental Organization Development and Management - 

An introduction to developing and managing environmental organizations, including  managing change within and beyond organizations to maximize the effectiveness of  environmental solutions. Course discusses competitively advantageous strategies and practices organizations adopt to write successful grants, grow revenues, cut costs, and  redesign projects and processes. Management examples will include sustainable  innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship in private, government, and nonprofit  sectors from around the world. Students learn leadership skills that foster a culture of  innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship within an organization, utilizing principles  from a variety of thinking methods including systems, design, and group thinking.  Prerequisites: ENVS 605; ENVS 608; ENVS 611; ENVS 612. 

ENVS 618 PUBLIC LANDS MANAGEMENT

An exploration of the current and traditional approaches to public land and resource management. A regional focus on the Western U.S. is integrated with comparative examples from other regions and countries to enhance and broaden student perspectives. Course examines the history and future management implications of public lands agencies and policies, such as the National Parks, National Forests, Bureau of Land Management, NEPA and multi-use mandates. Prerequisites: ENVS 605; ENVS 608; ENVS 611

ENVS 618 PUBLIC LANDS MANAGEMENT

An exploration of the current and traditional approaches to public land and resource management. A regional focus on the Western U.S. is integrated with comparative 
examples from other regions and countries to enhance and broaden student perspectives. Course examines the history and future management implications of public lands agencies and policies, such as the National Parks, National Forests, Bureau of Land Management, NEPA and multi-use mandates. Special focus will be given to the 
management skills necessary in leading public lands agencies on the regional level. Prerequisites: ENVS 605; ENVS 608; ENVS 611; ENVS 612. 

ENVS 620 STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE AND RESILIENT COMMUNTIES

An examination of selected topics covering the content understanding, analytical skills, and management approaches vital to cultivating sustainable and resilient communities. Topics include subjects such as Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation, Sustainable Food Systems, Sustainable Energy Futures, Sustainable Economic Development, Movements in Community Resilience, and Frameworks in Sustainability. This course is repeatable, since students are required to take this course three times, as long as the topic changes. Prerequisites: ENVS 601

ENVS 620 STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE AND RESLILENT COMMUNITIES

An examination of selected topics covering the content understanding, analytical skills, and management approaches vital to cultivating sustainable and resilient communities. Topics include subjects such as Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation, Sustainable Food Systems, Sustainable Energy Futures, Sustainable Economic Development, Movements in Community Resilience, and Frameworks in Sustainability. This course is repeatable, since students are required to take this course three times, as long as the topic changes. Prerequisites: ENVS 616. 

ENVS 625 STUDIES IN INTEGRATIVE LAND MANAGEMENT

An examination of selected topics covering the content understanding, analytical skills, and management approaches vital to cultivating sustainable and resilient communities. Topics include subjects such as Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation, Sustainable Food Systems, Sustainable Energy Futures, Sustainable Economic Development, Movements in Community Resilience, and Frameworks in Sustainability. This course is repeatable, since students are required to take this course three times, as long as the topic changes. Prerequisites: ENVS 601

ENVS 625 STUDIES IN INTEGRATIVE LAND MANAGEMENT

An examination of selected topics covering the content understanding, analytical skills, and management approaches vital to integrative land management. Topics include subjects such as Watershed Coalition Development; Forest Ecology and Management; Rangeland Ecology and Management; Wildlife Ecology and Management; The History and Future of Energy on Public Lands; Public/Private Conservation Partnerships; Managing the Urban/Wildland Interface; and Conservation Advocacy. This course is repeatable, since students are required to take this course three times, but cannot repeat the same topic. Prerequisites: ENVS 618. 

ENVS 690 MEM PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

An introduction to the Materas Project. Course examines environmental project design strategies, successful environmental solutions, and organizations/community stakeholder groups seeking environmental management assistance from MEM students in the master's Project. Students design, plan, and coordinate second year masters' Project with faculty mentors and community stakeholders. Requires two-weeks residency in Gunnison during culmination of course. Prerequisites: MEM Core

ENVS 694 MASTER'S PROJECT AND PORTFOLIO

Students design and apply a specific research and environmental management project to an active environmental organization, green business, land agency, or community stakeholder group. Requires students to develop a lens and goal for environmental management; identify a project that enables the student to manifest his/her environmental management goal; research global best practices for similar projects; complete the project over 10 months; write up, present, and defend the results for the faculty mentor and MEM community; and complete an environmental career portfolio. Course spans Fall (3 credits) and Spring (6 credits) of the second year, and requires 9 total hours. This is a repeatable course for variable credit. Prerequisites: ENVS 690.

ESS 100 INTERCOLLEGIATE BASKETBALL

Basketball open to members of the intercollegiate basketball team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: Coach/instructor permission

ESS 101 INTERCOLLEGIATE CROSS COUNTRY

Intercollegiate Athletics: Cross Country Open to members of the intercollegiate cross country team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: Coach/ instructor permission

ESS 102 INTERCOLLEGIATE FOOTBALL

Football Open to members of the intercollegiate Football team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: Coach/ instructor permission

ESS 103 INTERCOLLEGIATE INDOOR TRACK

Indoor Track Open to members of the intercollegiate Indoor Track team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: Coach/ instructor permission

ESS 104 INTERCOLLEGIATE OUTDOOR TRACK

Open to members of the intercollegiate Outdoor Track team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: Coach/ instructor permission.

ESS 105 INTERCOLLEGIATE VOLLEYBALL

Open to members of the intercollegiate Volleyball team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: Coach/ instructor permission.

ESS 106 INTERCOLLEGIATE WRESTLING

Open to members of the intercollegiate athletic wrestling team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: Coach/instructor permission.

ESS 107 INTERCOLLEGIATE SOCCER

Open to members of the intercollegiate athletic soccer team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: coach/instructor permission.

ESS 108 INTERCOLLEGIATE SWIMMING

Open to members of the intercollegiate athletic swimming team. May be taken one time for credit. Prerequisite: coach/instructor permission.

ESS 112 SELECTED ACTIVITIES IN RECREATION, EXERCISE AND SPORTS SCIENCE

A specific activity is offered as student interest, facilities, faculty, and equipment are available.

ESS 131 PHYSICAL CONDITIONING

Off-season conditioning activities for intercollegiate athletes. Students develop the knowledge of how to improve and maintain fitness relevant to their sport during the off-season. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

ESS 132 WEIGHT TRAINING

The theory and practice of weight training. Information is presented concerning physiological and bio-mechanical adaptations accompanying resistive training, reasonable methods of improving athletic performance, and methods of resistance training that can lead to improved quality of life.

ESS 135 MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDING

Students develop general knowledge of and proficiency in the activity, equipment, safety procedures, and terminology of the fundamental skills of mountain bike riding.

ESS 160 SWIMMING-BEGINNING

An introduction to swimming designed to equip the students with the basic water safety skills and knowledge needed to be reasonably safe while in, on, or about the water.

ESS 161 SWIMMING-INTERMEDIATE

Satisfactory completion of these skills leads to the Red Cross Intermediate and Swimmer's Certificate.

ESS 170 LIFEGUARD TRAINING

Provides the individual with the knowledge and skills designed to save one's own life or the life of another in the event of an emergency, with certification by the American Red Cross.

ESS 172 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION

Satisfactory completion of these skills leads to the Red Cross WSI Certificate.

ESS 181 FOUNDATIONS OF EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE

An introduction to the field of exercise and sport science. An overview of philosophical, historical, and scientific foundations, current trends and issues, professional opportunities, and skills and competencies required for careers in a wide variety of physical activity settings.

ESS 185 LIFETIME WELLNESS

Provides conceptual and experiential components designed as a basis for developing a healthier lifestyle.

ESS 201 ESSENTIALS HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

An introduction to basic anatomy and physiology of all human systems. LABORATORY and lecture are integrated.

ESS 210 SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS: NET AND WALL GAMES

Skill development and analysis in net and wall games, including tennis, volleyball, pickleball, handball, and badminton. Learning and application of content in a developmental model. History, scoring, rules, terminology, equipment, and safety considerations included.

ESS 211 SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS : INVASION GAMES

Skill development and analysis for invasion games, including soccer, lacrosse, team handball, speedball, basketball, ultimate Frisbee, and flagball. Learning and application of content in a developmental model. History, scoring, rules, terminology, equipment, and safety considerations included.

ESS 212 SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS: TARGET FIELDNG

Skill development and analysis for target and fielding games including bowling, archery, golf (traditional and disc), softball, and bocce. Learning and application of content in a developmental model. History, scoring, rules, terminology, equipment, and safety considerations included.

ESS 213 SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS: DANCE

Skill development and analysis for a variety of dance forms including fitness, folk, country, social, and ballroom. Learning and application of content in a developmental model. History, terminology, music choices, and safety considerations included.

ESS 221 METHODS OF COACHING FOOTBALL

The fundamental principles and play of football, including a basic defensive and offensive game plan, the fundamentals and techniques involved in coaching football, a basic outline of coaching the quarterback, the moral and ethical responsibilities of the coach to game participants, administration, etc., as well as coaching philosophy and interpretation of the rules.

ESS 223 METHODS OF COACHING BASKETBALL

A study of individual fundamentals and techniques, as well as team offensive and defensive patterns and strategies involved in coaching basketball.

ESS 225 METHODS OF COACHING WRESTLING

An introduction to all phases of wrestling. Fundamental movements and techniques, rule interpretations, and approved coaching ethics are covered.

ESS 227 METHODS COACHING TRACK FIELD

The techniques and fundamentals of each track and field event. The course also includes the important phase of practical track meet management.

ESS 229 METHODS OF COACHING VOLLEYBALL

Lecture and discussion with research assignments and practicum work. An understanding of basic offenses (6-0 and 4-2), basic defensive coverage and rotations, service reception, and serving sets are presented.

ESS 275 MOTOR DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

An application of the knowledge of motor development and learning to physical activity across the lifespan. This class introduces the physiological, perceptual, and cognitive, as well as the affective changes that occur in motor development and learning across the lifespan. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a grade of "C-" or above.

ESS 276 EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Students are provided essential knowledge and skills needed to develop CPR and advanced first-aid capabilities. For students who might be required to provide first aid frequently and for special interest groups. Exercise and Sports Science majors have first option for this course.

ESS 282 PRINCIPLES OF SPORT MANAGEMENT

A focus on the administration of programs within the sport and fitness industries. Topics include administrative theories and concepts, personnel, communication and problem solving, fiscal management, budgeting, ethical considerations, and program evaluation. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a grade of "C-" or above, ESS 181, or instructor permission.

ESS 290 CURRICULUM DEVELEPMENT LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

A comprehensive overview of materials, suggested teaching methods, procedures, techniques, well-directed and well-selected activities, and ways of evaluating physical education in K-12 schools.

ESS 298 FITNESS INSTRUCTION

Students develop knowledge and skills to plan and implement group fitness classes as well as personal training sessions. Topics include: risk management, exercise plans, group fitness instruction, personal training, fitness pedagogy, training special populations, cardiovascular fitness, resistance training, flexibility training, and core stability. Prerequisite: ESS 201 or BIOL 372.

ESS 320 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

A variety of issues and research areas in the psychology of sport and physical activity are addressed. Topics covered include an overview of the development of sport and exercise psychology, personality theories, exercise and mood, exercise adherence, goal setting, motivation, psychological interventions for athletes, and cohesion theories. Prerequisite: minimum junior standing.

ESS 330 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY

An emphasis on the theory and principles of exercise physiology to health, physical fitness, and athletic performance in diverse populations. Prerequisites: ESS 201 or both BIOL 372 and BIOL 373.

ESS 331 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY

Basic laboratory techniques of exercise physiology correlating with ESS 330. laboratory experiences include aerobic and anaerobic exercise, body composition, strength, flexibility, and body composition and other indicators of exercise. Prerequisites: completion of the College Mathematics course requirement; Corequisite: ESS 330.

ESS 340 MENTAL TRAINING FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE

An application of theories and concepts of sport psychology. This course focuses on application of specific psychological skills necessary for high level performance and assisting students in teaching others those same skills. Prerequisite: ESS 320 or instructor permission.

ESS 346 PSYCHOLOGY OF COACHING

Psychological factors involved in coaching and leadership are explored in this course. Relevant theory and research, as well as practical applications, are discussed. Topics include expert coaching characteristics and behaviors, leadership and motivational styles, the coach-athlete relationship, stresses of coaching, reinforcement strategies, ethics in coaching, and issues related to youth sport coaching. This course is designed for current and future coaches, individuals in leadership roles, as well as anyone interested in the coach's experience. Prerequisites: ESS 320, minimum junior standing or instructor permission.

ESS 350 INSTRUCTIONAL ASSESSMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

A study of planning, administering, and evaluating accountability systems in physical education settings. Multiple assessment strategies for psychomotor, cognitive and affective learning objectives are presented. Students select and/or construct assessment tools to match specific learning outcomes in the K-12 physical education curriculum. Prerequisites: ESS 181, completion of the University Mathematics course requirement and ESS 290.

ESS 353 COORDINATED SCHOOL HEALTH & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

Overview of coordinated school health programs with a heavy focus on local wellness policy, comprehensive school health education and the role of physical activity and physical education in schools. Includes 2-4 hours of required field experience. Prerequisites: EDUC 000 and junior standing.

ESS 355 PSYCHOLOGY OF INJURY

Psychological factors involved in sport-related injuries and the rehabilitation process. Course content includes relevant theory and research as well as practical applications. Topics include: stress, responses to injury, mental skills used to manage injury (i.e., goal setting, motivation, and confidence), social support, potential psychological problems faced during rehabilitation, and returning to sport after injury. Prerequisites: ESS 320, minimum junior standing or instructor permission.

ESS 360 SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION

A focus on concepts geared to promote peak performance based upon nutritional intake. An understanding of macronutrient ingestion along with other essential nutrients is gained and applied in detail to the physically active population. This includes an understanding of the metabolic effect of food. The pros and cons of select sport supplements are discussed and applied to real-life scenarios. Prerequisites or co-requisites: ESS 330 and ESS 331.

ESS 363 ADAPTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Students develop knowledge and skills necessary to work with individuals having diverse needs in physical education, recreation, sport, fitness, or rehabilitation settings. Content includes planning, instructional design, assessment, coordination of resources, and advocacy in physical activity settings. Prerequisites: ESS 275 and minimum junior standing.

ESS 365 TOPICS IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY:

Interdisciplinary study of the role of physical activity under a variety of conditions and settings, and for a variety of populations. Content focuses on current research and practice as it relates to the topic under consideration. Topics will rotate annually. Can be repeated up to three times for credit if a different topic is selected. Prerequisites: ESS 181, ESS 185; ESS 201 or BIOL 372; junior/senior standing.

ESS 370 ESSNTLS OF STRENGTH TRAINING AND CONDITIONING

Exercise prescription and conditioning in the form of resistance training, including the use of free weights, machines, Olympic lifts, and plyometric. Muscular adaptations to anaerobic and aerobic training, testing and evaluation, exercise techniques, and resistance training program design. Design, implementation, and demonstration of appropriate resistance training routines and proper lifting technique for a variety of populations. Content knowledge aligns with requirements for completion of certification as a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Prerequisite: ESS 330 or instructor permission.

ESS 382 MANAGEMENT OF SPORT AND FITNESS FACILITIES

A study of the principles, guidelines and recommendations for planning, constructing and the use and maintenance of indoor and outdoor sports, physical education, recreational and fitness facilities. Prerequisite: ESS 181

ESS 385 PROGRAM DESIGN FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY SETTINGS

A focus on the principles of behavior modification and how they apply to program design and implementation in physical activity settings. Comprehensive behavior modification programs within exercise, wellness or sport settings are designed. Prerequisite: ESS 185.

ESS 392 METHODS OF SECONDARY ACTIVITIES

For students planning to obtain licensure in physical education. A variety of curriculum models (e.g., tactical, sport education, social responsibility) are used to present individual, dual and team sport activities. Lesson and unit plans are developed, implemented and assessed in keeping with Colorado and NASPE standards as they relate to secondary physical education. Prerequisites: 2 of the following: ESS 210, 211, 212, 213; ESS 290, minimum junior standing; Prerequisite or corequisite: ESS 350

ESS 395 METHODS OF ELEMENTARY ACTIVITIES

Units covered may include apparatus and tumbling, dance, and games. Each unit breaks down into sub-units, and progressions are emphasized. Lesson and unit plans are developed, implemented, and assessed in keeping with national standards and as they relate to elementary physical education. Competencies in the basic skills of each unit are also tested. Prerequisites: two of the following: ESS 210, 211, 212, 213; ESS 290; and minimum junior standing; Prerequisite or corequisite: ESS 350.